Education in the Maldives

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Traditionally children aged three and up in the Maldives were educated in traditional schools known as "edhurge", generally using a single large room or the shelter of tree. The children learn simple arithmetic, Dhivehi and some Arabic, and practice reciting the Qur'an. These private schools no longer exist, as western style schools replaced them in the 1980s-1990s·

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The first western-style school in the Maldives is the Majeediyya School, a secondary established in 1927. The school was originally co-educational, but it was felt necessary to create a second school for girls (Aminiyya School) in 1944.

Majeediyya School is the first Maldivian government school, located in Malé, Maldives. It was a single gender school that used to teach only boys students to the secondary level of education until the introduction of Primary Education in 2010 when the school was opened to both genders. English medium is followed in teaching with the exception of Dhivehi and Islam. In 2010 Majeediyya School became first school in the Republic of Maldives that has changed its teaching methods from traditional blackboard to the modern electronic whiteboard with iBoards in all classes.

Aminiyya School

Aminiya School is a primary and secondary school in Malé, the capital of the Maldives. It is the first girls' secondary school in the country and remained the only all-girls school until 14 June 2011

Based on a study by educational advisors from UNESCO, the Government of Maldives began implementation of the Educational Development Project on 6 October 1976. This Project constituted a comprehensive programme of educational development comprising Expansion of Primary Education, Teacher Training, Curriculum Development, Educational Radio, Community Education Programme for Adult Education and Textbook Development and Printing. The first School under this Project was opened in Baa Atoll Eydhafushi in March 1978 followed by another in HDh. Kulhudhuffushi in March 1979. Schools construction was continued in all atolls and was later complemented by Primary Schools construction project by Japan. Curriculum Development began in 1976, while Teacher Training began in 1977. Simultaneously other Programmes were introduced and continued through the 1970s and until the mid 1980s from where on the First Ten Year Master Plan for Educational (1986-1995) began implementation. Second Master Plan was implemented 1996-2005. These were the bases of educational development in the Maldives begun by the government of President Nasir continued by President Gayoom.

As of 2002, the President's Office claimed that universal primary education has almost been achieved and the literacy rate had improved from 70 percent in 1978 to 98.82 percent. In 2005, there were 106,220 students in schools, or 40% of the total population.

Higher education

A National University Act was passed in January 2011 to establish the first university in the Maldives. [1] Institutions offering higher education in the Maldives are:

Higher education is tertiary education leading to award of an academic degree. Higher education, also called post-secondary education, third-level or tertiary education, is an optional final stage of formal learning that occurs after completion of secondary education. It represents levels 6, 7 and 8 of the 2011 version of the International Standard Classification of Education structure. Tertiary education at non-degree level is sometimes referred to as further education or continuing education as distinct from higher education.

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References

  1. "Maldives to get first-ever university with University Act". Haveeru. 17 January 2011. Archived from the original on 17 June 2011. Retrieved 23 January 2011.
  2. 1 2 Akhtar, Shahid; Arinto, Patricia (2010). Digital Review of Asia Pacific 2009-2010. IDRC. ISBN   81-321-0084-0.
  3. "CIMA expands into the Maldives". The Island. Sri Lanka. 3 November 2007. Retrieved 23 January 2011.