Electoral district of Sturt (South Australia)

Last updated

Sturt
South AustraliaHouse of Assembly
State South Australia
Dates current1857–1902, 1915–1938
Namesake Charles Sturt
DemographicMetropolitan

Sturt (The Sturt until 1875) was an electoral district of the House of Assembly in the Australian state of South Australia. [1] It was named after the explorer Charles Sturt.

Sturt was one of the initial districts in the first parliament. [1] It was initially centred on Unley, but later broadened to include all or part of Belair, Brighton, Glenelg, Goodwood, Hyde Park, Mitcham, Parkside and Sturt. When recreated in 1915, it also included Hawthorn and Wayville. [2]

Members

First incarnation (1857–1902)
MemberPartyTermMemberPartyTerm
  John Hallett 1857–1862  Thomas Reynolds 1857–1860
   Joseph Peacock 1860–1867
  R. B. Andrews 1862–1870
   Alexander Murray 1867–1868
   Joseph Fisher 1868–1870
  Frederick Spicer 1870–1870
  William Townsend 1870–1882  John Lindsay 1870–1871
  J. H. Barrow 1871–1874
  William Mair 1874–1875
  S. J. Way 1875–1876
  Thomas King 1876–1881
   Josiah Symon 1881–1887
  Thomas King 1882–1885
  S. G. Glyde 1885–1887
  W. F. Stock 1887–1893  John Jenkins 1887–1902
  Thomas Price Labor 1893–1902
Second incarnation (1915–1938)
MemberPartyTermMemberPartyTermMemberPartyTerm
  Crawford Vaughan Labor 1915–1917  T. H. Smeaton Labor 1915–1917  Thomas Ryan Labor 1915–1917
  National 1917–1918  National 1917–1921  National 1917–1917
  Independent 1918–1918
  Arthur Blackburn National 1918–1921  Edward Vardon Liberal Union 1918–1921
  Herbert Richards Liberal Union 1921–1923  George Hussey Liberal Union 1921–1923  Ernest Anthoney Liberal Union 1921–1923
  Liberal Federation 1923–1930  Liberal Federation 1923–1924  Liberal Federation 1923–1938
  Edward Vardon Liberal Federation 1924–1930
  Bob Dale Labor 1930–1931  Edgar Dawes Labor 1930–1933
  Lang Labor 1931–1933
  Liberal and Country 1932–1938
  Henry Dunks Liberal and Country 1933–1938  Horace Hogben Liberal and Country 1933–1938

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References

  1. 1 2 "Statistical Record of the Legislature 1836 to 2009" (PDF). Parliament of South Australia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 March 2019. Retrieved 20 September 2013.
  2. "History of South Australian elections 1857-2006, volume 1". Electoral Commission of South Australia. Archived from the original on 2 March 2014. Retrieved 23 July 2015.

Coordinates: 34°57′S138°36′E / 34.950°S 138.600°E / -34.950; 138.600