Electoral district of Torrens

Last updated

Torrens
South AustraliaHouse of Assembly
Electoral district of Torrens 2022.svg
Electoral district of Torrens (green) in the Greater Adelaide area
State South Australia
Dates current1902–1915,
1938–1985,
1993–present
MP Dana Wortley
Party Australian Labor Party (SA)
Namesake Robert Torrens
Electors 25,110 (2018)
Area16.97 km2 (6.6 sq mi)
DemographicMetropolitan
Coordinates 34°51′50″S138°39′35″E / 34.86389°S 138.65972°E / -34.86389; 138.65972 Coordinates: 34°51′50″S138°39′35″E / 34.86389°S 138.65972°E / -34.86389; 138.65972
Electorates around Torrens:
Port Adelaide Florey Newland
Enfield Torrens Morialta
Adelaide Dunstan Hartley
Footnotes
Electoral District map [1]

Torrens is a single-member electoral district for the South Australian House of Assembly. Located along the River Torrens, it is named after Sir Robert Richard Torrens, a 19th-century Premier of South Australia noted for being the founder of the "Torrens title" land registration system. [2] Torrens is an 18.8 square kilometres (7.3 sq mi) suburban electorate in Adelaide's north-east. It includes the suburbs of Dernancourt, Gilles Plains, Greenacres, Hampstead Gardens, Hillcrest, Holden Hill, Klemzig, Manningham, Oakden, Vale Park and Windsor Gardens.

Contents

Torrens has had three incarnations as a South Australian House of Assembly electoral district.

It was first created for the 1902 election as a five-seat multi-member district stretching from the north-eastern suburbs through the eastern and southern suburbs to the south-western suburbs; together with the three-member Port Adelaide (covering the north-western and western suburbs) and the four-member Adelaide (covering central Adelaide and the inner-northern suburbs), the three districts with a total of 12-members covered the whole of the metropolitan area in the 42 member house. [3] Torrens was abolished and absorbed into the new seats of East Torrens and Sturt at the 1915 election. [4]

Torrens existed as a marginal to fairly safe Liberal and Country League/Liberal single-member seat under the Playmander system from the 1938 election, lasting until the 1985 election, though it was won once by Labor at the 1944 election. Torrens was one of just three metropolitan seats (with Burnside and Mitcham) won by the Liberal and Country League in 1965 and 1968.

Torrens was recreated in its current state for the 1993 election, based on much of the abolished seats of Gilles and Todd, as a nominally marginal Labor seat, but was won for the Liberal Joe Tiernan. Tiernan died while in office in 1994, and Robyn Geraghty reclaimed the seat for Labor at the Torrens by-election with an 8.6 percent swing. Former Senator Dana Wortley won the seat for Labor at the 2014 election.

Members for Torrens

First incarnation (1902–1915, 5 members)
TermMemberPartyMemberPartyMemberPartyMemberPartyMemberPartyTerm
1902–1905   John Darling Jr. National League   John Jenkins   George Soward National League   Thomas Price Labor   Frederick Coneybeer Labor 1902–1905
1905–1910   Crawford Vaughan Labor   George Dankel Labor   Thomas Smeaton Labor 1905–1910
1910–1912   Thomas Ryan United Labor 1910–1912
1912–1915   Herbert Hudd Liberal Union   Herbert Angas Parsons Liberal Union 1912–1915
Second incarnation (1938–1985, single-member)
MemberPartyTerm
  Shirley Jeffries Liberal and Country 1938–1944
  Herbert Baldock Labor 1944–1947
  Shirley Jeffries Liberal and Country 1947–1953
  John Travers Liberal and Country 1953–1956
  John Coumbe Liberal and Country 1956–1974
  Liberal 1974–1977
  Michael Wilson Liberal 1977–1985
Third incarnation (1993–present, single-member)
MemberPartyTerm
  Joe Tiernan Liberal 1993–1994
  Robyn Geraghty Labor 1994–2014
  Dana Wortley Labor 2014–present

Election results

2022 South Australian state election: Torrens
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labor Dana Wortley 7,23048.2+4.8
Liberal Ursula Henderson4,98733.3−3.6
Greens Lazaras Panayiotou1,65911.1+3.8
Family First Mervin Joshua1,1117.4+7.4
Total formal votes14,98796.6
Informal votes5213.4
Turnout 15,50855.0
Two-party-preferred result
Labor Dana Wortley 8,96959.8+4.1
Liberal Ursula Henderson6,01840.2−4.1
Labor hold Swing +4.1
Results are not final. Last updated on 21 March 2022 at 12:16 pm ACST

Notes

  1. Electoral District of Torrens (Map). Electoral Commission of South Australia. 2018. Retrieved 1 April 2018.
  2. "Torrens". Electoral Commission SA. Retrieved 15 November 2019.
  3. "Parliamentary Electorates". The Adelaide Chronicle. 5 April 1902. p. 33 via Trove.
  4. "Statistical Record of the Legislature 1836 to 2009" (PDF). Parliament of South Australia. Archived from the original (PDF) on 11 March 2019. Retrieved 5 December 2013.

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