Kutin language

Last updated
Kutin
Peere
Region Cameroon
Native speakers
(15,000 in Cameroon cited 1993) [1]
and a few in Nigeria
Niger–Congo
Dialects
  • Peere
  • Potopo
  • Patapori
Language codes
ISO 639-3 pfe
Glottolog peer1241 [2]

Kutin is a member of the Duru branch of Savanna languages. Most Nigerian speakers moved to Cameroon when the Gashaka-Gumti National Park was established.

The Duru languages are a group of Savanna languages spoken in northern Cameroon and eastern Nigeria. They were labeled "G4" in Joseph Greenberg's Adamawa language-family proposal.

Blench (2004) considers the three varieties, Peere, Potopo (Kotopo), and Patapori, to be separate languages.

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References

  1. Kutin at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2017). "Peere". Glottolog 3.0 . Jena, Germany: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History.