Multi-chip module

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A ceramic multi-chip module containing four POWER5 processor dies (center) and four 36 MB L3 cache dies (periphery).

A multi-chip module (MCM) is generically an electronic assembly (such as a package with a number of conductor terminals or "pins") where multiple integrated circuits (ICs or "chips"), semiconductor dies and/or other discrete components are integrated, usually onto a unifying substrate, so that in use it is treated as if it were a single component (as though a larger IC). [1] Other terms, such as "hybrid" or "hybrid integrated circuit", also refer to MCMs.

Contents

Overview

Multi-chip modules come in a variety of forms depending on the complexity and development philosophies of their designers. These can range from using pre-packaged ICs on a small printed circuit board (PCB) meant to mimic the package footprint of an existing chip package to fully custom chip packages integrating many chip dies on a high density interconnection (HDI) substrate.

Multi-Chip Module packaging is an important facet of modern electronic miniaturization and micro-electronic systems. MCMs are classified according to the technology used to create the HDI substrate.

Chip stack MCMs

A relatively new development in MCM technology is the so-called "chip-stack" package. [2] Certain ICs, memories in particular, have very similar or identical pinouts when used multiple times within systems. A carefully designed substrate can allow these dies to be stacked in a vertical configuration making the resultant MCM's footprint much smaller (albeit at the cost of a thicker or taller chip). Since area is more often at a premium in miniature electronics designs, the chip-stack is an attractive option in many applications such as cell phones and personal digital assistants (PDAs). After a thinning process, as many as ten dies can be stacked to create a high capacity SD memory card. [3]

Examples of MCM technologies

See also

References

  1. Rao Tummala, Solid State Technology. “SoC vs. MCM vs SiP vs. SoP.” Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  2. Jon Worrel (15 April 2012). "Intel migrates to desktop Multi-Chip Modules (MCMs) with 14nm Broadwell". Fudzilla.
  3. Richard Chirgwin, The Register. “Memory vendors pile on '3D' stacking standard.” April 2, 2013. February 5, 2016.
  4. High-performance MCM interconnection circuits and fluxoelectronics, Proc. 1992 IEEE Multi-Chip Module Conf., Los Alamitos, CA: IEEE Computer Society Press, 1992, pp. 175-178. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/201478
  5. Multichip module using multilayer YBa2Cu3O7−δ interconnects, Appl. Phys. Lett.62, 1435-1437 (1993) https://aip.scitation.org/doi/10.1063/1.108652
  6. Satoru Iwata, Iwata Asks. “Changes in Television.” Retrieved August 4, 2015.
  7. "MCP (Multichip Package) | Samsung Semiconductor". www.samsung.com.
  8. "NAND based MCP | Samsung Memory Link". samsung.com.
  9. "e-MMC based MCP | Samsung Memory Link". samsung.com.