Pakistan women's national cricket team

Last updated

Pakistan
PakistanCricketLogo.png
Pakistan Cricket Crest
Association Pakistan Cricket Board
Personnel
Captain Javeria Khan
Coach David Hemp [1]
International Cricket Council
ICC statusFull member (1952)
ICC region Asia
ICC RankingsCurrent [2] Best-ever
WODI 7th 7th (01-Oct-2015)
WT20I 7th 7th
Women's Tests
First WTestv Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka at Colts Cricket Club Ground, Colombo; 17–20 April 1998
Last WTestv WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies at the National Stadium, Karachi; 15–18 March 2004
WTestsPlayedWon/Lost
Total [3] 3 0/2
(1 draw)
Women's One Day Internationals
First WODIv Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand at Hagley Oval, Christchurch; 28 January 1997
Last WODIv WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies at Coolidge Cricket Ground, Antigua; 18 July 2021
WODIsPlayedWon/Lost
Total [4] 173 50/119
(1 tie, 3 no results)
This year [5] 8 2/6
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's World Cup appearances4 (first in 1997 )
Best result5th (2009)
Women's World Cup Qualifier appearances4 (first in 2003 )
Best resultRunners-up (2008, 2011)
Women's Twenty20 Internationals
First WT20Iv Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland at The Vineyard, Dublin; 25 May 2009
Last WT20Iv WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies at Sir Vivian Richards Stadium, Antigua; 4 July 2021
WT20IsPlayedWon/Lost
Total [6] 123 48/70
(3 ties, 2 no results)
This year [7] 6 1/5
(0 ties, 0 no result)
Women's T20 World Cup appearances6 (first in 2009 )
Best resultFirst round (2009, 2010, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018)
Women's T20 World Cup Qualifier appearances1 (first in 2013 )
Best resultChampions (2013)
As of 18 July 2021

The Pakistan women's national cricket team represents Pakistan in international women's cricket. One of eight teams competing in the ICC Women's Championship (the highest level of international women's cricket), the team is organised by the Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB), a Full Member of the International Cricket Council (ICC).

Contents

Pakistan made its One Day International (ODI) debut in early 1997, against New Zealand, and later in the year played in the 1997 World Cup in India. The team's inaugural Test match came against Sri Lanka in April 1998. In its early years, Pakistan was one of the least competitive of the top-level women's teams, and after its inaugural appearance in 1997, did not qualify for another World Cup until the 2009 event in Australia. However, the team has played in all four editions of the Women's World Twenty20 to date, and also participated in the Women's Asia Cup and the Asian Games cricket tournament.

Support staff

History

Sana Mir, former captain of Pakistan women cricket team Sana Mir Portrait.jpg
Sana Mir, former captain of Pakistan women cricket team

1990s

The concept of Women's cricket was first introduced in Pakistan by two sisters Shaiza and Sharmeen Khan in 1996. In conservative Pakistan the creation of a Pakistan women`s cricket team was even considered illegal and was met with court cases and even death threats. The government refused them permission to play India in 1997 and ruled that women were forbidden from playing sports in public due to the religious issues. [8] [9]

However, the team did manage to overcome these objections and represented Pakistan in 1997, playing against New Zealand and Australia. They lost all three One Day International matches on that tour, but they were still invited to take part in the Women's Cricket World Cup later that year in India. They lost all five matches in the tournament and finished last, out of the eleven teams in the competition. The following year, Pakistan toured Sri Lanka and played three One Day International matches, losing all of their matches and played in their first Test match, which they also lost.

2000s

In 2000, Pakistan toured Ireland for a five match One Day International series against Ireland. They lost the Test match by an innings inside two days and the One Day International series 4–0, with one match interrupted by rain. Their first international win, in their 19th match, came against the Netherlands in a seven match One Day International series at their home ground in 2001, a series which they won 4–3. This form did not continue into their six One Day International tour of Sri Lanka in January 2002 though and they again lost all six matches.

In 2003, Pakistan travelled to the Netherlands to take part in the 2003 IWCC Trophy, the inaugural edition of what is now called simply the World Cup Qualifier. They finished fourth in the tournament, their victories were against Japan and Scotland, however they were missing out on qualification for the 2005 World Cup. This tournament was marred by a schism between the Pakistan Women's Cricket Control Association and the Pakistan Cricket Board. The IWCC did not recognise the Pakistan Cricket Board as the governing body of women's cricket in Pakistan and court cases were brought in Pakistan. [10] The Pakistan Cricket Board announced that they would not be sending a team to the tournament and that no other team should be allowed to represent the country in the competition. [11] This problem has since been overcome with the International Cricket Council requirement that women's associations and men's associations are unified under one single governing body.

2004 saw the West Indies tour Pakistan, playing seven One Day International matches and a Test match. The Test match was drawn and West Indies won the One Day International series 5–2, but those two victories for Pakistan were their first against a Test playing nation.

In 2005, Pakistan Cricket Board established a Women's Wing to oversee all Cricket Affairs under the Pakistan Cricket Board's control and to unite all the conflicts between various associations. The first international event was when Indian Under 21 team toured Pakistan, becoming the first Indian women's side to tour the country. This paved the way for Pakistan to host the second Women's Asia Cup in December 2005/January 2006. They lost all their games however, finishing last in the three team tournament. The tournament featured the first match between the Indian and Pakistani women's cricket teams.

Early in 2007, the Pakistan squad toured South Africa and played in a five match, One Day International series. During that year, Pakistan was awarded to Host the ICC Women's World Cup Qualifiers in which eight teams were scheduled to participate. All of the arrangements were almost completed when unfortunately the event was postponed due to political instability and was moved to South Africa. The Pakistan Women Team qualified for the ICC Women World Cup by defeating Ireland, Zimbabwe, Scotland and Netherlands. They qualified for this tournament after defeating Hong Kong in a three match series in Pakistan in September 2006.

In Pakistan, views towards Women' cricket have softened considerably since its introduction. Cricket is currently seen as an improvement for women's rights; although female players have to follow a professional rule and behave in an appropriate manner in public. [8] [9]

In June 2019, the PCB reduced the number of contracted players from 17 to 10, but increased remuneration for the retained players. [12] [13]

World Cup records

Women's ODI World Cup

Pakistan have participated in three editions of the Women's Cricket World Cup: 1997 Women's Cricket World Cup, 2009 Women's Cricket World Cup and 2013 Women's Cricket World Cup. [14] The team did not win any of their matches during the 1997 Cricket World Cup and finished at eleventh place. Pakistan saw their first win in the 2009 World Cup; they advanced to the Super Six round defeating Sri Lanka in group stage match by 57 runs with Nain Abidi scoring 26 runs, and the player of the match Qanita Jalil taking 3 wickets for 33. [15] They qualified for the 5th place playoff match defeating West Indies in the Super Sixes by 4 wickets, [16] but finished at 6th place losing to the same team by 3 wickets. [17] They were without any victory in the 2013 World Cup.

Women's T20I World Cup

Pakistan Women's team during the icc T20 world cup Pakistan womens T20 cricket team.jpg
Pakistan Women's team during the icc T20 world cup

Pakistan have participated in all the editions of the ICC Women's World Twenty20. They lost all of their games in 2009 ICC Women's World Twenty20 and 2010 ICC Women's World Twenty20. In the 2012 edition, they registered their solitary win over India. Pakistan defeated them by 1 run with Sana Mir scoring 26 runs and Nida Dar—who was awarded player of the match—taking 3 wickets for 13 runs. [18] Pakistan finished with 7th place playoff in the 2014 ICC Women's World Twenty20; they defeated Sri Lanka by 14 runs in the playoffs. Bismah Maroof scored 62 runs not out and Sania Khan took 3 wickets for 24 runs. Maroof was awarded woman of the match. [19]

Asia Cup

The Pakistan women's cricket team did not participate in the inaugural edition of the women's Asia cup in 2004–05, Sri Lanka and India played a five-match series in Sri Lanka. [20] Pakistan hosted the second edition of the Asia Cup in 2005–06, but they did not win a single game of the tournament. [21] India won the final by 97 runs, against Sri Lanka, played at the National Stadium, Karachi. [22] In the third edition of the women's Asia Cup, once again Pakistan failed to see a victory, and this was the third consecutive occasion that India and Sri Lanka were playing in the final. [23] In the 2008 edition of the Women's Asia Cup, Pakistan registered their only victory against the Bangladeshi women's cricket team who were participating for the first time in Asia Cup. [24]

The 2012 edition was a Twenty20 version of the game that took place in Guangzhou, China from 24 to 31 October 2012. Pakistan reached into the final of the tournament, and lost to India by 18 runs. Bismah Maroof was awarded woman of the tournament for her all-round performance. [25] [26]

Asian Games

Asian Games 2010

The Pakistan national women's cricket team won a gold medal in the inaugural women's cricket tournament in the 2010 Asian Games that took place in Guangzhou, China. In the final match at the 2010 Asian Games, Pakistan defeated Bangladesh women cricket team by 10 wickets. Bangladeshi women made 92 runs for 9 wickets with their captain Salma Khatun scoring 24; Nida Dar took 3 wickets giving away 16 runs in 4 overs. Pakistan women achieved the target of 93 runs in 15.4 overs without losing wickets: Dar scored 51 from 43 balls and Javeria Khan scored 39 runs from 51 balls, both remained not out. [27] [28] Asif Ali Zardari, the then-president of Pakistan, termed the team's win as a "gift to the nation riding on a series of crises" as 21 million people were affected by flood in 2010. [29]

Asian Games 2014

In the 2014 Asian games, Pakistan women's cricket team defeated again Bangladesh women cricket team in the final match by four runs in Incheon, South Korea. [30] In the low scoring match, Pakistan women scored 97 runs in 20 for 6 wickets. The match was interrupted by rain. Bangladesh women innings reduced to 7 overs and their revised target was 43 runs per Duckworth–Lewis method; they scored 38 runs for 9 wickets. This was the second consecutive title won by the Pakistan women against the same team in Asian Games. [31] [32]

Tournament history

Pakistan Team at ICC Women's Cricket World Cup in Sydney, March 2009. Pakistan Womens Cricket Team.jpg
Pakistan Team at ICC Women's Cricket World Cup in Sydney, March 2009.

A red box around the year indicates tournaments played within Pakistan

World Cup

World Cup record
YearRoundPositionGPWLTNR
Flag of England.svg 1973 Did not participate
Flag of India.svg 1978
Flag of New Zealand.svg 1982
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 1988
Flag of England.svg 1993
Flag of India.svg 1997 Round 111/1150500
Flag of New Zealand.svg 2000 Did not participate
Flag of South Africa.svg 2005 Did not qualify
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2009 Super Sixes5/872500
Flag of India.svg 2013 Round 18/840400
Flag of England.svg 2017 70700
Total4/110 Titles2322100

World T20

World Twenty20 record
YearRoundPositionGPWLTNR
Flag of England.svg 2009 Round 18/830300
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg 2010 30300
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg 2012 7/831200
Flag of Bangladesh.svg 2014 8/1041300
Flag of India.svg 2016 6/1042200
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg 2018 8/1041300
Flag of Australia (converted).svg 2020 7/1041201
Total7/70 Titles2561801

Asia Cup

One-Day Internationals

Asia Cup record
YearRoundPositionGPWLTNR
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg 2004 Did not participate
Flag of Pakistan.svg 2005–06 Round 13/340400
Flag of India.svg 2006 Round 140400
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg 2008 Round 13/461500
Total3/40 Titles1411300

Twenty20 Internationals

Asia Cup record
YearRoundPositionGPWLTNR
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2012 Runners-up2/853200
Flag of Thailand.svg 2016 2/664200
Flag of Malaysia.svg 2018 Group League3/653200
Total3/30 Titles1610600

Asian Games

Asian Games
YearRoundPositionGPWLTNR
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg 2010 Champions1/844000
Flag of South Korea.svg 2014 1/1033000
Total2/22 Titles77000

Honours

Asian Games  :

Gold medal (2) : Guangzhou 2010, Incheon 2014

Squad

This lists all the players who have played for Pakistan since May 2019 and the forms in which they have played. Updated as of 3 Feb 2021.

NameAgeBatting styleBowling styleContractForms
Captain and Batter
Bismah Maroof 30Left-handedRight-arm leg break AODI, T20I
Batters
Omaima Sohail 24Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast CODI, T20I
Javeria Khan 33Right-handedRight-arm off break AODI, T20I
Nahida Khan 34Right-handedRight-arm medium CODI, T20I
Sidra Ameen 29Right-handedRight-arm medium -ODI, T20I
Iram Javed 29Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast -ODI, T20I
Ayesha Zafar 26Right-handedRight-arm leg break -ODI, T20I
Ayesha Naseem 16Right-handedRight-arm medium EmergingT20I
Kaynat Hafeez 25Right-handedRight-arm off break EmergingODI
Javeria Rauf 32Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast -T20I
All-rounders
Aliya Riaz 28Right-handedRight-arm medium BODI, T20I
Nida Dar 34Right-handedRight-arm off break CODI, T20I
Kainat Imtiaz 29Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast CODI, T20I
Wicket-keeper
Sidra Nawaz 27Right-handed-BODI, T20I
Muneeba Ali 23Right-handed-EmergingODI, T20I
Spin Bowlers
Nashra Sandhu 23Right-handed Slow left-arm orthodox CODI, T20I
Anam Amin 28Right-handed Slow left-arm orthodox CODI, T20I
Sadia Iqbal 25Left-handed Slow left-arm orthodox EmergingODI, T20I
Syeda Aroob Shah 17Right-handedRight-arm leg break EmergingODI, T20I
Rameen Shamim 25Left-handedRight-arm off break EmergingODI, T20I
Saba Nazir 28Right-handedRight-arm off break EmergingT20I
Pace Bowlers
Diana Baig 25Right-handedRight-arm medium BODI, T20I
Fatima Sana 19Right-handedRight-arm medium EmergingODI, T20I
Aiman Anwer 29Right-handedRight-arm medium-fast -ODI, T20I


Former players

Records and Statistics

International Match Summary — Pakistan Women [33] [34] [35]

Last updated 18 July 2021

Playing Record
FormatMWLTNRInaugural Match
Women's Test3020117 April 1998
Women's One-Day Internationals173501191328 January 1997
Women's Twenty20 Internationals12348703225 May 2009

Women's Test cricket

Women's Test record versus other nations [33]

Records complete to Women's Test #122. Last updated 18 March 2004.

OpponentMatchesWonLostTiedDrawFirst matchFirst win
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 1010030–31 July 200030–31 July 2000
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 1010017–20 April 199817–20 April 1998
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 1000115–18 March 2004

Women's One-Day International

WODI record versus other nations [34]

Records complete to WODI #1205. Last updated 18 July 2021.

OpponentMatchesWonLostTiedN/RFirst matchFirst win
ICC Full members
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 12012007 February 1997
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 10640020 August 201220 August 2012
Flag of England.svg  England 110100112 December 1997
Flag of India.svg  India 100100030 December 2005
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 181260018 December 199718 February 2008
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 131120028 January 199712 December 1997
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 244181116 December 199724 November 2011
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 309210011 April 199821 April 2011
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 309210025 July 200325 March 2004
ICC Associate members
Flag of Denmark.svg  Denmark 1010010 December 1997
Flag of Japan.svg  Japan 1100021 July 200321 July 2003
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1274019 April 20019 April 2001
Flag of Scotland.svg  Scotland 1100022 July 200322 July 2003

Women's T20I cricket

WT20I record versus other nations [35]

Records complete to WT20I #912. Last updated 4 July 2021.

OpponentMatchesWonLostTiedN/RFirst matchFirst win
ICC Full members
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 100100029 September 2012
Flag of Bangladesh.svg  Bangladesh 151410029 August 201229 August 2012
Flag of England.svg  England 141130016 June 20095 July 2013
Flag of India.svg  India 11290013 June 20091 October 2012
Cricket Ireland flag.svg  Ireland 141220025 May 200928 May 2009
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 8080010 May 2010
Flag of South Africa.svg  South Africa 187110016 October 201019 January 2014
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg  Sri Lanka 13660112 June 200916 January 2015
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg  West Indies 16310306 September 201110 September 2011
ICC Associate members
Flag of Malaysia.svg  Malaysia 110007 June 20187 June 2018
Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 1100024 April 201124 April 2011
Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 210013 June 20183 June 2018

Note: Pakistan Women lost all 3 tied matches against West Indies in Super Over.

See also

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Further reading