Philipstown, New York

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Philipstown
Philipstown, NY, town hall.jpg
Town hall
Etymology: Early local landowners, the Philipse family
Putnam County New York incorporated and unincorporated areas Philipstown highlighted.svg
Location of Philipstown, New York
New York in United States (US48).svg
Location of New York in the United States
Coordinates: 41°25′22″N73°57′2″W / 41.42278°N 73.95056°W / 41.42278; -73.95056 Coordinates: 41°25′22″N73°57′2″W / 41.42278°N 73.95056°W / 41.42278; -73.95056
CountryUnited States
State New York
County Putnam
Founded1788
Government
  Town supervisorRichard R. Shea
Area
[1]
  Total51.57 sq mi (133.56 km2)
  Land48.78 sq mi (126.35 km2)
  Water2.79 sq mi (7.21 km2)
Elevation
200 ft (60 m)
Lowest elevation
0 ft (0 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total9,662
  Estimate 
(2016) [2]
9,669
  Density198.20/sq mi (76.52/km2)
Time zone UTC-5
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (Eastern Daylight Time)
ZIP code
10516 and 10524
Area code(s) 845
FIPS code 36-079-57584
FIPS code 36-57584
GNIS feature ID0979363
Wikimedia CommonsPhilipstown, New York
Website Town of Philipstown
Map of the Philipse Patent showing the holdings of Philip Philipse, Susanna Philipse, and Mary Philipse Map of Philipse Patent (showing the Oblong and Gore).png
Map of the Philipse Patent showing the holdings of Philip Philipse, Susanna Philipse, and Mary Philipse

Philipstown is a town located in the western part of Putnam County, New York, United States. The population was 9,662 at the 2010 census. [3]

Contents

History

In 1697 Adolphus Philipse, a wealthy Province of New York landowner and merchant, purchased a tract from Dutch traders which received British Royal sanction as the Highland Patent. Comprising roughly 250 square miles, it extended approximately 13 miles along the east shore of the Hudson River, from Annsville Creek to the Fishkill Creek, and eastward some 20 or so miles to the border of the Colony of Connecticut. [4]

Philipstown was first settled in the westernmost of this parcel in around 1715. In 1754 the Highland Patent, subsequently known as the Philipse Patent, was divided among Philipse heirs into nine parcels. [5] In 1788 Philipstown was established out of the three river lots and part of a fourth inland to the north, becoming one of the three original towns in what is now Putnam County. In 1806 a very small portion north of the Hudson Highlands by the mouth of Fishkill Creek was split off from Philipstown and given to the Town of Fishkill. [6]

Philipstown's main population centers are the village of Cold Spring, the hamlet of Garrison, and the village of Nelsonville. In 1806, part of the town was used to form the town of Fishkill. Putnam Valley was part of Philipstown until 1839, and a small portion of the town north of Putnam Valley was transferred to Kent in 1877.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 51.5 square miles (133 km2), of which 48.8 square miles (126 km2) is land and 2.7 square miles (7.0 km2), or 5.22%, is water.

The western border of Philipstown is the Hudson River, with the Orange County towns of Highlands and Cornwall, as well as a small sliver of Stony Point in Rockland County, on the opposite shore. The north town line borders the Dutchess County towns of Fishkill and East Fishkill, with the south town line bordering the Westchester County town of Cortlandt. Kent and Putnam Valley border the town on its east side.

Media

Philipstown has two weekly newspapers: The Highlands Current, founded in 2010 and published on Friday, and the Putnam County News & Recorder, founded in 1868 and published on Wednesday.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1820 3,733
1830 4,81629.0%
1840 3,814−20.8%
1850 5,06332.7%
1860 4,526−10.6%
1870 5,11713.1%
1880 4,375−14.5%
1890 4,113−6.0%
1900 4,64212.9%
1910 5,34515.1%
1920 3,272−38.8%
1930 3,98221.7%
1940 4,2466.6%
1950 4,3322.0%
1960 5,91836.6%
1970 7,71730.4%
1980 9,15518.6%
1990 9,2421.0%
2000 9,4221.9%
2010 9,6622.5%
2016 (est.)9,669 [2] 0.1%
U.S. Decennial Census [7]

As of the census [8] of 2010, there were 9,662 people, 3,685 households, and 2,591 families residing in the town. The population density was 198.0 people per square mile (74.5/km2). There were 4,164 housing units at an average density of 85.3 per square mile (31.5/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 93.1% White, 1.6% African American, 0.2% Native American, 1.4% Asian, 1.6% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.9% of the population.

There were 3,685 households, out of which 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.2% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.7% were non-families. 23.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the town, the population was spread out, with 28.1% under the age of 20, 3.8% from 20 to 24, 21.3% from 25 to 44, 35.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.9 males.

As of 2016, the median income for a household in the town was $102,097, and the median income for a family was $127,034. Males had a median income of $84,313 versus $64,348 for females. The per capita income for the town was $52,755. About 5.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.9% of those under age 18 and 4.3 of those age 65 or over.

Government and emergency services

Philipstown is governed by a town board. The town hall is located at 238 Main Street (New York State Route 301) in Cold Spring, New York. Primary law enforcement services in Philipstown are provided by the New York State Police and the Putnam County Sheriff's Department. The village of Cold Spring has its own police department. Fire and medical emergency services are provided by the Continental Village Fire Department, the Garrison Fire Department, the North Highlands Fire Department, and the Village of Cold Spring Fire Department.

Communities and locations in Philipstown

The Hudson Highlands in Philipstown are one of Putnam County's top scenic features Sugarloaf Hill Hudson Highlands from Bear Mountain Bridge.JPG
The Hudson Highlands in Philipstown are one of Putnam County's top scenic features

See also

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Cold Spring, New York Village in New York, United States

Cold Spring is a village in the town of Philipstown in Putnam County, New York, United States. The population was 2,013 at the 2010 census. It borders the smaller village of Nelsonville and the hamlet of Garrison. The central area of the village is on the National Register of Historic Places as the Cold Spring Historic District due to its many well-preserved 19th-century buildings, constructed to accommodate workers at the nearby West Point Foundry. The town is the birthplace of General Gouverneur K. Warren, who was an important figure in the Union Army during the Civil War. The village, located in the Hudson Highlands, sits at the deepest point of the Hudson River, directly across from West Point. Cold Spring serves as a weekend getaway for many residents of New York City.

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Nelsonville, New York Village in New York, United States

Nelsonville is a village located in the town of Philipstown in Putnam County, New York, United States. The population was 628 at the time of the 2010 census.

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Frederick Philipse

Frederick Philipse, first Lord of the Manor of Philipseborough (Philipsburg) and patriarch of the Philipse family, was a Dutch immigrant to North America of Bohemian heritage. Beginning in 1672 Philipse and some partners started acquiring land in what was to become lower Westchester County, New York. When the British took over the Dutch colony in 1674, Philipse pledged his allegiance to the Crown and was rewarded with a title and manorship for his holdings, which ultimately grew to some 81 sq mi (210 km2) (210 km²).

The Hudson Highlands Multiple Resource Area is a Multiple Property Submission study supporting multiple listings in 1982 to the United States National Register of Historic Places. It originally included 58 properties spread over the counties of Dutchess, Putnam, Westchester, Orange and Rockland.

Adolphus Philipse

Adolphus Philipse (1665–1750) was a wealthy landowner of Dutch descent in the Province of New York. In 1697 he purchased a large tract of land along the east bank of the Hudson River stretching all the way to the east to the Connecticut border. Then known as the "Highland Patent" it became in time referred to as the Philipse Patent. After his death the Patent was inherited by his nephew, Frederick Philipse II, his only heir-at-law, who became the second Lord of the Manor of Philipsborough in Westchester County.

Philipse Patent

The Philipse Patent was a British royal patent for a large tract of land on the east bank of the Hudson River about 50 miles north of New York City. It was purchased in 1697 by Adolphus Philipse, a wealthy landowner of Dutch descent in the Province of New York, and in time became today's Putnam County.

Frederick Philipse II

Frederick Philipse II, was a colonial American merchant, landowner, and politician. Philipse was the only son of Maria Sparkes, daughter of the Governor of Barbados, and Philip Philipse, eldest son of Frederick Philipse I, 1st Lord of the Philipsburg Manor. Philip predeceased his father, and family lands passed on to younger son Adolphus Philipse. Upon his uncle's death Frederick II inherited his share of Philipse lands and commercial interests, thereafter becoming the elder Philipse male and 2nd Lord of Philipsburg Manor.

Margaret Philipse (1733–1752)

Margaret Philipse was the daughter of Frederick Philipse II, 2nd Lord of Philipsburg Manor of Westchester County, New York.

Philip Philipse (1724–1768)

Philip Philipse (1724–1768) was the second son of Frederick Philipse II, 2nd Lord of Philipsburg Manor of Westchester County, New York. He was, along with his sisters Susanna (1727–1822), Mary (1730–1825), and Margaret (1733-1752), a one-quarter heir to the roughly 250 sq mi (650 km2) "Highland Patent" of his father.

References

  1. "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 5, 2017.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  3. "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Philipstown town, Putnam County, New York". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved June 14, 2012.
  4. Smith, Philip Henry, General History of Putnam County: From 1609 to 1876, inclusive, published by the author, Pawling, NY, 1877, p. 44
  5. French's Gazetteer of the State of New York (1860): “The Philipses Patent… divided among the remaining three [children] Philip… Susannah married to Beverley Robinson, and Mary married to Col. Roger Morris. On the 7th of Feb 1754, the patent was divided into 9 lots: 3, each 4 mi. square, bordering upon the Hudson and denominated ‘water lots;’ 3, each 4 mi. wide by 12 long, extending N. and S. across the patent, and denominated ‘long lots;’ 3, each 4 mi. square, upon the E. border denominated ‘back lots.’ Philip, Susannah and Mary Philipse each owned one of each kind of lots.
  6. Boundary changes of Putnam County
  7. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  8. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.