Putnam Valley, New York

Last updated
Putnam Valley, New York
Nickname(s): 
Town of Lakes
Putnam County New York incorporated and unincorporated areas Putnam Valley highlighted.svg
Location of Putnam Valley in New York
Coordinates: 41°22′52″N73°50′58″W / 41.38111°N 73.84944°W / 41.38111; -73.84944
Country United States
State New York
County Putnam
Area
[1]
  Total42.78 sq mi (110.80 km2)
  Land41.17 sq mi (106.64 km2)
  Water1.60 sq mi (4.16 km2)
Elevation
564 ft (172 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total11,809
  Estimate 
(2016) [2]
11,616
  Density282.11/sq mi (108.93/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (Eastern (EST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP code
10579
Area code(s) 845
FIPS code 36-60147
GNIS feature ID0979403
Website http://www.putnamvalley.com

Putnam Valley is a town in Putnam County, New York, United States. The population was 11,809 at the 2010 census. [3] Its location is northeast of New York City, in the southwest part of Putnam County. Many residents of Putnam Valley commute to New York City daily for work or recreational purposes (Midtown Manhattan is around a forty five to fifty minute drive). Putnam Valley calls itself the "Town of Lakes".

Contents

History

The retreating glaciers of the last ice age did much to shape the landscape of Putnam Valley, including the shearing of hills to expose springs (creating, for example Bryant Pond) and leaving the glacial deposits of stone and large boulders. The current area of Putnam Valley was occupied by paleo-Indians followed by the historic Wappinger Indians who lived by the many lakes. Dutch and English farmers moved into the area toward the end of the 17th Century. [4]

In 1697, the Highland Patent was granted to Adolph Philipse. The first settlers arrived around 1740. In 1745 the Smith property was sold to the Bryant family, who renamed their pond Bryant Pond and the nearby hill, Bryant Hill. The Smith family homestead is the oldest house in Putnam Valley, located just east of the Taconic Parkway on Bryant Pond Road.

Putnam Valley incorporated in 1839 as the town of Quincy, when it was separated from the town of Philipstown, and it took the name "Putnam Valley" in 1840, possibly because local inhabitants were not favorably impressed by John Quincy Adams. [4]

In 1861, a small part of the town of Carmel was added to Putnam Valley.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 43.0 square miles (111 km2), of which 41.4 square miles (107 km2) is land and 1.6 square miles (4.1 km2), or 3.72%, is water. 14,089 acres of Clarence Fahnestock State Park lies within the boundaries of Putnam Valley and 1,000 acres is owned by the Hudson Highlands Land Trust, an environmental preservation trust in the Hudson Valley [5]

The south town line is the border of Westchester County.

The Taconic State Parkway passes through the eastern part of the town.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1840 1,659
1850 1,626−2.0%
1860 1,587−2.4%
1870 1,566−1.3%
1880 1,555−0.7%
1890 1,193−23.3%
1900 1,034−13.3%
1910 924−10.6%
1920 704−23.8%
1930 85922.0%
1940 1,18738.2%
1950 1,90860.7%
1960 3,07060.9%
1970 5,20969.7%
1980 8,99472.7%
1990 9,0941.1%
2000 10,68617.5%
2010 11,80910.5%
2016 (est.)11,616 [2] −1.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [6]
Tompkins Corners United Methodist Church in Putnam Valley. Tompkins Corners United Methodist Church, Putnam Valley, NY.jpg
Tompkins Corners United Methodist Church in Putnam Valley.

At the 2000 census, [7] there were 10,686 people, 3,676 households and 2,874 families residing in the town. The population density was 258.2 per square mile (99.7/km2). There were 4,253 housing units at an average density of 102.7 per square mile (39.7/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 94.54% White, 1.60% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.85% Asian, 1.28% from other races, and 1.53% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.28% of the population.

There were 3,676 households, of which 39.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.1% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.8% were non-families. 17.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.28.

Age distribution was 26.7% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 8.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.2 males.

The median household income was $72,938, and the median family income was $82,576. Males had a median income of $56,976 versus $36,875 for females. The per capita income for the town was $31,215. About 2.7% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.4% of those under age 18 and 1.7% of those age 65 or over.

Education

The Putnam Valley Central School District operates three schools: Putnam Valley Elementary School starting at kindergarten, Putnam Valley Middle School starting at 5th grade, and Putnam Valley High School starting at 9th grade. [8] The district was created in 1934, and was dedicated in 1935. [9]

The high school is the most recent addition to the district, being built in 2000. It uses geothermal energy for heating and cooling, has three computer labs, a performing arts center and wireless Internet access in all classrooms. Before the high school was built, Putnam Valley students were previously sent to neighboring town high schools including Lakeland High School in Shrub Oak, Peekskill High School or Walter Panas High School, all of which are in Westchester County. [4]

Grades 5 through 12, every student is issued an Apple laptop or Chromebook, Apple laptops are guaranteed to be given to those in 9th grade and above. A program that sets the school apart from others in the area. The Putnam Valley High School's laptop agreement form reads, "Putnam Valley Central School District issues computers and school monitored email accounts as one way of furthering its mission to teach the skills, knowledge, responsibilities, and behaviors that students will need as successful and responsible adults". [10]

Government

The Town of Putnam Valley is governed by a town board. The town board consists of a Supervisor, Sam Oliverio, Jr. and four town board members: Jacqueline Annabi, Louie Luongo, Ralph Smith, and Wendy Whetsel. [11] The town hall is located at 265 Oscawana Lake Road in Putnam Valley. Law enforcement services for Putnam Valley are provided by the New York State Police and the Putnam County Sheriff's Department. Fire protection is provided by the Putnam Valley Volunteer Fire Department, and medical emergencies are served by Putnam Valley Ambulance Corp Volunteers.

Communities and locations in Putnam Valley

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Tompkins Corners United Methodist Church

Tompkins Corners United Methodist Church - now known as the Tompkins Corners Cultural Center - is located along Peekskill Hollow Road in Putnam Valley, New York, United States. It is a wooden frame structure built in the 1890s. In 1983 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the only property exclusively in Putnam Valley to so far receive that distinction.

References

  1. "2016 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved Jul 5, 2017.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  3. "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (DP-1): Putnam Valley town, Putnam County, New York". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved June 14, 2012.
  4. 1 2 3 Raskyn, Terry (18 March 1990). "If You're Thinking of Living in: Putnam Valley". The New York Times.
  5. Hodara, Susan (6 February 2019). "Putnam Valley, N.Y.: Quiet, Rustic and Old-Timey". The New York Times.
  6. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  7. "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  8. https://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/14/realestate/14livi.html
  9. https://putnamvalleyhistory.org/about/
  10. http://pvcsd.org/HS/resources/pdf/2017-2018_Laptop_and_Mobile_Device_Loan_Agreement.pdf
  11. http://www.putnamvalley.com/town-board/

Coordinates: 41°20′09″N73°52′26″W / 41.33583°N 73.87389°W / 41.33583; -73.87389