Sixteen-segment display

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A sixteen-segment display on a Beatmania IIDX arcade machine. IIDX 16seg display.jpg
A sixteen-segment display on a Beatmania IIDX arcade machine.
The individual segments of a sixteen-segment display. 16-segmente.png
The individual segments of a sixteen-segment display.
Arabic numerals and letters of the ISO basic Latin alphabet on a typical 16-segment display. Sixteen-segment display animated.gif
Arabic numerals and letters of the ISO basic Latin alphabet on a typical 16-segment display.

A sixteen-segment display (SISD) is a type of display based on 16 segments that can be turned on or off to produce a graphic pattern. It is an extension of the more common seven-segment display, adding four diagonal and two vertical segments and splitting the three horizontal segments in half. Other variants include the fourteen-segment display which does not split the top or bottom horizontal segments, and the twenty two-segment display [1] that allows lower-case characters with descenders.

Contents

Often a character generator is used to translate 7-bit ASCII character codes to the 16 bits that indicate which of the 16 segments to turn on or off. [2]

History

Sixteen-segment displays were originally designed to display alphanumeric characters (Latin letters and Arabic digits). Later they were used to display Thai numerals [3] and Persian characters. [4] Non-electronic displays using this pattern existed as early as 1902. [5]

Before the advent of inexpensive dot-matrix displays, sixteen and fourteen-segment displays were some of the few options available for producing alphanumeric characters on calculators and other embedded systems. However, they are still sometimes used on VCRs, car stereos, microwave ovens, telephone Caller ID displays, and slot machine readouts.

Sixteen-segment displays may be based on one of several technologies, the three most common optoelectronics types being LED, LCD and VFD. The LED variant is typically manufactured in single or dual character packages, to be combined as needed into text line displays of a suitable length for the application in question; they can also be stacked to build multiline displays.

As with seven and fourteen-segment displays, a decimal point and/or comma may be present as an additional segment, or pair of segments; the comma (used for triple-digit groupings or as a decimal separator in many regions) is commonly formed by combining the decimal point with a closely 'attached' leftwards-descending arc-shaped segment. This way, a point or comma may be displayed between character positions instead of occupying a whole position by itself, which would be the case if employing the bottom middle vertical segment as a point and the bottom left diagonal segment as a comma. Such displays were very common on pinball machines for displaying the score and other information, before the widespread use of dot-matrix display panels.

See also

7, 9, 14, 16 segment displays shown side by side. Common segment displays.svg
7, 9, 14, 16 segment displays shown side by side.

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A seven-segment display is a form of electronic display device for displaying decimal numerals that is an alternative to the more complex dot matrix displays.

Fourteen-segment display

A fourteen-segment display (FSD) is a type of display based on 14 segments that can be turned on or off to produce letters and numerals. It is an expansion of the more common seven-segment display, having an additional four diagonal and two vertical segments with the middle horizontal segment broken in half. A seven-segment display suffices for numerals and certain letters, but unambiguously rendering the ISO basic Latin alphabet requires more detail. A slight variation is the sixteen-segment display which allows additional legibility in displaying letters or other symbols.

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Seven-segment display character representations

The topic of seven-segment display character representations revolves around the various shapes of numerical digits, letters, and punctuation devisable on seven-segment displays. Such representation of characters is not standardized by any relevant entity.

A text display is an electronic alphanumeric display device that is mainly or only capable of showing text, or extremely limited graphic characters. This includes electromechanical split-flap displays, vane displays, and flip-disc displays; all-electronic liquid-crystal displays, incandescent eggcrate displays, LED displays, and vacuum fluorescent displays; and even electric nixie tubes.

Digital number may refer to:

References

  1. "DL-3422 4-digit 22-segment alphanumeric Intelligent Display™ preliminary data sheet". Internet Archive. Litronix 1982 Optoelectronics Catalog. p. 82. Retrieved 3 September 2016.
  2. Application Note 3212: Driving 16-Segment Displays, Maxim Integrated, 2004.
  3. Standard sixteen segmented display for Thai numerals, IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics, Volume 35 Issue 4 1989
  4. Alphanumeric Persian characters using standard 16-segment displays, IEEE Transactions on Consumer Electronics Volume 37 No. 1, 1991
  5. Means for controlling illuminated announcement and display signals, US Patent 744,923 filed 1902-08-15