Skinningrove

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Skinningrove
Skinningrove - geograph.org.uk - 970506.jpg
North Yorkshire UK location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Skinningrove
Location within North Yorkshire
Population460  [1]
OS grid reference NZ711199
Civil parish
Unitary authority
Ceremonial county
Region
Country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town SALTBURN-BY-THE-SEA
Postcode district TS13
Police Cleveland
Fire Cleveland
Ambulance North East
UK Parliament
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
54°34′12″N0°54′00″W / 54.570000°N 0.900000°W / 54.570000; -0.900000 Coordinates: 54°34′12″N0°54′00″W / 54.570000°N 0.900000°W / 54.570000; -0.900000

Skinningrove is a village in Redcar and Cleveland, North Yorkshire, England. Its name is Viking influenced and is thought to mean skinners' grove or pit. [2]

Contents

History

The village had an agricultural and fishing economy until the opening of local ironstone workings in 1848 initiated an industrialisation boom. A railway was built by 1865, and iron smelting began in 1874. A jetty on the coast built in 1880 allowed seagoing vessels to carry heavy cargoes from the area. Mining continued until 1958 and primary iron production until the 1970s. [1]

Oarfish

Skinningrove showing the North Sea in the background Skinningrove.jpg
Skinningrove showing the North Sea in the background

On 17 February 2003, a rarely seen oarfish was caught by angler Val Fletcher, using a fishing rod baited with squid. [3] The fish was 11 ft 4 in (3.3 m) long and weighed 140 lb (63.5 kg). Graham Hill, the science officer at the Deep, an aquarium in Hull, said that he had never heard of another oarfish being caught off the coast of Britain. The Natural History Museum in London said that it would have been interested in preserving the fish in its permanent collection; however the fish had been 'cut up into steaks' before any scientists could examine it.

Landmarks

Beach of Skinningrove Skinningrove beach - looking west - geograph.org.uk - 1525983.jpg
Beach of Skinningrove

The Cleveland Ironstone Mining Museum (formerly the Tom Leonard Mining Museum) describes the village's mining heritage, providing a unique underground experience and an insight into how 6.2 million tons of ironstone was extracted from Skinningrove. The village has a large natural sand beach used for recreational fishing and a beck, which occasionally floods, notably in 2000. It also has the Riverside Building Community Centre which is on the site of a former school. There is a Methodist chapel which has services on a Sunday at 18:00. There is also a fish and chip shop, a community centre and general dealers and post office.

Culture and events

Every year Skinningrove hosts a bonfire and fireworks display which attracts hundreds of people from around North Yorkshire. Each year the bonfire is based on a different theme. The Cleveland Way runs through the village. [4]

Photographer Chris Killip created an unpublished photo series about the town's residents in the early 1980s, about which the American filmmaker Michael Almereyda produced a short film. The film won Best Non-Fiction Short at the 2012 Sundance Film Festival. [5]

Related Research Articles

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Eston Town in North Yorkshire, England

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Loftus, North Yorkshire Town and civil parish in North Yorkshire, England

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Lingdale is a village in the unitary authority of Redcar and Cleveland and the ceremonial county of North Yorkshire, England. The village was created with the advent of ironstone mining in the area, in the early 19th century.

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Skinningrove railway station Former railway station in the North Riding of Yorkshire, England

Skinningrove railway station was on the Whitby, Redcar and Middlesbrough Union Railway. It was opened on 1 April 1875, and served the villages of Skinningrove and Carlin How in North Yorkshire, England. It was originally named "Carlin How", but was renamed on 1 October 1903 by the North Eastern Railway. It had no goods service, but a zig zag track branched off just outside the station from a point on the main line towards Saltburn, serving the Loftus Mines in the valley below, where ironstone was mined. This closed in 1958. Further north towards Brotton, near the village of Carlin How, the tracks serving Skinningrove Steelworks branch off the line.

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Eston Nab is a local landmark to those who live along the River Tees, in north-east England.

John Marley (mining engineer)

John Marley was an English mining engineer from Darlington who together with ironmaster John Vaughan made the "commercial discovery" of the Cleveland Ironstone Formation, the basis of the wealth of their company Bolckow Vaughan and the industrial growth of Middlesbrough. He was an effective leader of engineering operations at Bolckow Vaughan's mines and collieries. He ended his career as a wealthy independent mine-owner and president of the North of England Institute of Mining and Mechanical Engineers (NEIMME).

Skinningrove steelworks is a steel mill in Skinningrove, North Yorkshire, England. The business was formed in 1874 as the Loftus Iron Company, after a liquidation of the company reformed in 1880 as the Skinningrove Iron Company. The works expanded from producing only pig iron to include steel production in the early 20th century, with mills specialising in long products including railway rail. As part of the business the company constructed a jetty at Skinningrove, and owned an ironstone mine in Loftus.

Yorkshire coast fishery History of sea fishing in Yorkshire, England

The Yorkshire coast fishery has been a mainstay of the economy of the Yorkshire and Humber region for centuries. The fishing industry has been in decline since the mid to late 20th century due to many factors such as labour problems, fishing quotas and decommissioning schemes. Historically, the ports at Hull and Whitby have been important locations for the landing and processing of fish and shellfish. This industry continues today at both locations though on a smaller scale, and both have fish processing industries too. Bridlington has now become the largest shellfish port in Europe, regularly exporting its catch abroad, mostly to European countries.

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Grinkle Mine Former ironstone mine in North Yorkshire, England

Grinkle Mine, was an ironstone mine working the main Cleveland Seam near to Roxby in North Yorkshire, England. Initially, the ironstone was mined specifically for the furnaces at the Palmer Shipbuilders in Jarrow on the River Tyne, but later, the mine became independent of Palmers. To enable the output from the mine to be exported, a 3-mile (4.8 km) narrow-gauge tramway was constructed that ran across three viaducts and through two tunnels to the harbour of Port Mulgrave, where ships would take the ore directly to Tyneside.

North Skelton Mine Disused ironstone mine in Cleveland, England

North Skelton Mine was an ironstone mine in the village of North Skelton in North Yorkshire, England. The mine was the deepest of the ironstone mines in Cleveland and was also the last to close, which came in January 1964. Some buildings still exist on the surface as well as spoil heaps.

References

  1. 1 2 "Skinningrove Conservation Area Appraisal" (PDF). Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council. March 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on 12 June 2011.
  2. "Lingdale in North Yorkshire". This is the North East. Northumbia University. Archived from the original on 3 December 2012. Retrieved 4 October 2010.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  3. Jenkins, Russell (21 February 2003). "Woman angler lands legendary sea monster". The Times. London. Retrieved 25 February 2010. The novice angler fishing off the rocks for mackerel thought that she must have hooked a big one. Unfortunately the oarfish has been cut up into steaks for the pot.
  4. "Skinningrove at Digital Village". East Cleveland Community Development Group in partnership with the University of Teesside. Retrieved 3 October 2010.
  5. "Chris Killip: Skinningrove". The New York Review of Books. Retrieved 14 October 2020.