The King's Cup

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The King's Cup
"The King's Cup" (1933).jpg
Chili Bouchier & Harry Milton
Directed by Donald Macardle
Herbert Wilcox
Robert Cullen
Alan Cobham (Flying Scenes Co-ordinator)
Produced byHerbert Wilcox
Written byAlan Cobham
Starring Chili Bouchier
Harry Milton
William Kendall
Music by Lew Stone
Cinematography Freddie Young
Production
company
Herbert Wilcox Productions (for) British & Dominions Film Corporation
Distributed by Woolf & Freedman Film Service (Uk)
Release date
  • January 1933 (1933-01)
Running time
76 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

The King's Cup is a 1933 British drama film directed by Alan Cobham, Donald Macardle, Herbert Wilcox and Robert Cullen and starring Chili Bouchier, Harry Milton and William Kendall. [1] The film is named after the King's Cup Air Race, established by King George V in 1922 as an endurance race across Britain, to encourage development in engine design and the sport of aviation. Stars Chili Bouchier and Harry Milton were married at the time the film was made. [2]

Contents

Plot summary

A pilot who has lost his nerve following an accident regains it after meeting a woman and goes on to win a major air race.

Cast

Critical reception

TV Guide gave the film one out of four stars, and wrote, "the novelty of four directors did nothing out of the ordinary in terms of what appears on the screen." [3] while The Cinema Museum noted "a tantalizing glimpse of the (Brooklands) airfield and some of the flying that took place there before the Second World War." [2]

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References

  1. BFI | Film & TV Database | The KING'S CUP (1933). Ftvdb.bfi.org.uk (16 April 2009).
  2. 1 2 "The Cinema Museum and Brooklands Museum present The King's Cup (1933) » The Cinema Museum, London".
  3. "The King's Cup".