Thomas Sloan Boyd House

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Thomas Sloan Boyd House
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Location 220 Park Avenue,
Lonoke, Arkansas
Coordinates 34°46′55″N91°54′7″W / 34.78194°N 91.90194°W / 34.78194; -91.90194 Coordinates: 34°46′55″N91°54′7″W / 34.78194°N 91.90194°W / 34.78194; -91.90194
Area less than one acre
Built c. 1873 (1873)
Architect Boyd, T. S.
Architectural style Other
NRHP reference # 76000430 [1]
Added to NRHP January 1, 1976

The Thomas Sloan Boyd House (also known as the Boyd-Barton House) is a historic house located at 220 Park Avenue in Lonoke, Arkansas.

Lonoke, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Lonoke is the second most populous city in Lonoke County, Arkansas, United States, and serves as its county seat. According to 2010 United States Census, the population of the city is 4,245. It is part of the Little Rock–North Little Rock–Conway Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Contents

Description and history

It is a T-shaped, two-story brick structure, built out of locally-made bricks in about 1873 by Thomas Sloan Boyd, a local farmer. A full-height porch extends across the facade, supported by square brick columns, added in 1913. It is the oldest brick building in the city. [2]

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on January 1, 1976. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Lonoke County, Arkansas Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Lonoke County, Arkansas.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Thomas Sloan Boyd House" (PDF). Arkansas Preservation. Retrieved 2015-12-25.