Thomas Walker House

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Thomas Walker House
Thomas Walker House.JPG
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Location 201 N. Spring St., Hardy, Arkansas
Coordinates 36°18′52″N91°28′57″W / 36.31444°N 91.48250°W / 36.31444; -91.48250 Coordinates: 36°18′52″N91°28′57″W / 36.31444°N 91.48250°W / 36.31444; -91.48250
Area less than one acre
Built 1925 (1925)
Architectural style Bungalow/craftsman
MPS Hardy, Arkansas MPS
NRHP reference # 04001490 [1]
Added to NRHP January 20, 2005

The Thomas Walker House is a historic house at 201 North Spring Street in Hardy, Arkansas. Built in 1925, this 1-1/2 story stone structure is a particularly fine local example of Craftsman style. It is fashioned out of rough-cut local fieldstone, and has a prominent front porch supported by tapered square columns, and its low-pitch cross gable roof has exposed rafter ends. The interior retains period flooring, woodwork, and hardware. The house was built for Leonard Brophy, who only lived there a few years before selling it to Thomas Walker. [2]

Hardy, Arkansas City in Arkansas, United States

Hardy is a city in Sharp and Fulton counties in the U.S. state of Arkansas. The population was 772 at the 2010 census.

The house was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Sharp County, Arkansas Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Sharp County, Arkansas.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Thomas Walker House" (PDF). Arkansas Preservation. Retrieved 2015-01-11.