Thomaston Opera House

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Thomaston Opera House
Thomaston Opera House 323.jpg
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Location 153 Main St., Thomaston, Connecticut
Coordinates 41°40′23″N73°4′32″W / 41.67306°N 73.07556°W / 41.67306; -73.07556 Coordinates: 41°40′23″N73°4′32″W / 41.67306°N 73.07556°W / 41.67306; -73.07556
Area less than one acre
Built 1883 (1883)
NRHP reference # 72001319 [1]
Added to NRHP April 26, 1972

The Thomaston Opera House is a historic performance venue and the town hall of Thomaston, Connecticut. Located at 153 Main Street, it was built in 1883-85, and is a good local example of Romanesque architecture. The theater in the building has served as a performance and film venue since its construction. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972. [1] The opera house's principal tenant is now the Landmark Community Theatre.

Thomaston, Connecticut Town in Connecticut, United States

Thomaston is a town in Litchfield County, Connecticut, United States. The population was 7,887 at the 2010 census. The urban center of the town is the Thomaston census-designated place, with a population of 1,910 at the 2010 census.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Contents

Description and history

The Thomaston Opera House is prominently sited in Thomaston's downtown, at the southwest corner of Main and Clay Streets. It is a large three-story brick building with Romanesque features and a hip roof. Its dominant feature is a multi-stage square tower, rising through five levels to a clock stage, open belfry with triple-arched openings, and crowning pyramidal roof and weathervane. The roof cornice is adorned with dentil moulding and modillion blocks. The third-floor windows are set in round-arch openings with contrasting brick and stone arches. [2]

The building was designed by Robert Hill of Waterbury and built in 1883-85 on land donated by Aaron Thomas, the son of the town's namesake, Seth Thomas. It was used as a venue for theatrical performances and social events until the 1930s, when it was converted for a time into a movie house. It was closed down due to safety code violations in the 1960s, and underwent restoration, reopening with town offices on the first floor and the theater continuing on the upper floor. [2] It is now used for live theatrical productions and other events.

Waterbury, Connecticut City in Connecticut, United States

Waterbury is a city in the U.S. state of Connecticut on the Naugatuck River, 33 miles southwest of Hartford and 77 miles northeast of New York City. Waterbury is the second-largest city in New Haven County, Connecticut. As of the 2010 census, Waterbury had a population of 110,366, making it the 10th largest city in the New York Metropolitan Area, 9th largest city in New England and the 5th largest city in Connecticut.

Seth Thomas (clockmaker) American clockmaker

Seth Thomas was an American clockmaker and a pioneer of mass production at his Seth Thomas Clock Company.

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Litchfield County, Connecticut Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Litchfield County, Connecticut.

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