Thornthwaite Crag

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Thornthwaite Crag

Beacon on Thornthwaite Crag.jpg

Thornthwaite Crag’s 14-foot-high summit beacon with the fell of Froswick in the background.
Highest point
Elevation 784 m (2,572 ft)
Prominence c. 30 m
Parent peak High Street
Listing Wainwright, Nuttall, Hewitt
Coordinates 54°28′59″N2°52′42″W / 54.48305°N 2.8782°W / 54.48305; -2.8782 Coordinates: 54°28′59″N2°52′42″W / 54.48305°N 2.8782°W / 54.48305; -2.8782
Geography
Lake District National Park UK relief location map.png
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Thornthwaite Crag
Location in Lake District, UK
Location Cumbria, England
Parent range Lake District, Far Eastern Fells
OS grid NY432101
Topo map OS Explorer OL5, Explorer OL7

Thornthwaite Crag is a fell in the English Lake District, standing to the west of Haweswater Reservoir. It is a focal point of the Far Eastern Fells, standing at the head of several valleys.

Fell high and barren landscape feature

A fell is a high and barren landscape feature, such as a mountain range or moor-covered hills. The term is most often employed in Fennoscandia, the Isle of Man, parts of Northern England, and Scotland.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Lake District mountainous region in North West England

The Lake District, also known as the Lakes or Lakeland, is a mountainous region in North West England. A popular holiday destination, it is famous for its lakes, forests and mountains, and its associations with William Wordsworth and other Lake Poets and also with Beatrix Potter and John Ruskin. The National Park was established in 1951 and covers an area of 2,362 square kilometres. It was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2017.

Contents

Topography

The summit area is broadly horseshoe-shaped, concave to the north with the head of Hayeswater Gill in the opening. The north-western horn of the shoe connects to Gray Crag and the north-eastern ridge to High Street and Mardale Ill Bell. Two other principal ridges run south to Froswick and west to Caudale Moor.

Gray Crag mountain in United Kingdom

Gray Crag is a fell in the Lake District in Cumbria, England.

High Street (Lake District) fell in the English Lake District

High Street is a fell in the English Lake District. At 828 metres (2,718 ft), its summit is the highest point in the far eastern part of the national park. The fell is named after the Roman road which ran over the summit.

Mardale Ill Bell mountain in United Kingdom

Mardale Ill Bell is a fell in the English Lake District, rising to the south west of Haweswater Reservoir. It stands on the watershed between Mardale and Kentmere and is the highpoint of the south-eastern ridge of High Street, midway on its course to Harter Fell.

The north-eastern and southern ridges enclose the head of Kentmere with scree and crag predominating. To the south-west of Thornthwaite Crag is the craggy head of the long valley of Troutbeck, emptying into Windermere. Between the western and north-western ridges is the head of Pasture Beck, which ultimately joins Hayeswater Beck en route to Ullswater.

Kentmere farm village in the United Kingdom

Kentmere is a valley, village and civil parish in the Lake District National Park, a few miles from Kendal in the South Lakeland district of Cumbria, England. Historically in Westmorland, the parish has a population of 159 as of the 2011 Census.

Windermere largest natural lake in England

Windermere is the largest natural lake in England. It is a ribbon lake formed in a glacial trough after the retreat of ice at the start of the current interglacial period. It has been one of the country's most popular places for holidays and summer homes since the arrival of the Kendal and Windermere Railway's branch line in 1847. Historically forming part of the border between Lancashire and Westmorland, it is now within the county of Cumbria and the Lake District National Park.

Ullswater lake in the English Lake District

Ullswater is the second largest lake in the English Lake District, being approximately nine miles long and 0.75 miles wide with a maximum depth of slightly more than 60 metres (197 ft). Many regard Ullswater as the most beautiful of the English lakes; it has been compared to Lake Lucerne in Switzerland and it is a popular tourist destination. It is a typical Lake District narrow "ribbon lake" formed after the last ice age when a glacier scooped out the valley floor and when the glacier retreated, the deepened section filled with meltwater which became a lake. A total of three separate glaciers formed the lake. The surrounding mountains give Ullswater the shape of a stretched 'Z' with three distinct segments that wind their way through the surrounding hills.

The western ridge to Caudale Moor is narrow and rough, dropping very steeply to the depression of Threshwaite Mouth at 1,950 ft. The other ridges are broad and grassy, although there is some marshy ground when crossing the depression toward High Street. The southern ridge narrows considerably before reaching Froswick.

Summit

The grassy top is crossed by a stone wall which rises up from Threshwaite Mouth and then peters out a few hundred yards to the east of the summit. A section of old fenceposts then continues the boundary line toward High Street before again being replaced by stone wall. The actual top is marked by one of the most impressive columnar cairns in the district. Named Thornthwaite Beacon, it towers 14 feet above an angle in the wall. [1]

Cairn man-made pile of stones or burial monument

A cairn is a human-made pile of stones. The word cairn comes from the Scottish Gaelic: càrn[ˈkʰaːrˠn̪ˠ].

Ascents

The High Street Roman road reaches the summit plateau along the south ridge, but then detours east around the actual top, making a bee-line for the fell bearing its name. All of the connecting ridges carry good paths from the summit, which is an important walkers’ crossroads. The view is good, particularly westwards, although it can be improved by moving to the edge of the plateau in various directions. [1]

Thornthwaite Crag can be climbed direct from Hartsop via Pasture Beck and from Troutbeck via Scot Rake (the Roman road), or via Threshwaite Mouth. Various ascents from Kentmere are also possible.

Related Research Articles

Troutbeck Tongue mountain in United Kingdom

Troutbeck Tongue is a small fell located in the English Lake District, three miles ENE of Ambleside. It is one of 214 hills listed in Alfred Wainwright's Pictorial Guides to the Lakeland Fells, which makes it a popular attraction for walkers who are aiming to complete all the "Wainwrights". Because of its moderate height and proximity to a main road it is a pleasant half-day excursion that can be done when the higher fells are in cloud.

Stony Cove Pike mountain in the United Kingdom

Stony Cove Pike is a fell in the Far Eastern part of the English Lake District. It stands on the other side of the Kirkstone Pass from Red Screes, and is on the end of a ridge coming down from High Street. It is separated from its neighbours by the deep col of Threshthwaite Mouth, so is a Marilyn – the sixteenth highest in the Lake District.

Seatallan mountain in United Kingdom

Seatallan is a mountain in the western part of the English Lake District. It is rounded, grassy and fairly unassuming, occupying a large amount of land. However, it is classed as a Marilyn because of the low elevation of the col connecting it to Haycock, its nearest higher neighbour to the north. The name Seatallan is believed to have a Cumbric origin, meaning "Aleyn's high pasture".

Harter Fell (Mardale) mountain in United Kingdom

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Yoke (Lake District) mountain

Yoke is a fell in the Lake District in Cumbria, England. It has a height of 706 m (2,316 ft) and is situated in the far eastern sector of the national park, 6½ kilometres ENE of the town of Ambleside. Yoke is the southern extremity of the long ridge that runs southwards from the fell of High Street. Yoke’s name is believed to be derived from the Old English language word geoc which is similar to the German word joch meaning mountain ridge.

Shipman Knotts mountain in United Kingdom

Shipman Knotts is a fell in the English Lake District in Cumbria, England. It reaches a height of 587 metres (1,926 ft) and is situated in one of the quieter areas of the national park, 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) north-east of Kentmere village. Although not one of the best-known Lake District fells and strictly speaking it is just the southern shoulder of Kentmere Pike it earned a separate chapter in Alfred Wainwright’s Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells due to “Its characteristic roughness…rocky outcrops are everywhere on its steep slopes”.

Red Pike (Wasdale) mountain in United Kingdom

Red Pike is a fell in the English Lake District. It is 826 m or 2,709 ft (826 m) high and lies due north of Wast Water. It is often climbed as part of the Mosedale Horseshoe, a walk which also includes Pillar.

Wether Hill (Lake District) mountain in United Kingdom

Wether Hill is a fell in the English Lake District, between Martindale and Haweswater. It lies on the main north-south ridge of the Far Eastern Fells between Loadpot Hill and High Raise. Lesser ridges also radiate out to the east and north-west.

High Raise (High Street) mountain in United Kingdom

High Raise is a fell in the English Lake District, standing to the west of Haweswater Reservoir in the Far Eastern Fells. Note that another High Raise is the highpoint of the Central Fells.

Brock Crags mountain in United Kingdom

Brock Crags is a fell in the English Lake District, standing above Hartsop in the Far Eastern Fells. It forms part of the perimeter of Martindale, lying on the long ridge from Rampsgill Head to Place Fell.

Hartsop Dodd mountain in United Kingdom

Hartsop Dodd is a fell in the English Lake District, standing to the south east of Brothers Water. It is a subsidiary top on the north ridge of Caudale Moor, but was given separate fell status by Wainwright in his Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells. That convention is followed here.

Sour Howes mountain in United Kingdom

Sour Howes is a small fell in the English Lake District. It is situated five kilometres east of Ambleside, between the Troutbeck and Kentmere valleys and is one of the two separate fells on Applethwaite Common.

Froswick mountain in United Kingdom

Froswick is a fell in the English Lake District, standing on the fine narrow ridge between the valleys of Kentmere and Troutbeck.

Ill Bell mountain in United Kingdom

Ill Bell is a fell in the English Lake District, in the county of Cumbria, standing on the narrow ridge between the valleys of Kentmere and Troutbeck.

Kentmere Pike mountain in United Kingdom

Kentmere Pike is a fell in the English Lake District, rising between the valleys of Kentmere and Longsleddale. It is the highpoint on the ridge between Harter Fell and Shipman Knotts.

Sallows mountain in United Kingdom

Sallows is a fell in the English Lake District, rising between the valleys of Kentmere and Troutbeck. It is the highest point in the upland area to the south of Garburn Pass, variously termed Kentmere Park and Applethwaite Common on Ordnance Survey maps.

Birkhouse Moor mountain in United Kingdom

Birkhouse Moor is a fell in the English Lake District, an outlier of the Helvellyn range in the Eastern Fells. It is properly an eastern ridge of Helvellyn, but was treated as a separate fell by Alfred Wainwright in his Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells. That convention is followed here.

Far Eastern Fells

The Far Eastern Fells are a group of hills in the English Lake District. Reaching their highest point at High Street they occupy a broad area to the east of Ullswater and Kirkstone Pass. Much quieter than the central areas of Lakeland they offer in general easier but less exciting walking as the fells merge mainly into the surrounding moorlands. Exceptions however are the fine rock scenery to be seen on Harter Fell, Mardale Ill Bell and High Street surrounding the head of Haweswater

References