Threading (epilation)

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Eyebrow threading Eyebrow threading.jpg
Eyebrow threading

Threading is a method of hair removal originating in India and Central Asia. [1] In more recent times it has gained popularity in Western countries, especially with a cosmetic application (particularly for removing/shaping eyebrows).

Contents

Technique

In threading, a thin cotton or polyester thread is doubled, then twisted. It is then rolled over areas of unwanted hair, plucking the hair at the follicle level. Unlike tweezing, where single hairs are pulled out one at a time, threading can remove short rows of hair.

Advantages cited for eyebrow threading, as opposed to eyebrow waxing, include that it provides more precise control in shaping eyebrows, and that it is gentler on the skin. A disadvantage is that it can be painful, as several hairs are removed at once; however, this can be minimized if it is done correctly, i.e. with the right pressure. [2]

There are a few different techniques for threading. These include the hand method, mouth method and neck method. Each technique has advantages and disadvantages; however, the mouth holding method is the fastest and most precise. [3]

Threading allows for a more defined and precise shape and can create better definition for eyebrows. It is also used as a method of removing unwanted hair on the entire face and upper lip area. Threading is not a good method for removing hair on arms or legs, as the hair in those regions is typically quite coarse and there is too much to remove.

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References

  1. Walia, Nona (2012). "Times of India Publications". lite.epaper.timesofindia.com. Retrieved 9 July 2012. Threading, say experts, has its origins in India and Central Asia
  2. Cartner-Morley, Jess (25 September 2004). "Jess Cartner-Morley on fashion". Does it work? Vaishaly Patel's eyebrow threading. The Guardian. Retrieved December 10, 2011.
  3. "The Complete Guide to Eyebrow Threading". Brows by Val. Retrieved 2018-11-17.

Bibliography