Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge

Last updated
Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge
MCRThreeCheers.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedJune 8, 2004 (2004-06-08)
RecordedOctober 2003 – February 2004
Studio
  • Bay 7 Studios, Valley Village
  • Sparky Dark Studio, Calabasas, California
Genre
Length39:36
Label Reprise
Producer Howard Benson
My Chemical Romance chronology
I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love
(2002)
Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge
(2004)
Life on the Murder Scene
(2006)
Singles from Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge
  1. "I'm Not Okay (I Promise)"
    Released: September 13, 2004
  2. "Thank You for the Venom"
    Released: December 13, 2004 (UK)
  3. "Helena"
    Released: March 8, 2005
  4. "The Ghost of You"
    Released: August 29, 2005

Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge is the second studio album by American rock band My Chemical Romance, released on June 8, 2004 by Reprise Records. [1] [2] With this album, the band produced a cleaner sound than that of their 2002 debut I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love . [3] It was the band's final release to feature drummer Matt Pelissier, who would later be replaced by Bob Bryar. [4]

Contents

The album was a success for both the band and the label, [5] The record produced several radio singles and popular MTV videos, including "I'm Not Okay (I Promise)," "Helena," and "The Ghost of You." The four singles from the album included "I'm Not Okay (I Promise)", "Helena", "The Ghost of You", and in the United Kingdom, "Thank You for the Venom". [3] It was certified platinum less than a year after its release, [2] and has sold over three million copies in the United States. [5]

Music and lyrical themes

Musically, "Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge" has been described as alternative rock, [6] emo, [3] [7] [8] pop punk, [9] [3] [7] post-hardcore, [10] and punk rock. [11] [12] While I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love was considered "a particularly strident entry in that shifty genre of bands tortuously slamming together elements of emo, hardcore, and even metal", [13] Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge "both showcased their songwriting skills and gave them much-deserved attention". [3] Moving away from the "screamo parts" [14] and "the more complicated structures" [15] of their first record in favor of a sound that "skirts the line between pop punk and edgy, theatrical, emo" [3] while being "strongly influenced by hardcore punk", [15] Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge has been variously compared to The Misfits, [16] AFI, [13] and Thursday. [13]

Lead singer Gerard Way has referred to the first single "I'm Not Okay (I Promise)" as a "self help pop song" [17] while also being called "a surging piece of emo-pop with a hook as ridiculously catchy as it was ridiculous" [18] and a "moving anthem for the young and depressed" [19] by AllMusic and Rolling Stone respectively. This single went on to be nominated for the Kerrang! award for best single [20] and reached number 86 on the US Billboard Hot 100. [21]

The album opener "Helena" has been referred to as an "album highlight and smash hit". Gerard has claimed that the song "shaped what the album is about" and "revealed their darkside" in comparison to the first single. [17] Its lyrics mourn the loss of Gerard and Mikey's grandmother, [17] Elena Lee Rush, and was their first entry into the top 40. [21]

Album concept

According to Way, the album can be understood as a "pseudo-conceptual horror story", [3] that details:

...the story of a man and a woman who are separated by death in a gunfight and he goes to hell only to realize by the devil telling him that she's still alive. The devil says he can be with her again if he brings the devil the souls of a thousand evil men and the man agrees to do it, and so the devil hands him a gun. That was the idea behind the concept, the record ended up being much more about loss and real life than anything, so I would say it's a good split. [22]

Reception

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [23]
Alternative Press Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [3]
Blender Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [24]
IGN 7.1/10 [25]
Kludge 7/10 [26]
Melodic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [27]
Pitchfork 8.2/10 [28]
Rolling Stone Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [29]
The Rolling Stone Album Guide Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svgStar empty.svg [30]
Stylus Magazine B [31]

Johnny Loftus of AllMusic wrote that "with the aid of production major-leaguer Howard Benson, they've edited the slight rookie excesses of I Brought You My Bullets You Brought Me Your Love, resulting in a rewarding, pretty damn relentless product." [23] Andy Greenwald of Blender noted Way's integration of elements of his life into the songs on the album and remarked that his "gulping, gasping whine turns stompers like 'I’m Not Okay (I Promise)' into after-school poetry". [24] Ian Mathers of Stylus Magazine felt that the album contained "twelve near-flawless songs and an interlude in thirty-nine minutes" and that "even when it lets up, [it] doesn’t let up", [31] while Kirk Miller of Rolling Stone described it as "a hell of a good time." [29] IGN critic JR was more reserved in his praise, calling Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge "a good album" that nonetheless "isn't nearly as varied or daring as it could have been". [25] In The Village Voice , Robert Christgau gave it a "dud" rating. [32]

Accolades

PublicationCountryAccoladeYearRank
Rock Sound UKTop 50 Albums of the Year20045 [33]
Spin USThe 40 Best Albums of 200434 [34]
Kerrang! UKAlbums of the Year3 [35]
Metal Hammer UKAlbums of 20047 [36]

Legacy

NME listed the album as one of "20 Emo Albums That Have Resolutely Stood the Test of Time". [37] The album was ranked at number 260 on Spin 's "The 300 Best Albums of the Past 30 Years (1985–2014)" list. [38] Rock Sound wrote that the album is "an era-defining release", striking "a nerve both musically and emotionally with millions around the world." [39]

In 2016, Rolling Stone declared Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge the tenth greatest emo album out of 40, saying that "Three Cheers wasn't just a concept record, it was a concept sequel, expanding the small-screen story of 2002's I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love into a big-budget production, complete with ruminations on life and death ("Helena") biting kiss-offs ("I'm Not Okay") and a series of dramatic music videos that made them MTV darlings." [8]

In May 2020, The Forty-Five declared "I'm Not Okay (I Promise)" the greatest emo track of all time.

Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge has sold over one million copies to date in the United States and has been certified platinum by the RIAA. [40] By February 2006, the album had sold over 1,356,000 copies in the US. [41] It has also been certified Double Platinum in Canada, Platinum in the UK and Gold in Ireland, Chile [42] and Argentina.

Track listing

All tracks are written by My Chemical Romance.

No.TitleLength
1."Helena"3:22
2."Give 'Em Hell, Kid"2:18
3."To the End"3:01
4."You Know What They Do to Guys Like Us in Prison"2:53
5."I'm Not Okay (I Promise)"3:08
6."The Ghost of You"3:22
7."The Jetset Life Is Gonna Kill You"3:37
8."Interlude"0:57
9."Thank You for the Venom"3:41
10."Hang 'Em High"2:47
11."It's Not a Fashion Statement, It's a Deathwish" (listed as "It's Not a Fashion Statement, It's a Fucking Deathwish" in the album liner notes)3:30
12."Cemetery Drive"3:08
13."I Never Told You What I Do for a Living"3:51
Total length:39:36

Additional tracks

Japanese edition
No.TitleLength
14."Bury Me in Black" (Demo)2:37
Japanese special edition DVD – live from Summer Sonic 2004 in Tokyo on August 8, 2004
No.TitleLength
1."I'm Not Okay (I Promise)" (music video version 2) 
2."I'm Not Okay (I Promise)" (music video version 1) 
3."Thank You for the Venom" (live) 
4."Helena" (live) 
5."Give 'Em Hell, Kid" (live) 
6."The Ghost of You" (live) 
7."You Know What They Do to Guys Like Us in Prison" (live) 
8."I'm Not Okay (I Promise)" (live) 

Personnel

Production

Charts

Album

Chart (2004)Peak
position
Australian Albums (ARIA) [43] 38
Austrian Albums (Ö3 Austria) [44] 73
German Albums (Offizielle Top 100) [45] 57
Irish Albums (IRMA) [46] 36
Japanese Albums (Oricon)73
New Zealand Albums (RMNZ) [47] 30
Scottish Albums (OCC) [48] 46
UK Albums (OCC) [49] 34
US Billboard 200 [50] 28

Singles

YearSongPeak chart positions
US
[21]
US Mod
[51]
US Main
[52]
UK
[53]
NZ
[54]
AUS
[55]
2004"I'm Not Okay (I Promise)"864193865
"Thank You for the Venom"71
2005"Helena"3311202778
"The Ghost of You"8493827

Certifications

RegionCertification Certified units/sales
Argentina (CAPIF) [56] Gold30,000^
Australia (ARIA) [57] Gold35,000^
Canada (Music Canada) [58] Platinum100,000^
Chile [42] Gold7,500
Ireland (IRMA) [59] Gold7,500^
Mexico (AMPROFON) [60] Gold50,000^
New Zealand (RMNZ) [61] Gold7,500^
United Kingdom (BPI) [62] Platinum300,000^
United States (RIAA) [63] 3× Platinum3,000,000^

*sales figures based on certification alone
^shipments figures based on certification alone

Release history

RegionDateLabelFormatCatalogue
AustraliaApril 11, 2005 Reprise CD 9362486152
JapanJuly 22, 2004WPCR11890
January 26, 2005CD+DVD WPZR30075
June 24, 2009CDWPCR13504
United KingdomSeptember 3, 20049362486152
United StatesJune 8, 2004486152
December 16, 2008 Vinyl LP 148615

Related Research Articles

Emo is a rock music genre characterized by an emphasis on emotional expression, sometimes through confessional lyrics. It emerged as a style of post-hardcore from the mid-1980s hardcore punk movement in Washington, D.C., where it was known as emotional hardcore or emocore and pioneered by bands such as Rites of Spring and Embrace. In the early–mid 1990s, emo was adopted and reinvented by alternative rock, indie rock and pop punk bands such as Sunny Day Real Estate, Jawbreaker, Weezer and Jimmy Eat World, with Weezer breaking into the mainstream during this time. By the mid-1990s, bands such as Braid, the Promise Ring and the Get Up Kids emerged from the burgeoning Midwest emo scene, and several independent record labels began to specialize in the genre. Meanwhile, screamo, a more aggressive style of emo using screamed vocals, also emerged, pioneered by the San Diego bands Heroin and Antioch Arrow. Screamo achieved mainstream success in the 2000s with bands like Hawthorne Heights, Silverstein, Story of the Year, Thursday, The Used, and Underoath.

<i>Weezer</i> (Blue Album) 1994 album by Weezer

Weezer is the eponymous debut studio album by American rock band Weezer, released on May 10, 1994 by DGC Records. The album came two years after the band's founding, after they initially struggled as an alternative to grunge music, which was prevalent in Los Angeles during the early 1990s. It was almost entirely arranged and composed by frontman Rivers Cuomo, who also anticipated to lead the band in self-producing the album. However, at the behest of DGC, the band was required to include a producer, and collectively opted for Cars frontman Ric Ocasek. Most of the recording was conducted at Electric Lady Studios in New York City between August and September 1993, a period that coincided with founding guitarist Jason Cropper being fired and replaced by Brian Bell.

My Chemical Romance American rock band formed in 2001

My Chemical Romance is an American rock band from Newark, New Jersey. The band's current lineup consists of lead vocalist Gerard Way, guitarists Ray Toro and Frank Iero, and bassist Mikey Way. Founded by Gerard, Mikey, Toro, and Matt Pelissier, the band signed to Eyeball Records and released their debut album, I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love, in 2002. They signed with Reprise Records the next year and released their major-label debut, Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge, in 2004. Shortly after the album's release, Pelissier was replaced by Bob Bryar. A commercial success, the album was awarded platinum status over a year later.

<i>Bleed American</i> 2001 studio album by Jimmy Eat World

Bleed American is the fourth studio album by American rock band Jimmy Eat World, released on July 24, 2001, by DreamWorks Records. Originally released as Bleed American, it was re-released as Jimmy Eat World following the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., which took place seven weeks after its initial release.

<i>I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love</i> 2002 studio album by My Chemical Romance

I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love is the debut studio album by American rock band My Chemical Romance, released on July 23, 2002 by Eyeball Records. Produced by Thursday vocalist Geoff Rickly, it was recorded at Nada Recording Studio in New Windsor, New York, in May 2002.

Mikey Way American musician

Michael James Way is an American musician and actor. He is best known as the bassist of the rock band My Chemical Romance. He is also the multi-instrumentalist and backing vocalist of rock duo Electric Century. Mikey co-wrote Collapser with Shaun Simon due to begin release July 2019 on DC Comics.

Helena (My Chemical Romance song) 2005 single by My Chemical Romance

"Helena" is a song by American rock band My Chemical Romance, and is the third single from their second studio album, Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge. The song is featured on the soundtrack for the 2005 remake, entitled House of Wax and played during the full credits.

Im Not Okay (I Promise) 2004 single by My Chemical Romance

"I'm Not Okay " is the lead single and fifth track from My Chemical Romance's second studio album, Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge. "I'm Not Okay " was released to radio on September 28, 2004. The song is also featured on the soundtrack of Burnout 3: Takedown.

The Ghost of You 2005 single by My Chemical Romance

"The Ghost of You" is the fourth and final single and sixth track from My Chemical Romance's second studio album, Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge. "The Ghost of You" was released to radio on September 27, 2005. The song deals with the fear of loss. The song's title is an allusion to an ad from Watchmen, reading "Oh, how the ghost of you clings". The ad itself was an allusion to the song, "These Foolish Things". The song's lyrics deal with losing a loved one.

Headfirst for Halos 2004 single by My Chemical Romance

"Headfirst for Halos" is the sixth track and third single from My Chemical Romance's debut album, I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love. It is also their third overall single. The cover of the single was seen in the "old school" music video for the song "I'm Not Okay ", featured on the album Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge. The song peaked at number 80 in the UK. The single has been released on CD format as well as a limited press on 7" vinyl.

<i>Life on the Murder Scene</i> 2006 live album by My Chemical Romance

Life on the Murder Scene is a live album by American rock band My Chemical Romance. It was released on March 21, 2006. The release includes three discs of the whole history documenting the band from the start to the present. Life on the Murder Scene is a predominantly live album, but also includes two demo tracks and a previously unreleased track. Models Jamisin Matthews and Jaime Andrews portray the demolition couple in the cover photo, booklet, packaging, DVD art, and DVD menus. The demo of "Bury Me in Black" was previously released as a bonus track on the Japanese release of Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge.

<i>MTV Unplugged 2.0</i> 2002 live album by Dashboard Confessional

MTV Unplugged 2.0 is a live album released by American emo band Dashboard Confessional on 17 December 2002 through Vagrant. This CD/DVD package is the band's first live album. The band is also the first non-Platinum selling artist to be on MTV Unplugged. "Screaming Infidelities" was released as a single.

<i>The Black Parade</i> 2006 studio album by My Chemical Romance

The Black Parade is the third studio album by American rock band My Chemical Romance. Released on October 24, 2006, through Reprise Records, it was produced by Rob Cavallo, known for having produced multiple albums for Goo Goo Dolls and Green Day. It is a rock opera centering on a dying character with cancer known as "The Patient". The album tells the story of his apparent death, experiences in the afterlife, and subsequent reflections on his life. It is the band's only studio album to feature drummer Bob Bryar before his departure in 2010.

Welcome to the Black Parade 2006 single by My Chemical Romance

"Welcome to the Black Parade" is a song from My Chemical Romance's third studio album, The Black Parade. It was released on September 12, 2006 as the album's lead single, with the studio version available on the band's Myspace on September 2, 2006. The music video for the single was recognized as MTV's "Greatest Music Video of the Century" in 2017. The cover art of the single is the only artwork where the band appears, with the exception of the cover art for "The Ghost of You", where they are shown as silhouettes. The song topped the UK Singles Chart, and reached number nine on the US Billboard Hot 100.

My Chemical Romance discography Band discography

The official discography of My Chemical Romance, an American rock band, consists of four studio albums, two live albums, three compilation albums, six extended plays, 25 singles, four video albums, 18 music videos, and 13 original appearances on other albums.

Teenagers (song) 2007 single by My Chemical Romance

"Teenagers" is the fourth and final single and the eleventh track from My Chemical Romance's third studio album, The Black Parade (2006). It was the third United States single from the album, but the fourth released in the United Kingdom, the Philippines, Australia and Canada. The song was released to radio on May 15, 2007.

Emo pop is a fusion genre combining together emo and pop punk. Emo pop features a music style with more concise songs and hook-filled choruses. Emo pop began in the 1990s with bands like Jimmy Eat World, the Get Up Kids, Weezer and the Promise Ring. The genre became mainstream in the early 2000s with Jimmy Eat World's album Bleed American, including the album's song "The Middle". In the 2000s, other emo pop bands that were mainstream included Fall Out Boy, the All-American Rejects, My Chemical Romance, Panic! at the Disco and Paramore. The popularity of emo pop declined in the 2010s, with some prominent artists in the genre either disbanding or abandoning the emo pop style.

<i>Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys</i> 2010 studio album by My Chemical Romance

Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys is the fourth studio album by American rock band My Chemical Romance released on November 22, 2010, by Reprise Records, its songs are associated with the band's well known sound of alternative rock, pop punk, and punk rock as well as new elements, including power pop, pop rock, and electronic rock. The inspiration for the album came from contemporary rock, psychedelic rock, and protopunk bands of the sixties and seventies. It was the final album released before their six-year breakup from 2013 to 2019.

Bob Bryar American musician

Robert Cory "Bob" Bryar is an American musician and sound engineer best known as the drummer of the rock band My Chemical Romance. The longest tenured and last official drummer, he performed in the band from 2004 until his departure in 2010.

My Chemical Romance Reunion Tour Concert tour by My Chemical Romance

The Reunion Tour is an ongoing concert tour by American rock band My Chemical Romance.

References

  1. Miller, Kirk. "Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge". Rolling Stone . Retrieved 7 April 2015.
  2. 1 2 "My Chemical Romance". Contactmusic.com . Retrieved 7 April 2015. My Chemical Romance signed with Reprise in 2003. After a major tour with Avenged Sevenfold, the band started to work on their second album. The album went platinum in less than a year.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Zemler, Emily (June 22, 2010). "My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge". Alternative Press . Archived from the original on March 23, 2014. Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  4. Joel Hoard. "My Chemical Romance Biography". Rolling Stone . Retrieved 12 April 2015. On the strength of tracks like the pummeling 9–11 lament "Skylines and Turnstiles," the band quickly signed with Reprise Records. 2004's Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge (Number 28) went platinum and featured singles "I'm Not Okay (I Promise)" (Number 86, 2004) and "Helena" (Number 33, 2005). Pelissier left the band shortly after the release of Three Cheers and was replaced by Bob Bryar, a sound tech for the Used.
  5. 1 2 Martens, Todd (14 October 2006). "Up from the Underground: Expensive Spectacle and Innovative Viral Marketing Help My Chemical Romance Graduate from Internet Buzz to Platinum Stardom". Billboard (Vol. 118, No. 41). p. 26.
  6. "My Chemical Romance interview and talk 'Danger Days'". Guitar World. Retrieved April 26, 2015.
  7. 1 2 "NME Reviews - Album Review: My Chemical Romance - Danger Days: The True Lives Of The Fabulous Killjoys (Warner) - NME.COM". NME. 19 November 2010. Retrieved April 24, 2015.
  8. 1 2 Bayer, Jonah (2019-09-04). "40 Greatest Emo Albums of All Time – Rolling Stone". Rollingstone.com. Retrieved 2019-09-11.
  9. "My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge (album review 8) – Sputnikmusic". Sputnikmusic. Retrieved April 24, 2015.
  10. "The Umbrella Academy #1 review". Den of Geek. Retrieved April 26, 2015.
  11. Briganti, Skyler (August 26, 2004). "'Three Cheers' for Romance". The Free Lance–Star . p. 26.
  12. Bryant, Tom. "The Top 10 Best My Chemical Romance Songs". TeamRock.
  13. 1 2 3 Johnny Loftus. "Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge – My Chemical Romance – Songs, Reviews, Credits, Awards – AllMusic". AllMusic. Retrieved April 26, 2015.
  14. "Melodic Net - My Chemical Romance - Three Cheers for sweet revenge". www.melodic.net.
  15. 1 2 "My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge – Review – Stylus Magazine". Stylus Magazine. Retrieved 26 April 2015.
  16. Kirk Miller (2004-07-08). "Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge – Rolling Stone". Rollingstone.com. Retrieved 2019-09-11.
  17. 1 2 3
  18. Erlewine, Stephen Thomas. "The Black Parade – My Chemical Romance". AllMusic . Archived from the original on September 3, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2008.
  19. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-10-25. Retrieved 2011-12-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  20. 1 2 3 "My Chemical Romance Chart History: Hot 100". Billboard. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  21. "THREE CHEERS FOR SWEET REVENGE". Drinking Souls. Archived from the original on February 18, 2015.
  22. 1 2 Loftus, Johnny. "Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge – My Chemical Romance". AllMusic . Retrieved August 13, 2008.
  23. 1 2 Greenwald, Andy. "My Chemical Romance: Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge". Blender . Archived from the original on December 31, 2007. Retrieved August 13, 2008.
  24. 1 2 JR (September 20, 2005). "My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge". IGN . Archived from the original on February 13, 2011. Retrieved August 13, 2008.
  25. McClelland, Mike. "My Chemical Romance: Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge". Kludge . Archived from the original on November 7, 2006. Retrieved December 9, 2009.
  26. Roth, Kaj. "My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge". Melodic . Retrieved December 11, 2011.
  27. Gordon, Arielle (December 8, 2019). "My Chemical Romance: Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge". Pitchfork . Retrieved December 8, 2019.
  28. 1 2 Miller, Kirk (July 8, 2004). "Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge". Rolling Stone . Retrieved August 13, 2008.
  29. Maerz, Melissa (April 14, 2010). "My Chemical Romance: Album Guide". Rolling Stone . Archived from the original on November 23, 2010. Retrieved May 12, 2017.
  30. 1 2 Mathers, Ian (August 19, 2004). "My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge – Review". Stylus Magazine . Archived from the original on March 31, 2014. Retrieved August 13, 2008.
  31. Christgau, Robert (February 14, 2006). "Consumer Guide: Forever Young". The Village Voice . Retrieved August 13, 2008.
  32. "Top 75 Albums of the Year". Rock Sound.
  33. "The 40 Best Albums of 2004". Spin. Retrieved December 31, 2004.
  34. "Kerrang! Albums Of The Year". Kerrang!.
  35. "Metal Hammer Albums Of 2004". Metal Hammer.
  36. "20 Emo Albums That Have Resolutely Stood The Test Of Time". NME.com. January 14, 2015. Retrieved July 29, 2015.
  37. Zaleski, Annie (May 11, 2015). "The 300 Best Albums of the Past 30 Years (1985–2014)". Spin. Retrieved August 6, 2015.
  38. Bird, ed. 2015, p. 34
  39. "RIAA certifications for My Chemical Romance". Archived from the original on September 24, 2015.
  40. Kohli, Rohan (February 15, 2006). "Soundscan Results: Week Ending 2/12/06". absolutepunk.net. Retrieved February 12, 2016.
  41. 1 2 Maira, Manuel (2007). "My Chemical Romance pone a Chile en su agenda". La Tercera . Santiago de Chile. De las dos mil copias vendidas de su álbum debut, [I Brought You My Bullets, You Brought Me Your Love] (2002) pasaron al status de oro −7.500 discos- con sus dos siguientes entregas: Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge (2004)...
  42. "Australiancharts.com – My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge". Hung Medien. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  43. "Austriancharts.at – My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge" (in German). Hung Medien. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  44. "Offiziellecharts.de – My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  45. "Irish-charts.com – Discography My Chemical Romance". Hung Medien. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  46. "Charts.nz – My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers for Sweet Revenge". Hung Medien. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  47. "Official Scottish Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  48. "Official Albums Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  49. "My Chemical Romance Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved August 19, 2018.
  50. "My Chemical Romance Chart History: Alternative Songs". Billboard. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  51. "My Chemical Romance Chart History: Mainstream Rock". Billboard. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  52. "My Chemical Romance | full Official Chart history". Official Charts Company. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  53. "Discography My Chemical Romance". charts.nz. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  54. "Discography My Chemical Romance". australian-charts.com. Retrieved 2018-08-19.
  55. "Discos de oro y platino" (in Spanish). Cámara Argentina de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas. Archived from the original on 6 July 2011. Retrieved 15 August 2012.
  56. "ARIA Charts – Accreditations – 2006 Albums". Australian Recording Industry Association. Archived from the original on 10 August 2020.
  57. "Canadian album certifications – My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge". Music Canada . Retrieved 25 July 2012.
  58. "Irish album certifications – My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge". Irish Recorded Music Association.
  59. "Certificaciones" (in Spanish). Asociación Mexicana de Productores de Fonogramas y Videogramas . Retrieved 25 July 2012.Type My Chemical Romance in the box under the ARTISTA column heading and Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge in the box under TÍTULO
  60. "Latest Gold / Platinum Albums". Radioscope. 17 July 2011. Archived from the original on 2011-07-24.
  61. "British album certifications – My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge". British Phonographic Industry . Retrieved July 25, 2012.Select albums in the Format field. Select Platinum in the Certification field. Type Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge in the "Search BPI Awards" field and then press Enter.
  62. "American album certifications – My Chemical Romance – Three Cheers For Sweet Revenge". Recording Industry Association of America . Retrieved 30 December 2017.If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH. 

Sources

  • Bird, Ryan, ed. (June 2015). "The 200 Moments that Defined Our Lifetime". Rock Sound. London: Freeway Press Inc. (200). ISSN   1465-0185.