Three Otters

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Three Otters
Three Otters.jpg
Three Otters, September 2012
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LocationW of jct. of Rte. 838 and VA 43, near Bedford, Virginia
Coordinates 37°21′22″N79°32′46″W / 37.35611°N 79.54611°W / 37.35611; -79.54611 Coordinates: 37°21′22″N79°32′46″W / 37.35611°N 79.54611°W / 37.35611; -79.54611
Area90 acres (36 ha)
Built1827 (1827)
Architectural styleGreek Revival
NRHP reference No. 70000785 [1]
VLR No.009-0031
Significant dates
Added to NRHPSeptember 15, 1970
Designated VLRJuly 7, 1970 [2]

Three Otters is a historic home located near Bedford, Bedford County, Virginia. Built about 1827 by local artisans following the pattern book of Asher Benjamin for a local merchant, the large, two-story, brick dwelling exemplifies the Greek Revival style. It measures approximately 50 feet square, and has a low pitched hipped roof. The original two-story kitchen and pantry outbuilding is connected to the main house by a covered walkway and two-story brick and frame addition. Also on the property are a contributing brick well house, chicken house, and necessary. [3]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 2013-05-12.
  3. Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission Staff (May 1970). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Three Otters" (PDF). and Accompanying photo