Tiasa

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In Greek mythology, Tiasa (Ancient Greek: Τίασα) was a Naiad nymph of a river [1] near Amyclae, Sparta. She was a Laconian princess as the daughter of King Eurotas and Cleta, and thus sister of Sparta.

By the river Tiasa was situated a temple of Cleta and Phaenna, the two Charites recognized in Sparta, which was purported to have been founded by Lacedaemon. [2]

Notes

  1. Cf. also Hesychius of Alexandria s. v. Τίασσα: "Tiassa: a spring in Lacedaemon; according to some a river". A "fountain of Tiassus" is also mentioned in Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae 4.139B
  2. Pausanias, 3.18.6

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