Tift County Courthouse

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Tift County Courthouse
Tift County Courthouse, Tifton, GA, US.jpg
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Location Tifton, Georgia
Coordinates 31°27′15″N83°30′29″W / 31.45417°N 83.50806°W / 31.45417; -83.50806 Coordinates: 31°27′15″N83°30′29″W / 31.45417°N 83.50806°W / 31.45417; -83.50806
Built 1912
Architect Edwards, W.A.; Jenkins, J.F.,& Co.
Architectural style Beaux Arts
MPS Georgia County Courthouses TR
NRHP reference #

80001245

[1]
Added to NRHP September 18, 1980
Tift County Courthouse in 1971, by Calvin Beale Tift County Georgia Couthouse.jpg
Tift County Courthouse in 1971, by Calvin Beale

The Tift County Courthouse, built in 1912-1913, [2] is a historic courthouse building located in Tifton, Georgia. It was designed by Atlanta-based architect William Augustus Edwards who designed one other courthouse in Georgia, two in Florida and nine in South Carolina as well as academic buildings at 12 institutions in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina. [3] On September 18, 1980, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places.

Courthouse building which is home to a court

A courthouse is a building that is home to a local court of law and often the regional county government as well, although this is not the case in some larger cities. The term is common in North America. In most other English-speaking countries, buildings which house courts of law are simply called "courts" or "court buildings". In most of Continental Europe and former non-English-speaking European colonies, the equivalent term is a palace of justice.

Tifton, Georgia City in Georgia, United States

Tifton is a city in Tift County, Georgia, United States. The population was 16,869 at the 2010 census. The city is the county seat of Tift County.

Georgia (U.S. state) State of the United States of America

Georgia is a state in the Southeastern United States. It began as a British colony in 1733, the last and southernmost of the original Thirteen Colonies to be established. Named after King George II of Great Britain, the Province of Georgia covered the area from South Carolina south to Spanish Florida and west to French Louisiana at the Mississippi River. Georgia was the fourth state to ratify the United States Constitution, on January 2, 1788. In 1802–1804, western Georgia was split to the Mississippi Territory, which later split to form Alabama with part of former West Florida in 1819. Georgia declared its secession from the Union on January 19, 1861, and was one of the original seven Confederate states. It was the last state to be restored to the Union, on July 15, 1870. Georgia is the 24th largest and the 8th most populous of the 50 United States. From 2007 to 2008, 14 of Georgia's counties ranked among the nation's 100 fastest-growing, second only to Texas. Georgia is known as the Peach State and the Empire State of the South. Atlanta, the state's capital and most populous city, has been named a global city. Atlanta's metropolitan area contains about 55% of the population of the entire state.

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See also

This is a list of properties and districts in Tift County, Georgia that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP).

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