Tigiria State

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Tigiria State
Princely State of British India
16th century–1948
DhenkanalKart.jpg
Tigiria State in the Imperial Gazetteer of India
Area 
 1931
119 km2 (46 sq mi)
Population 
 1931
24,822
History 
 Established
16th century
1948
Succeeded by
India Flag of India.svg
Today part of Odisha, Flag of India.svg  India

Tigiria State, was one of the princely states of India during the period of the British Raj. It was located in present-day Tigiria block of Cuttack district, Odisha. Although it was the smallest of the states of the Orissa States Agency it was the most densely populated. [1] The last ruler of Tigiria joined the state to the Indian Union in 1948. [2]

Contents

The state was bound in the north by Dhenkanal State, in the east it was bound by Athgarh State, in the south by the Mahanadi River and in the west by Baramba State. [1]

History

The name 'Tigiria' likely originated in the Sanskrit Trigiri, meaning "Three Hills". Most of the inhabitants of Tigiria were Hindu, members of the Chasa caste, and important places of worship were located within the area of Tigiria State.

Tigiria was founded at an uncertain date in the sixteenth century by a ruler named Nityananda Tunga of the local Kshatriya Tunga clan of Central Odisha region. According to legends he was directed to the spot in a dream while on a pilgrimage to Puri. [3] [4] [1] In 1682, the Marathas granted the title of Mahapatra to Raja Sankarsen Tunga for his services. His successor Gopinath Chamupati Singh has authored the war treatise Virasarvasvam. [5]

The last Raja Brajraj Kshatriya Birbar Chamupati Singh Mahapatra signed the accession to the Indian Union on 1 January 1948 [2] and was the final surviving royal of the British Raj-era princely states until he breathed his last in 2015. [6] [7]

Rulers

The rulers of Tigiria state of the Tunga dynasty. [8]

Titular

See also

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Brajraj Kshatriya Birbar Chamupati Singh Mahapatra was the final surviving royal of the British Raj-era "princely states" Tigiria State of Orissa.

Banki State

Banki or Bānki State was a princely state in Odisha during the British Raj. Its capital was Banki, in the western part of present day Cuttack district.

The Bhoi dynasty were a medieval Hindu dynasty from the Indian subcontinent, which originated in the region of historical Odra that reigned from 1541 to 1560 CE. The Bhois are Gopalas and are associated with Yaduvansh, of which Sri Krishna of the Mahabharata fame. This dynasty was founded by Govinda Vidyadhara, who had usurped the throne from the weaker Gajapati dynasty rulers as the kingdom started weakening but had a short-lived reign as ruling chiefs of Odisha as the ensuing internal rivalries and constant threats of invasions rendered them weak and were eventually overthrown by Mukunda Deva of Chalukya dynasty in 1560 CE.

References

  1. 1 2 3 Imperial Gazetteer of India, v. 23, p. 357.
  2. 1 2 Tigiria Princely State – "The Golden Book of India"; LETHBRIDGE, Roper, MacMillan & Co., 1893 p. 539
  3. ODISHA DISTRICT GAZETTEERS CUTTACK (PDF), GAD, Govt of Odisha, 1993, p. 46-70
  4. Cobden Ramsay (1910), Bengal Gazetteers Feudatory States Of Orissa, DLI, p. 335
  5. Manugayatri Rath (December 2013). "Virasarvasvam : A War Treatise of Gopinath Chamupati Singh" (PDF). Odisha History Congress. p. 192. Retrieved 2 March 2021.
  6. "A prince dies a pauper". Times of India. 6 December 2015. Retrieved 18 December 2015.
  7. Mohanty, Debabrata (1 December 2015). "Erstwhile king of Tigiria Brajraj Mahapatra dies in Odisha". The Indian Express .
  8. Princely States of India K-W

Coordinates: 20°29′N85°31′E / 20.483°N 85.517°E / 20.483; 85.517