Timeline of the 2011 Pacific hurricane season

Last updated

Timeline of the
2012 Pacific hurricane season
2012 Pacific hurricane season summary map.png
Season summary map
Season boundaries
First system formedJune 7, 2011
Last system dissipatedNovember 25, 2011
Strongest system
Name Dora
Maximum winds155 mph (250 km/h)
(1-minute sustained)
Lowest pressure929 mbar (hPa; 27.43 inHg)
Longest lasting system
NameIrwin
Duration10.75 days
Storm articles
Other years
2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

The 2011 Pacific hurricane season officially started on May 15, 2011 in the eastern Pacific, designated as the area east of 140°W, and on June 1, 2011 in the central Pacific, which is between the International Date Line and 140°W, and lasted until November 30, 2011. These dates typically limit the period of each year when most tropical cyclones form in the eastern Pacific basin. This timeline documents all the storm formations, strengthening, weakening, landfalls, extratropical transitions, as well as dissipation.

Contents

The first storm of the season, Hurricane Adrian formed off the southwest coast of Mexico. Thirteen tropical cyclones developed during the season. Most of these attained tropical storm status, and seven attained hurricane status. However this streak ended when Tropical Storm Fernanda formed and dissipated, never having reached hurricane strength.

Timeline of events

Tropical Depression Twelve-E (2011)Hurricane Jova (2011)Hurricane Hilary (2011)Hurricane Dora (2011)Hurricane Beatriz (2011)Hurricane Adrian (2011)Saffir–Simpson scaleTimeline of the 2011 Pacific hurricane season

May

May 15

June

June 1

June 7

June 8

June 9

Hurricane Adrian near peak intensity on June 9, 2011 Adrian 9 June 2011 1800Z.jpg
Hurricane Adrian near peak intensity on June 9, 2011

June 10

June 11

June 12

June 19

June 20

June 21

June 22

July

Track map of Hurricane Calvin Calvin 2011 track.png
Track map of Hurricane Calvin

July 7

July 8

July 9

July 10

July 17

Hurricane Dora at peak intensity. Hurricane Dora July 21.jpg
Hurricane Dora at peak intensity.

July 20

July 21

July 22

July 23

July 24

Hurricane Eugene at peak intensity. Hurricane Eugene Aug 3 2011 2110Z.jpg
Hurricane Eugene at peak intensity.

July 31

August

August 1

August 2

August 3

August 4

Tropical Storm Fernanda over the open Pacific. Tropical Storm Fernanda Aug 17 2011 1955Z.jpg
Tropical Storm Fernanda over the open Pacific.

August 5

August 6

August 15

August 16

August 17

August 18

Track map of Hurricane Greg Greg 2011 track.png
Track map of Hurricane Greg

August 19

August 20

August 21

August 31

Tropical Depression Eight moving onshore. 8-E Aug 31 2011 1955Z.jpg
Tropical Depression Eight moving onshore.

September

September 1

September 21

September 22

September 23

September 25

Hurricane Hilary at peak intensity. Hurricane Hilary Sept 23 2011 2000Z.jpg
Hurricane Hilary at peak intensity.

September 26

September 27

September 28

September 29

September 30

October

October 6

October 7

October 8

Hurricane Jova near peak intensity. Hurricane Jova Oct 10 2011 2045Z.jpg
Hurricane Jova near peak intensity.

October 10

October 12

Track map of Hurricane Irwin. Irwin 2011 track.png
Track map of Hurricane Irwin.

October 13

October 15

October 16

November

Hurricane Kenneth on November 21. Kenneth Nov 21 2011 1815Z.jpg
Hurricane Kenneth on November 21.

November 18

November 20

November 21

November 22

November 23

November 25

November 30

See also

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