Tongwe language

Last updated
Tongwe
Bende
Native to Tanzania
Native speakers
40,000 (1999–2001) [1]
Dialects
  • Tongwe
  • Bende
Language codes
ISO 639-3 Either:
tny   Tongwe
bdp   Bende
Glottolog tong1320  Tongwe
bend1258  Bende
F.10 (F.11–12) [2]
ELP Bende

Tongwe (Sitongwe) and Bende (Sibende) constitute a clade of Bantu languages coded Zone F.10 in Guthrie's classification. According to Nurse & Philippson (2003), they form a valid node. Indeed, at 90% lexical similarity they may be dialects of a single language.

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References

  1. Tongwe at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
    Bende at Ethnologue (18th ed., 2015)
  2. Jouni Filip Maho, 2009. New Updated Guthrie List Online