USS Meredith (DD-726)

Last updated
USS Meredith (DD-726) underway at sea on 16 April 1944 (NH 89423).jpg
History
US flag 48 stars.svgUnited States
Namesake: Jonathan Meredith
Ordered: 1942
Builder: Bath Iron Works
Laid down: 26 July 1943
Launched: 21 December 1943
Commissioned: 14 March 1944
Fate: Sunk 9 June 1944, sold and scrapped 5 August 1960
General characteristics
Class and type: Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer
Displacement: 2,200 tons
Length: 376 ft 6 in (114.8 m)
Beam: 40 ft (12.2 m)
Draft: 15 ft 8 in (4.8 m)
Propulsion:
  • 60,000 shp (45 MW)
  • 2 propellers
Speed: 34 knots (63 km/h)
Range: 6500 nm @ 15 kn (12,000 km @ 28 km/h)
Complement: 336
Armament:

USS Meredith (DD-726), an Allen M. Sumner-class destroyer, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Jonathan Meredith, a Marine sergeant who saved the life of Lieutenant John Trippe of Vixen, during the Barbary Wars.

Contents

Meredith was laid down on 26 July 1943 by Bath Iron Works Corporation, Bath, Maine; launched on 21 December 1943, sponsored by Mrs. William Kopper; and commissioned on 14 March 1944, with Commander George Knuepfer in command.

Service history

After shakedown off Bermuda, Meredith departed Boston on 8 May 1944 as an escort in a convoy, arriving Plymouth, England, on the 27th. Between 5 and 6 June, she served as escort to transports assembling for the Normandy invasion. On 6 June, Meredith gave gunfire support to the landing forces on Utah Beach. Early in the morning of the following day, while patrolling the offshore waters as a screening vessel, she struck a mine. [1] Severely damaged, with a loss of seven killed and over 50 wounded and missing, Meredith was towed to an anchorage in the Baie de la Seine to be salvaged. However, on the morning of 9 June, her seams were further opened by an enemy bombing raid and shortly after she broke in two without warning and sank. Bates rescued 163 survivors.

On 5 August 1960, the sunken hulk was sold to St. Française de Recherches of France. The hulk of the Meredith was raised and scrapped in September 1960.

Awards

Meredith received one battle star for World War II service.

Related Research Articles

USS <i>Reuben James</i> (DE-153)

USS Reuben James (DE-153) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort in the United States Navy. She was the second ship named for Reuben James, a Boatswain's Mate who distinguished himself fighting the Barbary pirates.

USS <i>De Haven</i> (DD-469) Fletcher-class destroyer

USS De Haven (DD-469) was a Fletcher-class destroyer of the United States Navy, the first Navy ship named for Lieutenant Edwin J. De Haven USN (1819–1865). De Haven was the first Fletcher-class ship lost in World War II, having been in commission only 133 days.

USS <i>Crowninshield</i> (DD-134) Wickes-class destroyer

USS Crowninshield (DD–134) was a Wickes-class destroyer in the United States Navy between World War I and World War II. She was named for Benjamin Williams Crowninshield. In World War II she was transferred to the Royal Navy where she was named HMS Chelsea, and subsequently to the Soviet Navy where she was named Derzkiy.

USS <i>Norman Scott</i> destroyer

USS Norman Scott (DD-690) was a United States Navy Fletcher-class destroyer named for Rear-Admiral Norman Scott (1889–1942), who was killed in the Naval Battle of Guadalcanal and awarded the Medal of Honor.

USS <i>Brooks</i> (DD-232) WWII US destroyer

USS Brooks (DD-232/APD-10) was a Clemson-class destroyer in the United States Navy during World War II. She was named for Lieutenant John Brooks, Jr.

USS <i>Cony</i> (DD-508) Fletcher-class destroyer

USS Cony (DD/DDE-508), a Fletcher-class destroyer, was a ship of the United States Navy named for Joseph S. Cony (1834–1867), a naval officer during the Civil War.

USS <i>Eberle</i> (DD-430) Gleaves-class destroyer of the United States Navy

USS Eberle (DD-430) was a Gleaves-class destroyer of the United States Navy. The ship is named for Rear Admiral Edward Walter Eberle, who commanded the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets and was Chief of Naval Operations from 1923 to 1927. The destroyer entered service in 1940 and spent the majority of her career in the Atlantic Ocean. Placed in reserve following the war, the ship was transferred to the Hellenic Navy in 1951. Renamed Niki, the destroyer remained in service until 1972 when she was scrapped.

USS Bates (DE-68/APD-47), a Buckley-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, was named in honor of Ensign Edward M. Bates, who was killed on board USS Arizona during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

USS <i>Earle</i> (DD-635)

USS Earle (DD-635/DMS-42), a Gleaves-class destroyer, is the only ship of the United States Navy to be named for Rear Admiral Ralph Earle.

USS <i>Davis</i> (DD-395) Somers-class destroyer

The third USS Davis (DD-395) was a Somers-class destroyer in the United States Navy. She was named for Charles Henry Davis.

USS Sims (DE-154/APD-50), a Buckley-class destroyer escort of the United States Navy, was named in honor of Admiral William Sowden Sims (1858–1936), who pushed for modernization of the navy. She is the second ship in the United States Navy to be named USS Sims.

USS <i>Epperson</i> (DD-719) Gearing-class destroyer

USS Epperson (DD/DDE-719) was a Gearing-class destroyer of the United States Navy. It was named for United States Marine Corps Private Harold G. Epperson (1923–1944) who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroism in the Battle of Saipan.

USS <i>Frament</i> (APD-77)

USS Frament (DE-677/APD-77) was a Buckley-class destroyer escort in the United States Navy. She was named for Pharmacist's Mate Third Class Paul S. Frament (1919–1942), who was posthumously awarded the Silver Star for heroism in the Guadalcanal campaign.

USS <i>Huse</i> (DE-145)

The USS Huse (DE-145) was named by the U.S. Navy in honor of Admiral Harry McLaren Pinckney Huse, who died in 1942.

USS <i>Snyder</i>

USS Snyder (DE-745) was a Cannon-class destroyer escort built for the United States Navy during World War II. She served in the Pacific Ocean and provided escort service against submarine and air attack for Navy vessels and convoys.

USS <i>Cockrill</i> (DE-398) Edsall-class destroyer escort

USS Cockrill (DE-398) was an Edsall-class destroyer escortin service with the United States Navy fom 1943 to 1946. After spending decades in reserve, she was sunk as a target in November 1974.

USS <i>Onslow</i> (AVP-48)

USS Onslow (AVP-48) was a United States Navy Barnegat-class seaplane tender in commission from 1943 to 1947 and from 1951 to 1960.

USS <i>Crosley</i> (APD-87) Crosley-class high speed transport

USS Crosley (APD-87) was a Crosley-class high speed transport that served in the United States Navy from 1944 to 1946.

HMS Kingsmill (K484) was a British Captain-class frigate of the Royal Navy in commission during World War II. Originally constructed as the United States Navy Evarts-class destroyer escort DE-280, she served in the Royal Navy from 1943 to 1945 and then in the U.S. Navy as USS Kingsmill (DE-280) from August to October 1945.

References

  1. "Meredith III (DD-726)". Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. United States Navy. Retrieved 23 April 2013.