Waveland (Marshall, Virginia)

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Waveland
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Location VA 691, Carter's Run Rd., near Marshall, Virginia
Coordinates 38°50′00″N77°51′48″W / 38.83333°N 77.86333°W / 38.83333; -77.86333 Coordinates: 38°50′00″N77°51′48″W / 38.83333°N 77.86333°W / 38.83333; -77.86333
Area 866 acres (350 ha)
Built c. 1835 (1835), 1859
Architect Lind, Edmund George
Architectural style Greek Revival
Part of Carters Run Rural Historic District (#14000236)
NRHP reference # 04000888 [1]
VLR # 030-0512
Significant dates
Added to NRHP August 20, 2004
Designated CP May 15, 2014
Designated VLR December 3, 2003 [2]

Waveland is a historic plantation house and farm located near Marshall, Fauquier County, Virginia. The mansion was built about 1835, and is a two-story, three bay by five bay, brick dwelling in the Greek Revival style. It has a front gable roof and sits on an English basement. A six-bay-wide, two bay-deep rear addition designed by noted English architect Edmund George Lind (1829–1909) was added in 1859, creating a "T"-plan dwelling. Also on the property are the contributing meat house (c. 1835), stuccoed frame farmhouse (c. 1860), cistern (c. 1835), stone spring house ruin (c. 1835), and stone slave quarters ruin (c. 1835). [3]

Marshall, Virginia Census-designated place in Virginia, United States

Marshall is a census-designated place (CDP) and unincorporated town in northwestern Fauquier County, Virginia, in the United States. The population as of the 2010 census was 1,480.

Fauquier County, Virginia County in the United States

Fauquier is a county in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 65,203. The county seat is Warrenton.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  3. Cheryl H. Shepherd (July 2003). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Waveland" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying four photos