Waverly (Middleburg, Virginia)

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Waverly
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Location South of Middleburg on VA 626, near Middleburg, Virginia
Coordinates 38°55′50″N77°44′40″W / 38.93056°N 77.74444°W / 38.93056; -77.74444 Coordinates: 38°55′50″N77°44′40″W / 38.93056°N 77.74444°W / 38.93056; -77.74444
Area 4 acres (1.6 ha)
Built c. 1790, c. 1830, c. 1850
Architect Adler, David
Architectural style Gothic Revival
NRHP reference # 79003040 [1]
VLR # 030-0226
Significant dates
Added to NRHP March 26, 1979
Designated VLR September 19, 1978 [2]

Waverly, also known as Waverley, is a historic house located near Middleburg, Fauquier County, Virginia. The original section was built about 1790, and later enlarged about 1830, and enlarged and remodeled in the 1850s. It is a single-pile, center-hall, two-story dwelling, a typical example of an I-house. It has a long, two-story rear ell and has Gothic Revival style decorative detailing. The front facade features a full-width two-story portico with six square piers supporting a flat roof with a plain wooden parapet. The house was renovated after 1940 by architect David Adler. [3]

Middleburg, Virginia Town in Virginia

Middleburg is a town in Loudoun County, Virginia, United States. The population was 673 at the 2010 census.

Fauquier County, Virginia County in the United States

Fauquier is a county in the Commonwealth of Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 65,203. The county seat is Warrenton.

I-house

The I-house is a vernacular house type, popular in the United States from the colonial period onward. The I-house was so named in the 1930s by Fred Kniffen, a cultural geographer at Louisiana State University who was a specialist in folk architecture. He identified and analyzed the type in his 1936 study of Louisiana house types. He chose the name "I-house" because of its common occurrence in the rural farm areas of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, all states beginning with the letter "I". He did not use the term to imply that this house type originated in, or was restricted to, those three states. It is also referred to as Plantation Plain style.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Peyton House, built during 1831-34 in Raymond, Mississippi, appears to have been modeled upon Waverly. [4] [5]

Peyton House (Raymond, Mississippi)

Peyton House, also known as Waverly, in Raymond, Mississippi, in central Hinds County, was built during 1831-34. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.

Raymond, Mississippi City in Mississippi, United States

Raymond is a city in Hinds County, Mississippi, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 1,933. Raymond is one of two county seats of Hinds County and is the home of the main campus of Hinds Community College.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  3. Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission Staff (August 1978). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Waverly" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying photo
  4. William C. Wright (June 20, 1973). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Peyton House / Waverly". National Park Service . Retrieved October 18, 2016. with two photos from 1972