1011

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1011 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1011
MXI
Ab urbe condita 1764
Armenian calendar 460
ԹՎ ՆԿ
Assyrian calendar 5761
Balinese saka calendar 932–933
Bengali calendar 418
Berber calendar 1961
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1555
Burmese calendar 373
Byzantine calendar 6519–6520
Chinese calendar 庚戌(Metal  Dog)
3707 or 3647
     to 
辛亥年 (Metal  Pig)
3708 or 3648
Coptic calendar 727–728
Discordian calendar 2177
Ethiopian calendar 1003–1004
Hebrew calendar 4771–4772
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1067–1068
 - Shaka Samvat 932–933
 - Kali Yuga 4111–4112
Holocene calendar 11011
Igbo calendar 11–12
Iranian calendar 389–390
Islamic calendar 401–402
Japanese calendar Kankō 8
(寛弘8年)
Javanese calendar 913–914
Julian calendar 1011
MXI
Korean calendar 3344
Minguo calendar 901 before ROC
民前901年
Nanakshahi calendar −457
Seleucid era 1322/1323 AG
Thai solar calendar 1553–1554
Tibetan calendar 阳金狗年
(male Iron-Dog)
1137 or 756 or −16
     to 
阴金猪年
(female Iron-Pig)
1138 or 757 or −15
Emperor Sanjo of Japan (976-1017) Hyakuninisshu 068.jpg
Emperor Sanjō of Japan (976–1017)

Year 1011 ( MXI ) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian Calendar.

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  • Emperor Ichijō abdicates the throne and dies later after a 25-year reign. He is succeeded by his cousin Sanjō as the 67th emperor of Japan.

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1000s (decade)

The 1000s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1000, and ended on December 31, 1009.

The 880s decade ran from January 1, 880, to December 31, 889.

The 990s decade ran from January 1, 990, to December 31, 999.

1009 Calendar year

Year 1009 (MIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1016 Calendar year

Year 1016 (MXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1017 Calendar year

Year 1017 (MXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1018 Calendar year

Year 1018 (MXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1010s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1010, and ended on December 31, 1019.

The 1030s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1030, and ended on December 31, 1039.

1036 Calendar year

Year 1036 (MXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1022 Calendar year

Year 1522 (MXXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1020 (MXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1038 Calendar year

Year 1038 (MXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

880 Calendar year

Year 880 (DCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Pandulf IV of Capua

Pandulf IV was the Prince of Capua on three separate occasions.

Melus was a Lombard nobleman from the Apulian town of Bari, whose ambition to carve for himself an autonomous territory from the Byzantine catapanate of Italy in the early eleventh century inadvertently sparked the Norman presence in Southern Italy.

Guaimar III was the Lombard prince of Salerno from around 994 to his death. Under his reign, Salerno entered an era of great splendour. Opulenta Salernum was the inscription on his coins. He made Amalfi, Gaeta and Sorrento his vassals and annexed much of Byzantine Apulia and Calabria.

Basil Mesardonites was the Catapan of Italy, representing the Byzantine Emperor there, from 1010 to 1016 or 1017. He succeeded the catapan John Kourkouas, who died fighting the Lombards, then in rebellion under Melus, early in 1010. In March, Basil disembarked with reinforcements from Constantinople and Leo Tornikios Kontoleon, the strategos of Cephalonia. Basil immediately besieged the rebels in Bari. The Greek citizens of the city negotiated with Basil and forced the Lombard leaders, Melus and Dattus, to flee. Basil entered the city on June 11, 1011 and reestablished Byzantine authority. He did not follow his victory up with any severe reactions. He simply sent the family of Melus, including his son Argyrus, to Constantinople. Basil's next move was to ally to the Roman Empire as many Lombard principalities as possible. He visited Salerno in October, where Prince Guaimar III was nominally a Byzantine vassal. He then moved on to Monte Cassino, which monastery was sheltering Dattus on its lands. Basil nevertheless confirmed all the privileges of the monastery over its property in Greek territory. The abbot, Atenulf, was a brother of the prince of Capua, Pandulf IV. The monastery then promptly expelled Dattus and he fled to papal territory. Basil held the Greek catapanate in peace until his death in 1016, or, according to Lupus Protospatharius, 1017. He was replaced by the aforementioned strategos of Cephalonia, Leo.

Dattus was a Lombard leader from Bari, the brother-in-law of Melus of Bari. He joined his brother-in-law in a 1009 revolt against Byzantine authority in southern Italy.

The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

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