1998 Czech Senate election

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Senate elections for a third of chamber were held in the Czech Republic on 13 and 14 November 1998 with a second round on 20 and 21 November. [1]

Czech Republic republic in Central Europe

The Czech Republic, also known by its short-form name, Czechia, is a landlocked country in Central Europe bordered by Germany to the west, Austria to the south, Slovakia to the east and Poland to the northeast. The Czech Republic covers an area of 78,866 square kilometres (30,450 sq mi) with a mostly temperate continental climate and oceanic climate. It is a unitary parliamentary republic, with 10.6 million inhabitants; its capital and largest city is Prague, with 1.3 million residents. Other major cities are Brno, Ostrava, Olomouc and Pilsen. The Czech Republic is a member of the European Union (EU), NATO, the OECD, the United Nations, the OSCE, and the Council of Europe.

The result was a victory for the Four-Coalition, which won 13 of the 27 seats up for election. The Coalition was an alliance of the Christian and Democratic Union – Czechoslovak People's Party, the Democratic Union, the Freedom Union and the Civic Democratic Alliance. [2] However, Civic Democratic Party remained the largest Senate fraction. Voter turnout was 41% in the first round and 20.3% in the second. [3]

Four-Coalition

The Four-Coalition, also translated as the Coalition of Four or Quad-Coalition, abbreviated to 4K, was a liberal centre-right political alliance in the Czech Republic between 1998 and 2002.

Christian and Democratic Union – Czechoslovak Peoples Party Czech political party

The Christian and Democratic Union – Czechoslovak People's Party (Czech: Křesťanská a demokratická unie – Československá strana lidová, KDU–ČSL, often shortened to lidovci is a Christian-democratic political party in the Czech Republic. The party took part in almost every Czech Government since 1990. In the June 2006 election, the party won 7.2% of the vote and 13 out of 200 seats; but in the 2010 election, this dropped to 4.4% and they lost all their seats. The party regained its parliamentary standing in the 2013 legislative election, winning 14 seats in the new parliament, thereby becoming the first party ever to return to the Chamber of Deputies after dropping out.

Democratic Union (Czech Republic)

Democratic Union was a liberal political party in the Czech Republic. It existed since 1994 and was dissolved in 2001 when it merged with Freedom Union.

The elections were held using the two-round system, with an absolute majority required to be elected.

Two-round system voting system used to elect a single winner where a second round of voting is used if no candidate wins an absolute majority in the first round

The two-round system is a voting method used to elect a single winner, where the voter casts a single vote for their chosen candidate. However, if no candidate receives the required number of votes, then those candidates having less than a certain proportion of the votes, or all but the two candidates receiving the most votes, are eliminated, and a second round of voting is held.

Results

PartyFirst roundSecond roundSeats
Votes%Votes%WonTotal+/–
Civic Democratic Party 266,37727.7210,15639.1928–4
Four-Coalition 255,78526.6166,48331.01326 [4] +5
Czech Social Democratic Party 208,84521.7121,70022.7323–2
Communist Party of Bohemia and Moravia 159,12316.531,0975.824+2
Independent Candidate38,3814.07,6551.400–1
Independents and others33,6003.5000
Invalid/blank votes131,5644,778
Total1,093,675100541,86910027810
Sources: Nohlen & Stöver

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References

  1. Dieter Nohlen & Philip Stöver (2010) Elections in Europe: A data handbook, p471 ISBN   978-3-8329-5609-7
  2. Nohlen & Stöver, p477
  3. Nohlen & Stöver, p472
  4. Number of seats won by Four-Coalition parties in 1996 and 1998 added up.