4th Parliament of King James I

Last updated

Sir Thomas Crewe, Speaker SirThomasCrewe.jpg
Sir Thomas Crewe, Speaker

The 4th Parliament of King James I was the fourth and last Parliament of England of the reign of James I of England, summoned on 30 December 1623, sitting from 19 February 1624 to 29 May 1624, and thereafter kept out of session with repeated prorogations, it was dissolved on the death of the King on 27 March 1625. [1] The Speaker of the House of Commons was Sir Thomas Crewe, the member for Aylesbury.

Contents

History

The parliament was referred to as "Fælix Parliamentum" or the "Happy Parliament" by Sir Edward Coke. [2] The three previous parliaments of James I had been a source of conflict and the King's opening address to the Commons commented on the "desire of all parties to forget past disagreements." However the parliamentary session was clouded by mutual suspicion and nearly every speech made tacit or explicit comments with reference to previous sessions. [3] Charles, Prince of Wales and the Duke of Buckingham used the Parliament to aid their push for a war against Spain. Buckingham and Charles played a large role in ensuring the impeachment of Lord High Treasurer Lionel Cranfield, who was opposed to a war for financial reasons. [4]

The Fourth Parliament sat for only one session (labelled in statutes as "21 James I"), which ran from 19 February 1624 to 29 May 1624. Its second session was scheduled to start on 2 November 1624, but it was prorogued before opening to 16 February 1625 then again to 15 March and once more to 20 April. However, before that last date arrived, King James I died (27 March 1625), and the Fourth Parliament was dissolved. [5]

Notable Acts passed in the Parliament

See also

Notes

  1. Coke 1680 , p. 2; Willis 1750 , p. 187; Ruigh 1971 , Preface
  2. Coke 1680, p. 2.
  3. Ruigh 1971, p. 2.
  4. Smith 1998, p. 63.
  5. Cobbett 1806, p. 1506.

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Coke</span>

Sir John Coke was an English civil servant and naval administrator, described by one commentator as "the Samuel Pepys of his day". He was MP for various constituencies in the House of Commons between 1621 and 1629, and served as Secretary of State under Charles I, playing a key part in government during the eleven years of Personal Rule from 1629 to 1640.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Cavalier Parliament</span> Parliament of England (1661–1679)

The Cavalier Parliament of England lasted from 8 May 1661 until 24 January 1679. It was the longest English Parliament, and longer than any Great British or UK Parliament to date, enduring for nearly 18 years of the quarter-century reign of Charles II of England. Like its predecessor, the Convention Parliament, it was overwhelmingly Royalist and is also known as the Pensioner Parliament for the many pensions it granted to adherents of the King.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Statute of Monopolies</span> 1624 English legislation

The Statute of Monopolies 1623 was an Act of the Parliament of England notable as the first statutory expression of English patent law. Patents evolved from letters patent, issued by the monarch to grant monopolies over particular industries to skilled individuals with new techniques. Originally intended to strengthen England's economy by making it self-sufficient and promoting new industries, the system gradually became seen as a way to raise money without having to incur the public unpopularity of a tax. Elizabeth I particularly used the system extensively, issuing patents for common commodities such as starch and salt. Unrest eventually persuaded her to turn the administration of patents over to the common law courts, but her successor, James I, used it even more. Despite a committee established to investigate grievances and excesses, Parliament made several efforts to further curtail the monarch's power. The result was the Statute of Monopolies, passed on 29 May 1624.

Events from the 1620s in England. This decade sees a change of monarch.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Edward Villiers (Master of the Mint)</span> English nobleman

Sir Edward Villiers was an English nobleman from Leicestershire and member of the Villiers family, whose younger half-brother George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, was a favourite of both James VI and I and his son Charles. Through his influence, Sir Edward gained various positions, including Master of the Mint, Member of Parliament for Westminster and Lord President of Munster. He died in Ireland in September 1626.

Sir Francis Barrington, 1st Baronet of Barrington Hall, Essex was a Puritan activist and politician, who was MP for Essex from 1601 to 1604, then 1620 to 1628.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Glanville</span> English politician (1586–1661)

Sir John Glanville the younger, was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1614 and 1644. He was Speaker of the English House of Commons during the Short Parliament. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Sir Henry Mildmay was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1621 and 1659. He supported the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War and was one of the Regicides of Charles I of England.

Thomas Jermyn was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1625 and 1644. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Sir Alexander Denton was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1625 and 1644. He supported the Royalists during the English Civil War. He also has a house at a grammar school in Buckinghamshire

Sir Richard Dyott was an English lawyer and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1623 and 1640. He was a Royalist during the English Civil War.

Sir Thomas Pelham, 2nd Baronet was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons of England variously between 1621 and 1654. He supported the Parliamentarian cause in the English Civil War.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Peter Heyman</span> English politician

Sir Peter Heyman (1580–1641) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1621 and 1641.

Thomas Farnfold was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1624 and 1643. The subject became a ward at age twelve and his wardship passed to the young Sir Edward Sackville before Bartholomew Rogers, the usher of the court of wards, took wardship of the subject and married him to his daughter.

Henry Coke (1591–1661) was an English politician who sat in the House of Commons variously between 1624 and 1642.

Sir Robert Pye (1585–1662) was an English courtier, administrator and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1621 and 1629. He supported the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Sir Clement Cotterell (1585–1631) was an English courtier and politician, who sat in the House of Commons from 1621 to 1624.

Sir Edward Wardour was an English office holder and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1621 and 1625.

References

Further reading