524

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
524 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 524
DXXIV
Ab urbe condita 1277
Assyrian calendar 5274
Balinese saka calendar 445–446
Bengali calendar −69
Berber calendar 1474
Buddhist calendar 1068
Burmese calendar −114
Byzantine calendar 6032–6033
Chinese calendar 癸卯(Water  Rabbit)
3220 or 3160
     to 
甲辰年 (Wood  Dragon)
3221 or 3161
Coptic calendar 240–241
Discordian calendar 1690
Ethiopian calendar 516–517
Hebrew calendar 4284–4285
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 580–581
 - Shaka Samvat 445–446
 - Kali Yuga 3624–3625
Holocene calendar 10524
Iranian calendar 98 BP – 97 BP
Islamic calendar 101 BH – 100 BH
Javanese calendar 411–412
Julian calendar 524
DXXIV
Korean calendar 2857
Minguo calendar 1388 before ROC
民前1388年
Nanakshahi calendar −944
Seleucid era 835/836 AG
Thai solar calendar 1066–1067
Tibetan calendar 阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
650 or 269 or −503
     to 
阳木龙年
(male Wood-Dragon)
651 or 270 or −502

Year 524 ( DXXIV ) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) on the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Iustinus and Opilio (or, less frequently, year 1277 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 524 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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The 510s decade ran from January 1, 510, to December 31, 519.

The 520s decade ran from January 1, 520, to December 31, 529.

480 Calendar year

Year 480 (CDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Basilius without colleague. The denomination 480 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 480s decade ran from January 1, 480, to December 31, 489.

511 Calendar year

Year 511 (DXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Felix and Secundinus. The denomination 511 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

523 Calendar year

Year 523 (DXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Maximus without colleague. The denomination 523 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

501 Calendar year

Year 501 (DI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Avienus and Pompeius. The denomination 501 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

678 Calendar year

Year 678 (DCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 678 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

465 Calendar year

Year 465 (CDLXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Hermenericus and Basiliscus. The denomination 465 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Clotilde saint and second wife of the Frankish king Clovis I

Clotilde, also known as Clothilde, Clotilda, Clotild, Rotilde etc., was a princess of the kingdom of Burgundy. She was supposedly descended from the Gothic king Athanaric and became the second wife of the Frankish king Clovis I in 493. The Merovingian dynasty to which her husband belonged ruled Frankish kingdoms for over 200 years (450–758). Venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church as well as by the Eastern Orthodox Church, she played a role in her husband's famous conversion to Christianity and, in her later years, became known for her almsgiving and penitential works of mercy. She is credited with spreading Christianity within western Europe.

Chlothar I King of the Franks

Chlothar I was a king of the Franks of the Merovingian dynasty and one of the four sons of Clovis I.

Sigismund of Burgundy King of Burgundy

Sigismund was King of the Burgundians from 516 to his death. He was the son of king Gundobad and Caretene. He succeeded his father in 516. Sigismund and his brother Godomar were defeated in battle by Clovis' sons and Godomar fled. Sigismund was taken by Chlodomer, King of Orléans, where he was kept as a prisoner. Later he, his wife and children were executed. Godomar then rallied the Burgundian army and won back his kingdom.

Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer was the second of the four sons of Clovis I, King of the Franks. On the death of his father, in 511, he divided the kingdom of the Franks with his three brothers: Theuderic I, Childebert I, and Clotaire I. Although Theuderic, the eldest, had a better claim, Chlodomer divided half of the kingdom with his two other brothers. This was the kingdom of Orléans, taken from the former kingdom of Syagrius. This kingdom included, most notably, the bishoprics of Tours, Poitiers and Orléans. Chlodomer married Guntheuc, with whom he had three sons: Theodebald, Gunthar, and Clodoald.

Ahkal Moʼ Nahb I Ajaw of Palenque

Ahkal Moʼ Nahb I, also known as Chaacal and Akul Anab I,, was an ajaw of the Maya city of Palenque. He ruled from June 5, 501 AD to his death.

Kʼinich Ahkal Moʼ Nahb III Ajaw of Palenque

Kʼinich Ahkal Moʼ Nahb III also known as Chaacal III and Akul Anab III,, was an ajaw of the Maya city of Palenque. He took the throne on 30 December 721, reigning until c.736.

Godomar II, son of king Gundobad, was king of Burgundy. He ruled Burgundy after his elder brother's death in 524 until 534.

Guntheuc was the queen of Orléans and wife of Chlodomer, king of Orléans. She later married his brother Clothar I, king of Soissons.

The Battle of Vézeronce took place on June 25, 524 near Vézeronce-Curtin in Isère, France. This battle was part of an invasion of Burgundy initiated by the four successors of the Frankish king Clovis I: Childebert I, Chlodomer, Chlothar I, and Theuderic I.

Clodoald Frankish bishop

Saint Clodoald, better known as Saint Cloud, was a Merovingian prince, grandson of Clovis I and son of Chlodomer, who preferred to renounce royalty and became a hermit and monk. Clodoald found a hill along the Seine, two leagues below Paris, in a place called Novigentum. Here among the fishermen and farmers, he led a life of solitude and prayer, and built a church, which he dedicated in honor of Martin of Tours. He is venerated as a saint in both the Catholic and Orthodox Churches.

References

  1. "Boethius (480-524) - Anicius Manlius Severinus Boetius: Of the consolation of philosophy : in five books / made English and illustrated with notes by the Right Honourable Richard Lord Viscount Preston". www.royalcollection.org.uk. Retrieved June 23, 2018.
  2. "Ireland's own 5th-century female bishop: Brigid of Kildare". The Irish Times. Retrieved June 23, 2018.