524

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
524 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 524
DXXIV
Ab urbe condita 1277
Assyrian calendar 5274
Balinese saka calendar 445–446
Bengali calendar −69
Berber calendar 1474
Buddhist calendar 1068
Burmese calendar −114
Byzantine calendar 6032–6033
Chinese calendar 癸卯(Water  Rabbit)
3220 or 3160
     to 
甲辰年 (Wood  Dragon)
3221 or 3161
Coptic calendar 240–241
Discordian calendar 1690
Ethiopian calendar 516–517
Hebrew calendar 4284–4285
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 580–581
 - Shaka Samvat 445–446
 - Kali Yuga 3624–3625
Holocene calendar 10524
Iranian calendar 98 BP – 97 BP
Islamic calendar 101 BH – 100 BH
Javanese calendar 411–412
Julian calendar 524
DXXIV
Korean calendar 2857
Minguo calendar 1388 before ROC
民前1388年
Nanakshahi calendar −944
Seleucid era 835/836 AG
Thai solar calendar 1066–1067
Tibetan calendar 阴水兔年
(female Water-Rabbit)
650 or 269 or −503
     to 
阳木龙年
(male Wood-Dragon)
651 or 270 or −502

Year 524 ( DXXIV ) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) on the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Iustinus and Opilio (or, less frequently, year 1277 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 524 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year starting on Monday is any year with 366 days that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are GF, such as the years 1912, 1940, 1968, 1996, 2024, 2052, 2080, and 2120 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2008, 2036, and 2064 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Common years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Europe

May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 244 days remaining until the end of the year.

Sigismund of Burgundy King of burgundy

Sigismund was King of the Burgundians from 516 to his death. He was the son of king Gundobad and Caretene. He succeeded his father in 516. Sigismund and his brother Godomar were defeated in battle by Clovis' sons and Godomar fled. Sigismund was taken by Chlodomer, King of Orléans, where he was kept as a prisoner. Later he, his wife and children were executed. Godomar then rallied the Burgundian army and won back his kingdom.

Orléans Prefecture and commune in Centre-Val de Loire, France

Orléans is a prefecture and commune in north-central France, about 111 kilometres southwest of Paris. It is the capital of the Loiret department and of the Centre-Val de Loire region.

Mesoamerica

November 29 is the 333rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 32 days remaining until the end of the year.

Maya civilization Mesoamerican civilization

The Maya civilization was a Mesoamerican civilization developed by the Maya peoples, and noted for its logosyllabic script—the most sophisticated and highly developed writing system in pre-Columbian Americas—as well as for its art, architecture, mathematics, calendar, and astronomical system. The Maya civilization developed in an area that encompasses southeastern Mexico, all of Guatemala and Belize, and the western portions of Honduras and El Salvador. This region consists of the northern lowlands encompassing the Yucatán Peninsula, and the highlands of the Sierra Madre, running from the Mexican state of Chiapas, across southern Guatemala and onwards into El Salvador, and the southern lowlands of the Pacific littoral plain.

Palenque former city state in Central Amrica in present-day southern Mexico

Palenque, also anciently known as Lakamha, was a Maya city state in southern Mexico that flourished in the 7th century. The Palenque ruins date from ca. 226 BC to ca. AD 799. After its decline, it was absorbed into the jungle of cedar, mahogany, and sapodilla trees, but has since been excavated and restored. It is located near the Usumacinta River in the Mexican state of Chiapas, about 130 km (81 mi) south of Ciudad del Carmen, 150 m (164 yd) above sea level. It averages a humid 26 °C (79 °F) with roughly 2160 mm (85 in) of rain a year.

Births

September 18 is the 261st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 104 days remaining until the end of the year.

583 Year

Year 583 (DLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 583 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

He Shikai (和士開) (524–571), courtesy name Yantong (彥通), was an official of the Chinese dynasty Northern Qi. He was a close associate of Emperor Wucheng prior to Emperor Wucheng's accession to the throne, and he became a powerful official during Emperor Wucheng's reign. He was criticized in traditional histories as a corrupt and incompetent official. After Emperor Wucheng's death, Emperor Wucheng's son Gao Yan the Prince of Langye was displeased with the authority that He Shikai was still wielding, and killed him in a coup in 571, but subsequently was himself killed.

Deaths

July 12 is the 193rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 172 days remaining until the end of the year.

Saint Viventiolus was the Archbishop of Lyon 514-523. Later canonized, his Feast Day is July 12.

460 Year

Year 460 (CDLX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Magnus and Apollonius. The denomination 460 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Related Research Articles

The 520s decade ran from January 1, 520, to December 31, 529.

480 Year

Year 480 (CDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Basilius without colleague. The denomination 480 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

511 Year

Year 511 (DXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Felix and Secundinus. The denomination 511 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

523 Year

Year 523 (DXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Maximus without colleague. The denomination 523 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

558 Year

Year 558 (DLVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 558 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

501 Year

Year 501 (DI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Avienus and Pompeius. The denomination 501 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 722 (DCCXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 722 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

678 Year

Year 678 (DCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 678 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

465 Year

Year 465 (CDLXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Hermenericus and Basiliscus. The denomination 465 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Theuderic I Frankish King

Theuderic I was the Merovingian king of Metz, Rheims, or Austrasia—as it is variously called—from 511 to 533 or 534.

Clotilde saint and second wife of the Frankish king Clovis I

Saint Clotilde (c.474–545), also known as Clothilde, Clotilda, Clotild, Rotilde etc., was the second wife of the Frankish king Clovis I, and a princess of the kingdom of Burgundy, supposedly descended from the Gothic king Aþana-reiks. After their marriage in 492, Clotilde and her husband founded the Merovingian dynasty which ruled for over 200 years. Venerated as a saint by the Roman Catholic Church as well as by the Eastern Orthodox, she was instrumental in her husband's famous conversion to Catholicism and, in her later years, was known for her almsgiving and penitential works of mercy. She is credited with spreading Christianity to the western world.

Chlothar I King of the Franks

Chlothar I, also called "Clotaire I" and the Old, King of the Franks, was one of the four sons of Clovis I of the Merovingian dynasty.

Chlodomer King of the Franks

Chlodomer, also spelled Clodomir or Clodomer was the second of the four sons of Clovis I, King of the Franks. On the death of his father, in 511, he divided the kingdom of the Franks with his three brothers: Theuderic I, Childebert I, and Clotaire I. Although Theuderic, the eldest, had a better claim, Chlodomer divided half of the kingdom with his two other brothers. This was the kingdom of Orléans, taken from the former kingdom of Syagrius. This kingdom included, most notably, the bishoprics of Tours, Poitiers and Orléans. Chlodomer married Guntheuc, with whom he had three sons: Theodebald, Gunthar, and Clodoald.

Ahkal Mo Nahb I Ruler of Palenque

Ahkal Mo' Nahb I, also known as Chaacal and Akul Anab I,, was an ajaw of the Maya city of Palenque. He ruled from June 5, 501 AD to his death.

Kinich Ahkal Mo Nahb III Monarch of Maya civilization

K'inich Ahkal Mo' Nahb III also known as Chaacal III and Akul Anab III,, was an ajaw of the Maya city of Palenque. He took the throne on 30 December 721, reigning until c.736.

Godomar II, son of king Gundobad, was king of Burgundy. He ruled Burgundy after his elder brother's death in 524 until 534.

Guntheuc was the wife of Chlodomer, king of Orléans. She later married his brother Clothar I, king of Soissons.

The Battle of Vézeronce took place on June 25, 524 near Vézeronce-Curtin in Isère, France. This battle was part of an invasion of Burgundy initiated by the four successors of the Frankish king Clovis I: Childebert I, Chlodomer, Chlothar I, and Theuderic I.

References

  1. "Boethius (480-524) - Anicius Manlius Severinus Boetius: Of the consolation of philosophy : in five books / made English and illustrated with notes by the Right Honourable Richard Lord Viscount Preston". www.royalcollection.org.uk. Retrieved 23 June 2018.
  2. "Ireland's own 5th-century female bishop: Brigid of Kildare". The Irish Times. Retrieved 23 June 2018.