635

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
635 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 635
DCXXXV
Ab urbe condita 1388
Armenian calendar 84
ԹՎ ՁԴ
Assyrian calendar 5385
Balinese saka calendar 556–557
Bengali calendar 42
Berber calendar 1585
Buddhist calendar 1179
Burmese calendar −3
Byzantine calendar 6143–6144
Chinese calendar 甲午(Wood  Horse)
3331 or 3271
     to 
乙未年 (Wood  Goat)
3332 or 3272
Coptic calendar 351–352
Discordian calendar 1801
Ethiopian calendar 627–628
Hebrew calendar 4395–4396
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 691–692
 - Shaka Samvat 556–557
 - Kali Yuga 3735–3736
Holocene calendar 10635
Iranian calendar 13–14
Islamic calendar 13–14
Japanese calendar N/A
Javanese calendar 525–526
Julian calendar 635
DCXXXV
Korean calendar 2968
Minguo calendar 1277 before ROC
民前1277年
Nanakshahi calendar −833
Seleucid era 946/947 AG
Thai solar calendar 1177–1178
Tibetan calendar 阳木马年
(male Wood-Horse)
761 or 380 or −392
     to 
阴木羊年
(female Wood-Goat)
762 or 381 or −391
Ruins of Lindisfarne Abbey founded by Aidan Lindisfarne Abbey and St Marys.JPG
Ruins of Lindisfarne Abbey founded by Aidan

Year 635 ( DCXXXV ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 635 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Events

By place

Byzantine Empire

Heraclius Byzantine Emperor 610–641

Heraclius was the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 610 to 641. He was responsible for introducing Greek as the Byzantine Empire's official language. His rise to power began in 608, when he and his father, Heraclius the Elder, the exarch of Africa, led a revolt against the unpopular usurper Phocas.

Military alliance alliance between different states with the purpose to cooperate militarily

A military alliance is an international agreement concerning national security, when the contracting parties agree to mutual protection and support in case of a crisis that has not been identified in advance. Military alliances differ from coalitions, as coalitions are formed for a crisis that are already known.

Kubrat Bulgarian ruler

Kubrat was the "ruler of the Onoğundur–Bulgars", credited with establishing the confederation of Old Great Bulgaria in ca. 632.

Europe

A high king is a king who holds a position of seniority over a group of other kings, without the title of emperor. Similar titles include great king and king of kings. The high kings of history usually ruled over lands of cultural unity; thus high kings differentiate from emperors who control culturally different lands, and feudal monarchs, where underlings assume lesser positions. High kings can be chosen by lesser rulers through elections, or be put into power by force through conquest of weaker kingdoms.

Domnonée is the modern French form of Domnonia or Dumnonia, an historic kingdom in northern Armorica (Brittany) founded by British immigrants from Dumnonia fleeing the Saxon invasions of Britain in the early Middle Ages. Headed by the same ruling family, it was variously separate or united with its motherland and its Latin name was used for both indiscriminately. The mainland territory of Domnonée included Trégor, Dol-de-Bretagne through to Goélo, and Penthièvre.

Brittany Historical province in France

Brittany is a cultural region in the northwest of France, covering the western part of what was known as Armorica during the period of Roman occupation. It became an independent kingdom and then a duchy before being united with the Kingdom of France in 1532 as a province governed as if it were a separate nation under the crown.

Britain

Meurig ap Tewdrig was the son of Tewdrig, and a king of the early Welsh kingdoms of Gwent and Glywysing. He was in power some time before 470 AD.

Glywysing kingdom in west Britain

Glywysing was, from the sub-Roman period to the Early Middle Ages, a petty kingdom in south-east Wales. Its people were descended from the Iron Age tribe of the Silures.

Kingdom of Gwent kingdom in South Wales

Gwent was a medieval Welsh kingdom, lying between the Rivers Wye and Usk. It existed from the end of Roman rule in Britain in about the 5th century until the Norman conquest of England in the 11th century. Along with its neighbour Glywyssing, it seems to have had a great deal of cultural continuity with the earlier Silures, keeping their own courts and diocese separate from the rest of Wales until their conquest by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn. Although it recovered its independence after his death in 1063, Gwent was the first of the Welsh kingdoms to be overrun following the Norman conquest.

Arabia

The Battle of Fahl or Battle of Pella Arabic: معركة فحل‎ was an Arab–Byzantine battle fought between the Rashidun army under Khalid ibn al-Walid Saifullah and the East Roman Empire under Theodore the Sacellarius (Saqalar), in Fahl in January 635 AD. The result was a clear victory for Khalid ibn al-Walid. Some Byzantine soldiers fled to Beisan. The Corps of Sharhabeel ibn Hasana and 'Amr ibn al-'As later captured the fortress of Beisan.

The Rashidun army was the core of the Rashidun Caliphate's armed forces during the Muslim conquests of the 7th century, serving alongside the Rashidun navy. The Rashidun army maintained a high level of discipline, strategic prowess and organization.

Khalid ibn al-Walid companion of the Islamic prophet Muhammad

Abū Sulaymān Khālid ibn al-Walīd ibn al-Mughīrah al-Makhzūmī, also known as Sayf ullah al-Maslūl was a companion of Muhammad. He is noted for his military tactics and prowess, commanding the forces of Medina under Muhammad and the forces of his immediate successors of the Rashidun Caliphate, Abu Bakr and Umar ibn Khattab. It was under his military leadership that Arabia, for the first time in history, was united under a single political entity, the Caliphate. Commanding the forces of the nascent Islamic state, Khalid was victorious in over a hundred battles, against the forces of the Byzantine-Roman Empire, Sassanid-Persian Empire, and their allies, in addition to other Arab tribes. His strategic achievements include the conquest of Arabia during the Ridda Wars, Persian Mesopotamia and Roman Syria within several years from 632 to 636. He is also remembered for his decisive victories at Yamamah, Ullais, and Firaz, and his tactical successes at Walaja and Yarmouk.

By topic

Literature

Yao Silian, courtesy name Jianzhi (簡之), formally Baron Kang of Fengcheng (豐成康男), was an official of the Chinese dynasties Sui Dynasty and Tang Dynasty and was the lead author of the Book of Liang and Book of Chen, official histories of Liang Dynasty and Chen Dynasty, which his father Yao Cha (姚察), a Chen official, had begun but did not finish.

Chinese historiography study of methods used to study Chinese history

Chinese historiography is the study of the techniques and sources used by historians to develop the recorded history of China.

The Book of Liang, was compiled under Yao Silian, completed in 635. Yao heavily relied on the original manuscript of his father Yao Cha, as his comments were quoted in several chapters.

Religion

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 630s decade ran from January 1, 630, to December 31, 639.

840 Year

Year 840 (DCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 640s decade ran from January 1, 640, to December 31, 649.

The 680s decade ran from January 1, 680, to December 31, 689.

827 Year

Year 827 (DCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

639 Year

Year 639 (DCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 639 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

750 Year

Year 750 (DCCL) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 750 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

785 Year

Year 785 (DCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The article denomination 785 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. It is still used today in this manner.

820 Year

Year 820 (DCCCXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

835 Year

Year 835 (DCCCXXXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

858 Year

Year 858 (DCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

684 Year

Year 684 (DCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 684 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

685 Year

Year 685 (DCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 685 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

687 Year

Year 687 (DCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 687 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

653 Year

Year 653 (DCLIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 653 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

663 Year

Year 663 (DCLXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 663 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

698 Year

Year 698 (DCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 698 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

675 Year

Year 675 (DCLXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 675 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

679 Year

Year 679 (DCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 679 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

721 Year

Year 721 (DCCXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 721 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

References

  1. Smith, 19 and 21