641

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
641 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 641
DCXLI
Ab urbe condita 1394
Armenian calendar 90
ԹՎ Ղ
Assyrian calendar 5391
Balinese saka calendar 562–563
Bengali calendar 48
Berber calendar 1591
Buddhist calendar 1185
Burmese calendar 3
Byzantine calendar 6149–6150
Chinese calendar 庚子(Metal  Rat)
3337 or 3277
     to 
辛丑年 (Metal  Ox)
3338 or 3278
Coptic calendar 357–358
Discordian calendar 1807
Ethiopian calendar 633–634
Hebrew calendar 4401–4402
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 697–698
 - Shaka Samvat 562–563
 - Kali Yuga 3741–3742
Holocene calendar 10641
Iranian calendar 19–20
Islamic calendar 20–21
Japanese calendar N/A
Javanese calendar 531–532
Julian calendar 641
DCXLI
Korean calendar 2974
Minguo calendar 1271 before ROC
民前1271年
Nanakshahi calendar −827
Seleucid era 952/953 AG
Thai solar calendar 1183–1184
Tibetan calendar 阳金鼠年
(male Iron-Rat)
767 or 386 or −386
     to 
阴金牛年
(female Iron-Ox)
768 or 387 or −385
Emperor Constans II (630-668) Hexagram-Constans II and Constantine IV-sb0995.jpg
Emperor Constans II (630–668)

Year 641 ( DCXLI ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 641 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013, 2019, and 2030 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Events

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Byzantine Empire

February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 323 days remain until the end of the year.

Heraclius Byzantine Emperor 610–641

Heraclius was the Emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 610 to 641. He was responsible for introducing Greek as the Byzantine Empire's official language. His rise to power began in 608, when he and his father, Heraclius the Elder, the exarch of Africa, led a revolt against the unpopular usurper Phocas.

Edema abnormal accumulation of fluid in the interstitium

Edema, also spelled oedema or œdema, is an abnormal accumulation of fluid in the interstitium, located beneath the skin and in the cavities of the body, which can cause severe pain. Clinically, hyperaldosteronism, edema manifests as swelling. The amount of interstitial fluid is determined by the balance of fluid homeostasis and the increased secretion of fluid into the interstitium. The word is from Greek οἴδημα oídēma meaning "swelling". The condition is also known as dropsy.

Europe

Aega was the mayor of the palace and regent, alongside the queen mother Nanthild, of Neustria and Burgundy from 639, on the death of Dagobert I, to his death in 641, during the reign of the minor Clovis II. He was a hardened opponent of the local Burgundian nobility. On his death, at Clichy, Nanthild replaced him in Burgundy by Flaochad, a Frank and like opponent of the local power factions. The magnates elevated Erchinoald to his mayoralty in Neustria.

Under the Merovingian dynasty, the mayor of the palace or majordomo was the manager of the household of the Frankish king. The office existed from the sixth century, and during the seventh it evolved into the "power behind the throne" in the northeastern kingdom of Austrasia. In 751, the mayor of the palace, Pepin the Short, orchestrated the deposition of the king, Childeric III, and was crowned in his place.

A regent is a person appointed to govern a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated. The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent".

Britain

Oswiu, also known as Oswy or Oswig, was King of Bernicia from 642 until his death. One of the sons of Æthelfrith of Bernicia, he became king following the death of his brother Oswald in 642. Unlike Oswald, Oswiu struggled to exert authority over Deira, the other constituent kingdom of medieval Northumbria, for much of his reign.

Bernicia was an Anglo-Saxon kingdom established by Anglian settlers of the 6th century in what is now southeastern Scotland and North East England.

Gododdin tribe of Britons native to north-eastern Britain

The Gododdin were a P-Celtic-speaking Brittonic people of north-eastern Britannia, the area known as the Hen Ogledd or Old North, in the sub-Roman period. Descendants of the Votadini, they are best known as the subject of the 6th-century Welsh poem Y Gododdin, which memorialises the Battle of Catraeth and is attributed to Aneirin.

Africa

November 8 is the 312th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 53 days remain until the end of the year.

Siege of Alexandria (641)

The major Mediterranean port of Alexandria, the capital of the Byzantine province of Egypt, was permanently seized from the Byzantine Empire by forces of the Rashidun Caliphate in the middle of the 7th Century AD. This marked the end of Eastern Roman maritime power over the Eastern Mediterranean and thus brought about a decisive geopolitical shift, also spreading the Rashidun's control further.

Amr ibn al-As Arab military commander

'Amr ibn al-'As was an Arab military commander who led the Muslim conquest of Egypt in 640. He was a contemporary of Muhammad and one of the Sahaba ("Companions") who rose quickly through the Muslim hierarchy following his conversion to Islam in the year 8 AH (629). He founded the Egyptian capital of Fustat and built the Mosque of Amr ibn al-As at its center.

Asia

Emperor Taizong of Tang emperor of the Tang Dynasty

Emperor Taizong of Tang, previously Prince of Qin, personal name Li Shimin, was the second emperor of the Tang dynasty of China, ruling from 626 to 649. He is traditionally regarded as a co-founder of the dynasty for his role in encouraging Li Yuan, his father, to rebel against the Sui dynasty at Jinyang in 617. Taizong subsequently played a pivotal role in defeating several of the dynasty's most dangerous opponents and solidifying its rule over China.

Tang dynasty State in Chinese history

The Tang dynasty or the Tang Empire was an imperial dynasty of China spanning the 7th to 10th centuries. It was preceded by the Sui dynasty and followed by the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. Historians generally regard the Tang as a high point in Chinese civilization, and a golden age of cosmopolitan culture. Tang territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, rivaled that of the Han dynasty. The Tang capital at Chang'an was the most populous city in the world in its day.

Tang campaigns against the Western Turks

The Tang campaigns against the Western Turks, known as the Western Tujue in Chinese sources, were a series of military campaigns conducted during the Tang dynasty of China against the Western Turkic Khaganate in the 7th century AD. Early military conflicts were a result of the Tang interventions in the rivalry between the Western and Eastern Turks in order to weaken both. Under Emperor Taizong, campaigns were dispatched in the Western Regions against Gaochang in 640, Karasahr in 644 and 648, and Kucha in 648.

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

842 Year

Year 842 (DCCCXLII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 640s decade ran from January 1, 640, to December 31, 649.

The 650s decade ran from January 1, 650, to December 31, 659.

The 660s decade ran from January 1, 660, to December 31, 669.

The 680s decade ran from January 1, 680, to December 31, 689.

774 Year

Year 774 (DCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 774 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

635 Year

Year 635 (DCXXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 635 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

685 Year

Year 685 (DCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 685 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

715 Year

Year 715 (DCCXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 715 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

642 Year

Year 642 (DCXLII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 642 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

654 Year

Year 654 (DCLIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 654 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

663 Year

Year 663 (DCLXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 663 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

668 Year

Year 668 (DCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 668 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Heraklonas emperor of Byzantine Empire

Constantine Heraclius, commonly known by the diminutive Heraklonas or Herakleonas, or rarely, Heraclius II, was the son of Heraclius and his niece Martina. His father had stipulated in his will that both of his sons should rule jointly upon his death. Heraclius also specified that his wife, Martina, was to be called "Mother and Empress" in so far as she might have influence at court as well. The Emperor Heraclius died in February 641 from edema. When Martina did make the late Emperor's will public she faced staunch resistance to her playing any active role in government, but both Heraklonas and Constatine III were proclaimed joint-emperors in February 641 without incidence. After Constantine died of tuberculosis in April/May 641, Heraklonas became sole emperor, under the regency of his mother due to his young age, usually dated from April/May – September/October 641, when he was overthrown by Valentinus, a general and usurper of Armenian extract, who installed Constans II, the son of Constantine III. Valentinus had Heraklonas' nose cut off, then exiled him to Rhodes, where he is believed to have died in the same year.

Constantine III (Byzantine emperor) Byzantine Emperor in 641

Constantine III was Byzantine emperor for four months in 641, making him the shortest reigning Byzantine emperor. He was the eldest son of the Byzantine Emperor Heraclius and his first wife Eudokia.

Constans II Byzantine Emperor

Constans II, also called Constantine the Bearded, was emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 641 to 668. He was the last emperor to serve as consul, in 642. Constans is a nickname given to the Emperor, who had been baptized Herakleios and reigned officially as Constantine. The nickname established itself in Byzantine texts and has become standard in modern historiography.

Martina was the second Empress consort of the Byzantine Empire by marriage to Heraclius, and Regent in 641 with her son. She was a daughter of Maria, Heraclius' sister, and a certain Martinus. Maria and Heraclius were children of Heraclius the Elder and his wife Epiphania according to the chronicle of Theophanes the Confessor.

Fausta was the Empress consort of Constans II of the Byzantine Empire

Gregoria was the Empress consort of Constantine III of the Byzantine Empire. She participated in the minor regency government of her son, Constans II, in 641.

Valentinus was a Byzantine general and usurper.

References

  1. 1 2 "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved April 21, 2019.