748

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
748 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 748
DCCXLVIII
Ab urbe condita 1501
Armenian calendar 197
ԹՎ ՃՂԷ
Assyrian calendar 5498
Balinese saka calendar 669–670
Bengali calendar 155
Berber calendar 1698
Buddhist calendar 1292
Burmese calendar 110
Byzantine calendar 6256–6257
Chinese calendar 丁亥(Fire  Pig)
3444 or 3384
     to 
戊子年 (Earth  Rat)
3445 or 3385
Coptic calendar 464–465
Discordian calendar 1914
Ethiopian calendar 740–741
Hebrew calendar 4508–4509
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 804–805
 - Shaka Samvat 669–670
 - Kali Yuga 3848–3849
Holocene calendar 10748
Iranian calendar 126–127
Islamic calendar 130–131
Japanese calendar Tenpyō 20
(天平20年)
Javanese calendar 642–643
Julian calendar 748
DCCXLVIII
Korean calendar 3081
Minguo calendar 1164 before ROC
民前1164年
Nanakshahi calendar −720
Seleucid era 1059/1060 AG
Thai solar calendar 1290–1291
Tibetan calendar 阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
874 or 493 or −279
     to 
阳土鼠年
(male Earth-Rat)
875 or 494 or −278
Duke Tassilo III of Bavaria while hunting Meister der Pollinger Tafeln 002.jpg
Duke Tassilo III of Bavaria while hunting

Year 748 ( DCCXLVIII ) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 748 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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The 750s decade ran from January 1, 750, to December 31, 759.

The 740s decade ran from January 1, 740, to December 31, 749.

The 720s decade ran from January 1, 720, to December 31, 729.

The 660s decade ran from January 1, 660, to December 31, 669.

The 900s decade ran from January 1, 900, to December 31, 909.

844 Year

Year 844 (DCCCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

806 Year

Year 806 (DCCCVI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

743 Year

Year 743 (DCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 743 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 747 (DCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 747 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

762 Year

Year 762 (DCCLXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 762 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

662 Year

Year 662 (DCLXII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 662 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

700 700

700 (DCC)

Year 725 (DCCXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 725 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

870 Year

Year 870 (DCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

932 Year

Year 932 (CMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Abu Muslim Abd al-Rahman ibn Muslim al-Khurasani, was a Persian general in service of the Abbasid dynasty, who led the Abbasid Revolution that toppled the Umayyad dynasty.

Naṣr ibn Sayyār al-Lāythi al-Kināni was an Arab general and the last Umayyad governor of Khurasan in 738–748. Nasr played a distinguished role in the wars against the Turgesh, although he failed to decisively confront the rebellion of al-Harith ibn Surayj in its early stages. Although respected as a soldier and a statesman, he owed his appointment as governor more to his obscure tribal background, which rendered him dependent on the Caliph. His tenure was nevertheless successful, as Nasr introduced long-overdue tax reforms that alleviated social tension and largely restored and stabilized Umayyad control in Transoxiana, which had been greatly reduced under the Turgesh onslaught. His last years were occupied by intertribal rivalries and uprisings, however, as the Caliphate itself descended into a period of civil war. In 746 Nasr was driven from his capital by Ibn Surayj and Juday al-Kirmani, but returned after the latter fell out among themselves, resulting in Ibn Surayj's death. Preoccupied with this conflict, Nasr was unable to stop the outbreak and spread of the Abbasid Revolution, whose leader, Abu Muslim, exploited the situation to his advantage. Evicted from his province in early 748, he fled to Iran pursued by the Abbasid forces, where he died on 9 December 748.

Qahtaba ibn Shabib al-Ta'i was a follower of the Abbasids from Khurasan who played a leading role in the Abbasid Revolution against the Umayyad Caliphate.

The Abbasid Revolution, also called the Movement of the Men of the Black Raiment, was the overthrow of the Umayyad Caliphate, the second of the four major Caliphates in early Islamic history, by the third, the Abbasid Caliphate. Coming to power three decades after the death of the Muslim prophet Muhammad and immediately after the Rashidun Caliphate, the Umayyads were a feudal Arab empire ruling over a population which was overwhelmingly non-Arab as well as primarily non-Muslim. Non-Arabs were treated as second-class citizens regardless of whether or not they converted to Islam, and this discontent cutting across faiths and ethnicities ultimately led to the Umayyads' overthrow. The Abbasid family claimed to have descended from al-Abbas, an uncle of the Prophet.

Abu Hatim al-Harith ibn Surayj ibn Yazid ibn Sawa ibn Ward ibn Murra ibn Sufyan ibn Mujashi was an Arab leader of a large-scale social rebellion against the Umayyad Caliphate in Khurasan and Transoxiana. Harith's rebellion began in 734 and represented the grievances of both the local Arab settlers as well as the native Iranian converts (mawali), who were not recognized as equal to the Arab Muslims, against the Umayyad regime. Harith based his revolt on religious grounds and won over a large part of both the Arab settlers and the native population, but failed twice to capture the provincial capital of Marw. The rebellion was finally suppressed by Asad ibn Abdallah al-Qasri in 736. Along with a few supporters, Harith escaped capture and allied himself with the heathen Türgesh. Harith accompanied the Türgesh khagan Suluk in his invasion deep into Arab territory, which was decisively beaten back in the Battle of Kharistan in 737. With Türgesh power collapsing thereafter, Harith remained in Transoxiana supported by the native princes. Asad's successor, Nasr ibn Sayyar, campaigned against Harith and his native supporters, but eventually, hoping to use him to bolster his position in the Arab intertribal rivalries, Nasr secured for Harith a pardon from the Caliph. Harith returned to Marw in 745. Soon however he raised a sizeable armed force and challenged Nasr's authority, until he was killed in a clash with his ally Juday' al-Kirmani in 746. His revolt weakened Arab power in Central Asia and facilitated the beginning of the Abbasid Revolution that would overthrow the Umayyads.

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