Danlayer

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HMS Sir Galahad, a Round Table-class trawler displacing 440 long tons, was converted to a danlayer in 1944 and used to support the Normandy landings HMS Sir Galahad.jpg
HMS Sir Galahad, a Round Table-class trawler displacing 440 long tons, was converted to a danlayer in 1944 and used to support the Normandy landings

A danlayer was a type of vessel assigned to minesweeping flotillas during and immediately after World War II. They were usually small trawlers, fitted for the purpose of laying dans. A dan is a marker buoy which consists of a long pole moored to the seabed and fitted to float vertically, usually with a coded flag at the top.

Contents

Dan laying was an important part of minesweeping, and boats were fitted specifically for this purpose. The task of a danlayer was to follow the minesweepers as they worked an area, and lay the dans which defined the area swept and made it obvious where the clear channels were. This would also help the minesweepers cover areas accurately without gaps and unnecessary overlaps. [1] A danlayer worked with a minesweeper flotilla when large areas of sea were to be clear-swept.

List of danlayers

Germany

Since Germany had been an exponent of mine warfare since the 1920s, it was natural that the Kriegsmarine used a number of danlayers during World War II. Danlayers of the Kriegsmarine included the following vessels:

United Kingdom

Danlayers employed by the Royal Navy during the extensive mine clearance operations following World War II included the following Isles-classtrawlers.

Two Round Table-classtrawlers, Sir Lanceleot (T228) and Sir Galahad (T226) were converted from minesweepers to danlayers prior to the Normandy landings.

In 1944, prior to the Allied invasion of Normandy, the Admiralty-type Motor Mine Sweepers Nos. 141, 142, 238, 239, 240, and 241 were converted to danlayers and redesignated as follows: HMS Burfin, HMS Cottel, HMS Fichot, HMS Jude, HMS Quirpon, HMS St. Barbe, respectively. All were twin-screw, wooden, 105-foot, coastal-minesweeping sloops that were financed by Steers Ltd. of St. John’s, Newfoundland, and built by Henry Stone in his shipyard at Monroe, Trinity Bay, Newfoundland, Canada between 1941 and 1943.

New Zealand

Danlayers employed by the Royal New Zealand Navy during World War II

Notes

  1. McDougall RJ, New Zealand Naval Vessels, p. 55. Wellington, NZ: Government Printing Office, 1989. ISBN   978-0-477-01399-4

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