Editorial

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Editorial from a 1921 issue of Photoplay recommending that readers not watch a film, which featured nude scenes Heedless Moths (1921) - Photoplay Editorial.jpg
Editorial from a 1921 issue of Photoplay recommending that readers not watch a film, which featured nude scenes

An editorial, leading article (US) or leader (UK), is an article written by the senior editorial people or publisher of a newspaper, magazine, or any other written document, often unsigned. Australian and major United States newspapers, such as The New York Times [1] and The Boston Globe , [2] often classify editorials under the heading "opinion".

Contents

Illustrated editorials may appear in the form of editorial cartoons. [3]

Typically, a newspaper's editorial board evaluates which issues are important for their readership to know the newspaper's opinion on. [4]

Editorials are typically published on a dedicated page, called the editorial page, which often features letters to the editor from members of the public; the page opposite this page is called the op-ed page and frequently contains opinion pieces (hence the name think pieces) by writers not directly affiliated with the publication. However, a newspaper may choose to publish an editorial on the front page. In the English-language press, this occurs rarely and only on topics considered especially important; it is more common, however, in some European countries such as Denmark, Spain, Italy, and France. [5]

Many newspapers publish their editorials without the name of the leader writer. Tom Clark, leader-writer for The Guardian , says that it ensures readers discuss the issue at hand rather than the author. [6] On the other hand, an editorial does reflect the position of a newspaper and the head of the newspaper, the editor, is known by name. Whilst the editor will often not write the editorial themselves, they maintain oversight and retain responsibility. [7]

In the field of fashion publishing, the term is often used to refer to photo -editorials – features with often full-page photographs on a particular theme, designer, model or other single topic, with or (as in a photo-essay) without accompanying text. [8]

See also

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Graeme MacKay

Graeme MacKay is the Hamilton Spectator's resident editorial cartoonist. Born in 1968, grew up in Dundas, Ontario. A graduate from Parkside High School in Dundas, Graeme attended the University of Ottawa majoring in History and Political Science. There he submitted cartoons to the student newspaper, The Fulcrum, and was elected as graphics editor by newspaper staff. Between 1989 and 1991 he illustrated and, along with writer Paul Nichols, co-wrote a weekly comic strip, entitled "Alas & Alack", a satire of current day public figures framed in a medieval setting.

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References

  1. Staff (23 May 2012). "Opinion". The New York Times . Retrieved 23 May 2012.
  2. Staff (23 May 2012). "Opinion". The Boston Globe . Retrieved 23 May 2012.
  3. Staff (2012). "AAEC The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists". The Association of American Editorial Cartoonists. Retrieved 23 May 2012.
  4. Passante, Christopher K. (2007). The Complete Idiot's Guide to Journalism – Editorials. Penguin. p. 28. ISBN   978-1-59257-670-8 . Retrieved 21 February 2010.
  5. Christie Silk (15 June 2009). "Front Page Editorials: a Stylist Change for the Future?". Editors' Weblog. World Editors' Forum. Retrieved 1 July 2011.
  6. Clark, Tom (10 January 2011). "Why do editorials remain anonymous?". The Guardian . Retrieved 26 May 2018.
  7. Crean, Mike (2011). First with the news: an illustrated history. Auckland: Random House. p. 97. ISBN   978-1-86979-562-7.
  8. "Various editorials". models.com. Retrieved 3 April 2012.