Column (periodical)

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A newspaper column by Don Marquis Don Marquis column.gif
A newspaper column by Don Marquis

A column is a recurring piece or article in a newspaper, magazine or other publication, where a writer expresses their own opinion in few columns allotted to them by the newspaper organisation. Columns are written by columnists.

Contents

What differentiates a column from other forms of journalism is that it is a regular feature in a publication – written by the same writer or reporter and usually on the same subject area or theme each time – and that it typically, but not universally, contains the author's opinion or point of view.

Types

Some types of newspaper columns are:

Awards

The Pulitzer Prize for Commentary is often awarded for commentary appearing in a column.

See also

Related Research Articles

Commentary or commentaries may refer to:

<i>The Economist</i> English weekly news and international affairs publication

The Economist is an international weekly newspaper printed in magazine-format and published digitally that focuses on current affairs, international business, politics, and technology. Based in London, England, the newspaper is owned by The Economist Group, with core editorial offices in the United States, as well as across major cities in continental Europe, Asia, and the Middle East. In August 2015, Pearson sold its 50% stake in the newspaper to the Italian Agnelli family's investment company, Exor, for £469 million and the paper re-acquired the remaining shares for £182 million. In 2019, their average global print circulation was over 909,476, while combined with their digital presence, runs to over 1.6 million. Across their social media platforms, it reaches an audience of 35 million, as of 2016. The newspaper has a prominent focus on data journalism and analysis over original reporting, to both criticism and acclaim.

Columnist someone who writes for publication in a series, creating an article that usually offers commentary and opinions

A columnist is a person who writes for publication in a series, creating an article that usually offers commentary and opinions.

An opinion piece is an article, usually published in a newspaper or magazine, that mainly reflects the author's opinion about a subject. Opinion pieces are featured in many periodicals.

An op-ed, short for "opposite the editorial page", is a written prose piece typically published by a newspaper or magazine which expresses the opinion of an author usually not affiliated with the publication's editorial board. Op-eds are different from both editorials and letters to the editor.

<i>The Tartan</i> (Carnegie Mellon University)

The Tartan, formerly known as The Carnegie Tartan, is the original student newspaper of Carnegie Mellon University. Publishing since 1906, it is one of Carnegie Mellon's largest and oldest student organizations. It currently has over 170 student members, who contribute on a weekly basis. It is funded by advertisements and the university's student activities fee.

<i>The Sun</i> (Malaysia) free tabloid newspaper from Malaysia

The Sun is Malaysia's first national free daily newspaper in tabloid form. Available from Mondays to Fridays except on public holiday, with a target audience of white-collar workers and urban youth.

Calvin Trillin American journalist

Calvin Marshall Trillin is an American journalist, humorist, food writer, poet, memoirist and novelist.

The editorial board is a group of experts, usually at a publication, who dictate the tone and direction the publication's editorial policy will take.

The Australian Financial Review is an Australian business and finance newspaper published by Nine Publishing six days a week. The Financial Review is informally referred to as the Fin or the Fin Review. Its satellite publications include Financial Review Smart Investor, Financial Review Asset and BRW. Financial Review Sunday—a TV program developed in partnership with the Nine Network—launched on 5 May 2013. Two inserted monthly magazines come with the newspaper: the Financial Review Magazine and Financial Review BOSS.

Letter to the editor letter sent to a publication

A letter to the editor is a letter sent to a publication about issues of concern from its readers. Usually, letters are intended for publication. In many publications, letters to the editor may be sent either through conventional mail or electronic mail.

<i>Louisville Eccentric Observer</i> newspaper in Louisville, Kentucky

The Louisville Eccentric Observer is a privately owned free urban alternative weekly newspaper, distributed every Wednesday in about 700 locations throughout the Louisville, Kentucky, metropolitan area, including areas of southern Indiana. The newspaper was founded in 1990 by John Yarmuth, Robert Schulman, Denny Crum, and two other investors. According to The Media Audit the LEO has a weekly readership of 88,807 and an unduplicated monthly readership of 136,478.

<i>Portland Mercury</i> American alternative weekly newspaper

Portland Mercury is an alternative bi-weekly newspaper and media company founded in 2000 in Portland, Oregon. Its revenue model is strongly connected on advertisement and sales of tickets for events and concerts. Nearly 95% of its revenue comes from advertisement.

A feuilleton was originally a kind of supplement attached to the political portion of French newspapers, consisting chiefly of non-political news and gossip, literature and art criticism, a chronicle of the latest fashions, and epigrams, charades and other literary trifles. The term feuilleton was invented by the editors of the French Journal des débats; Julien Louis Geoffroy and Bertin the Elder, in 1800. The feuilleton has been described as a "talk of the town", and a contemporary English-language example of the form is the "Talk of the Town" section of The New Yorker.

<i>AsianWeek</i>

AsianWeek was America’s first and largest English language print and on-line publication serving Asian Americans. The news organization played an important role nationally and in the San Francisco Bay Area as the “Voice of Asian America”. It provided news coverage across all Asian ethnic groups.

The Daily Campus, founded in 1896, is a student-run newspaper at the University of Connecticut that has a circulation run of 5,000 copies weekdays during the school. The Daily Campus has the largest circulation of any college paper in Connecticut and the third-largest in New England, behind The Daily Collegian (UMass) and The Harvard Crimson. Since its creation, the newspaper has undergone several name changes, starting as The Storrs Agricultural College Lookout, a monthly, when it published its first issue on May 11, 1896. The name was changed to The Connecticut Campus in 1915, followed by The Connecticut Daily Campus, and then finally just The Daily Campus in 1984. It began publishing five days a week during the academic year in 1952 and became a morning paper in 1955.

Jonathan S. Tobin is an American journalist. He is editor in chief of JNS.org, the Jewish News Syndicate.

Causerie is a literary style of short informal essays mostly unknown in the English-speaking world. A causerie is generally short, light and humorous and is often published as a newspaper column. Often the causerie is a current-opinion piece, but it contains more verbal acrobatics and humor than a regular opinion or column. In English, causerie is commonly known as "personal story", "talk of the town", "funny story" or "column" instead.

LAS Magazine, also known as Lost At Sea or LostAtSea.net, is a daily online magazine founded in 1998 by Eric J Herboth. An online social group for the magazine list it in the "Entertainment & Arts - Online Media" category with a description of "Art. Bike. Music. Media. Literature. Photography. Travel. Comics. Festivals. Sports? Yeah, a bit of that, too. Updated whenever, forever, since 1998." The magazine includes writing and photography contributions from Canada, Mexico, the United States, England, Scotland, Spain, Portugal, Germany, Switzerland, France, South Africa, Australia, Japan, New Zealand and Washington DC, but the publication maintains no fixed office.

Editorial journalism genre

An editorial, leading article (US) or leader (UK), is an article written by the senior editorial staff or publisher of a newspaper, magazine, or any other written document, often unsigned. Australian and major United States newspapers, such as The New York Times and The Boston Globe, often classify editorials under the heading "opinion".

References