Endangered mammals of India

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Endangered mammals of India are the mammal species in India that are listed as threatened in the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Animals

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Background

In India, mammals comprise 410 species, 186 genera, 45 families and 13 orders of which nearly 89 species are listed as threatened in the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Animals (IUCN 2006). [1] This includes two species that are locally extinct from India viz. Acinonyx jubatus and Rhinoceros sondaicus . [1]

The mammals are the class of vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of mammary glands, which in females produce milk for the nourishment of young; the presence of hair or fur; specialized teeth; the presence of a neocortex region in the brain; and endothermic or "warm-blooded" bodies. The brain regulates endothermic and circulatory system, including a four-chambered heart. Mammals encompass some 5,500 species (including Humans), distributed in about 1,200 genera, 152 families and up to 46 orders, though this varies with the classification scheme.

Endangered mammals

[2]

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Indian Mammals". archive.is. 2007-07-04. Archived from the original on 2007-07-04. Retrieved October 5, 2006.
  2. "Threatened Mammals of India" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2007-01-05. Retrieved 2019-09-18.