FIFA Women's World Cup hosts

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Map of FIFA Women's World Cup final hosts, 1991-2019. Women's World cup hosts.png
Map of FIFA Women's World Cup final hosts, 1991–2019.

Six countries have been chosen FIFA Women's World Cup hosts in the competition's eight editions from the inaugural tournament in 1991 until the next planned tournament in 2019.

FIFA Womens World Cup Association football competition for womens national teams

The FIFA Women's World Cup is an international football competition contested by the senior women's national teams of the members of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport's international governing body. The competition has been held every four years since 1991, when the inaugural tournament, then called the FIFA Women's World Championship, was held in China. The tournament's current format, national teams vie for 23 slots in a three-year qualification phase. The host nation's team is automatically entered as the 24th slot. The tournament proper, alternatively called the World Cup Finals, is contested at venues within the host nation(s) over a period of about one month.

1991 FIFA Womens World Cup 1991 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 1991 FIFA Women's World Cup was the inaugural FIFA Women's World Cup, the world championship for women's national association football teams. It took place in Guangdong, China from 16 to 30 November 1991. FIFA, football's international governing body selected China as host nation as Guangdong had hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. Matches were played in the state capital, Guangzhou, as well as in Foshan, Jiangmen and Zhongshan. The competition was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup.

2019 FIFA Womens World Cup 2019 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup was the eighth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial international football championship contested by 24 women's national teams representing member associations of FIFA. It took place between 7 June and 7 July 2019, with 52 matches staged in nine cities in France, which was awarded the right to host the event in March 2015, the first time the country hosted the tournament. The tournament was the first Women's World Cup to use the video assistant referee (VAR) system.

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The decision to hold the first tournament in China was made by FIFA, football's international governing body, after China hosted a prototype world championship three years earlier, the 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament. The first Women's World Cup was sponsored by Mars, Incorporated. With FIFA still reluctant to bestow their "World Cup" brand, the tournament was officially known as the 1st FIFA World Championship for Women's Football for the M&M's Cup. [1] [2]

Prototype early sample or model built to test a concept or process

A prototype is an early sample, model, or release of a product built to test a concept or process or to act as a thing to be replicated or learned from. It is a term used in a variety of contexts, including semantics, design, electronics, and software programming. A prototype is generally used to evaluate a new design to enhance precision by system analysts and users. Prototyping serves to provide specifications for a real, working system rather than a theoretical one. In some design workflow models, creating a prototype is the step between the formalization and the evaluation of an idea.

1988 FIFA Womens Invitation Tournament

The 1988 FIFA Women's Invitation Tournament, or International Women's Football Tournament, was organized by FIFA in China from 1 to 12 June 1988. The competition was a test to study if a global women's World Cup was feasible following the experience of non-FIFA invitational competitions such as the Mundialito (1984–88) and the Women's World Invitational Tournament (1978–87). The competition was a success and on 30 June FIFA approved the establishment of an official World Cup for 1991, which would also be held in China.

Mars, Incorporated is an American global manufacturer of confectionery, pet food, and other food products and a provider of animal care services, with US$33 billion in annual sales in 2015. It was ranked as the 6th largest privately held company in the United States by Forbes. Headquartered in McLean, Virginia, United States, the company is entirely owned by the Mars family. Mars operates in five business segments around the world: Mars Wrigley Confectionary, Petcare, Food, Drinks, and Symbioscience, the company's life sciences division.

Only China and the United States have hosted the event on more than one occasion. The 2003 edition was originally awarded to China, but was moved to the United States in May 2003 due to the SARS outbreak. China were instead awarded the right to host the following edition in 2007. [3]

2003 FIFA Womens World Cup 2003 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup was the fourth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, the quadrennial championship of women's association football teams organized by FIFA. It was held in the United States from 20 September to 12 October 2003 at six venues in six cities across the country. The tournament was won by Germany, who became the first country to win both men's and women's World Cup.

2007 FIFA Womens World Cup 2007 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

The 2007 FIFA Women's World Cup, the fifth edition of the FIFA Women's World Cup, was an international association football competition for women held in China from 10 to 30 September 2007. Originally, China was to host the 2003 edition, but the outbreak of SARS in that country forced that event to be moved to the United States. FIFA immediately granted the 2007 event to China, which meant that no new host nation was chosen competitively until the voting was held for the 2011 Women's World Cup.

List of hosts

YearHostContinentWinnerResult of the host
1991 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China Asia Flag of the United States.svg  United States Quarter-finals
1995 Flag of Sweden.svg  Sweden Europe Flag of Norway.svg  Norway
1999 Flag of the United States.svg  United States North America Flag of the United States.svg  United States Champions
2003 Flag of the United States.svg  United States (2) North America Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Third Place
2007 Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China (2) Asia Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Quarter-finals
2011 Flag of Germany.svg  Germany Europe Flag of Japan.svg  Japan
2015 Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada North America Flag of the United States.svg  United States
2019 Flag of France.svg  France Europe
2023 TBA

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United States womens national soccer team Womens national association football team representing the United States

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2015 FIFA Womens World Cup 2015 edition of the FIFA Womens World Cup

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2019 FIFA Womens World Cup Final association football match

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References

  1. Wahl, Grant (6 June 2019). "How the Women's World Cup and USWNT Were Built From Scratch". Sports Illustrated . Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  2. Murray, Caitlin (2019). The National Team: The Inside Story of the Women Who Changed Soccer. New York: Abrams Press. pp. 9–10. ISBN   978-1-4197-3449-6. OCLC   1090417335.
  3. Longman, Jere (27 May 2003). "U.S. Replaces China As Host of Soccer's Women's World Cup". The New York Times . p. D1. Retrieved 12 July 2019.