Gering, Nebraska

Last updated
Gering, Nebraska
Gering, Nebraska 10th from M 2.JPG
Downtown at 10th North and M Street
Scotts Bluff County Nebraska Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Gering Highlighted.svg
Location within Scotts Bluff County and Nebraska
Coordinates: 41°49′27″N103°39′54″W / 41.82417°N 103.66500°W / 41.82417; -103.66500 Coordinates: 41°49′27″N103°39′54″W / 41.82417°N 103.66500°W / 41.82417; -103.66500
CountryUnited States
State Nebraska
County Scotts Bluff
Founded1887
Government
  MayorTony Kaufman
Area
[1]
  Total4.30 sq mi (11.14 km2)
  Land4.30 sq mi (11.14 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
[2]
3,911 ft (1,192 m)
Population
 (2010) [3]
  Total8,500
  Estimate 
(2019) [4]
8,128
  Density1,890.23/sq mi (729.90/km2)
Time zone UTC−7 (Mountain (MST))
  Summer (DST) UTC−6 (MDT)
ZIP code
69341
Area code(s) 308
FIPS code 31-18580
GNIS feature ID0829493 [2]
Website gering.org

Gering is a city in, and the county seat of, Scotts Bluff County, [5] in the Panhandle region of Nebraska, United States. The population was 8,500 at the 2010 census.

Contents

History

Gering was officially founded on March 7, 1887, [6] being located at the base of the bluff that is now the center of Scotts Bluff National Monument. Although settled in 1886, Gering officially became a town in 1887 by a corporation headed by Oscar Gardner of Broken Bow, Nebraska and named for Martin Gering, a pioneer merchant with whom Gardner started the first dry goods store. Gardner, who was also a lawyer and Gering's first notary public, [6] started the post office 1887, becoming Gering's first Postmaster. [6] [7] Union Pacific Railroad platted the town in 1887, but did not lay any track until 1910. [8] In November 1888, Scottsbluff county split from Cheyenne county, and Gering became the new county seat. The city of Scottsbluff was founded across the North Platte River from the bluff in 1899, by a subsidiary of the Burlington Railroad, and had track and a makeshift depot by 1900. [8] Separated only by the river, the two cities have since grown together and now form the 7th largest urban area in Nebraska.

Gering has been served since its founding by the Gering Courier newspaper. [9]

Geography

Gering is located at 41°49′27″N103°39′54″W / 41.82417°N 103.66500°W / 41.82417; -103.66500 (41.824251, -103.665009). [10] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.30 square miles (11.14 km2), all of it land. [11]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1900 433
1910 62744.8%
1920 2,508300.0%
1930 2,5310.9%
1940 3,10422.6%
1950 3,84223.8%
1960 4,58519.3%
1970 5,63923.0%
1980 7,76037.6%
1990 7,9462.4%
2000 7,751−2.5%
2010 8,5009.7%
2019 (est.)8,128 [4] −4.4%
U.S. Decennial Census [12]
2012 Estimate [13]

Gering is part of the Scottsbluff, Nebraska Micropolitan Statistical Area.

2010 census

At the 2010 census there were 8,500 people, 3,361 households, and 2,278 families living in the city. The population density was 1,976.7 inhabitants per square mile (763.2/km2). There were 3,601 housing units at an average density of 837.4 per square mile (323.3/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.6% White, 0.6% African American, 1.5% Native American, 0.4% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 5.5% from other races, and 2.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.2%. [3]

Of the 3,361 households 32.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.8% were married couples living together, 11.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.5% had a male householder with no wife present, and 32.2% were non-families. 28.1% of households were one person and 14.7% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 2.99.

The median age was 38.7 years. 25.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.5% were from 25 to 44; 26.3% were from 45 to 64; and 17.1% were 65 or older. The gender makeup of the city was 46.9% male and 53.1% female.

2000 census

At the 2000 census, there were 7,751 people, 3,173 households, and 2,170 families living in the city. The population density was 2,067.8 people per square mile (798.0/km2). There were 3,332 housing units at an average density of 888.9 per square mile (343.1/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.48% White, 0.13% African American, 1.14% Native American, 0.25% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 5.56% from other races, and 1.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 13.40% of the population.

Of the 3,173 households 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.3% were married couples living together, 10.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.6% were non-families. 28.5% of households were one person and 14.9% were one person aged 65 or older. The average household size was 2.39 and the average family size was 2.93.

The age distribution was 24.6% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 25.0% from 25 to 44, 23.8% from 45 to 64, and 18.6% 65 or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.1 males.

The median household income was $35,185, and the median family income was $42,378. Males had a median income of $32,750 versus $22,026 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,775. About 5.9% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.3% of those under age 18 and 7.4% of those age 65 or over.

Major events

In 1922, Gering started its annual Oregon Trail Days, a celebration that takes place during the second week of July each year. Friends, families, Gering High School classmates, and the Old Settlers reunion all congregate in Gering for a weekend full of activities.

The Oregon Trail Days weekend kicks off with the community barbecue on Thursday night. Friday morning is the Annual Kiddie Parade on 10th Street, with the International Food Fair in Downtown Gering Friday night. Saturday morning the community gathers for the annual Oregon Trail Days Parade. This is followed by the annual Chili-Cookoff in Oregon Trail Park, and a concert at Five Rocks Amphitheater on Saturday evening.

Notable people

Points of interest

International sister cities

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References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 26, 2020.
  2. 1 2 U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Gering, Nebraska
  3. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-06-24.
  4. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  5. "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  6. 1 2 3 "History of Gering" (PDF).
  7. Shumway, Grant Lee (1921). History of Western Nebraska and Its People. Western publishing & engraving Company. p. 449.
  8. 1 2 "Trains and Cranes: Building a Community". National Park Service. Archived from the original on 5 July 2019. Retrieved 10 June 2020.
  9. "Past, Present and Future". The Alliance Herald. February 24, 1916. Retrieved August 10, 2019.
  10. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  11. "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2012-01-25. Retrieved 2012-06-24.
  12. United States Census Bureau. "Census of Population and Housing" . Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  13. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Archived from the original on October 19, 2013. Retrieved October 16, 2013.
  14. "Five Rocks Amphitheater". Visit The Scotts Bluff Area. 2012-06-05. Retrieved 2016-03-04.
  15. "Platte River Basin Environments : Wildlife Habitat Lands". www.nebwild.org. Retrieved 2016-03-04.
  16. "Platte River Basin Environments : Wildlife Habitat Lands". www.nebwild.org. Retrieved 2016-03-04.
  17. "Cities in Afghanistan and Nebraska forge "sister cities" partnership". reliefweb.int. Retrieved 17 April 2018.