Karen Rolton

Last updated

Karen Rolton
Krolton.jpg
Personal information
Full nameKaren Louise Rolton
Born (1974-11-21) 21 November 1974 (age 46)
Adelaide, South Australia Australia
BattingLeft-handed
BowlingLeft-arm medium
Role Batter
International information
National side
Test debut(cap  127)28 February 1995 v  New Zealand
Last Test10 July 2009 v  England
ODI debut(cap  77)14 February 1995 v  New Zealand
Last ODI5 July 2009 v  England
ODI shirt no.21
T20I debut(cap  10)2 September 2005 v  England
Last T20I25 June 2009 v  England
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
1994/95–2010/11 South Australia
Career statistics
Competition WTest WODI WT20I
Matches1414115
Runs scored1,0024,814405
Batting average 55.6648.1450.62
100s/50s2/58/330/2
Top score209* 154* 96*
Balls bowled1,1043,26736
Wickets 14853
Bowling average 23.3520.8112.33
5 wickets in innings 000
10 wickets in match000
Best bowling2/64/292/26
Catches/stumpings 9/–25/–6/–
Source: ESPNcricinfo, 2 January 2017

Karen Louise Rolton (born 21 November 1974) is an Australian former cricketer and captain of the national women's team. A left-handed batter, she has scored the most runs for her country in women's Test cricket. [1]

Contents

International cricket

After making her international debut in 1995, Rolton went on to become a member of two successful world championship campaigns. [2] [3] In the final of the 2005 Women's Cricket World Cup, she scored 107 not out and was adjudged Player of the Match. [3] Her numerous individual honours include being named ICC Women's Cricketer of the Year in 2006 and winning the Belinda Clark Award four times. [4] [5] New Zealand coach Steve Jenkin once remarked that the best tactic against her was to avoid dismissing the Australian team's openers so she could not bat. [6]

In 2006, Rolton became the captain of the national team, taking over from Belinda Clark. [7] She led Australia in the 2009 Women's Cricket World Cup on home soil, although the team performed below expectations and finished in fourth place. [8] [9]

Records and statistics

Across 14 Test matches, Rolton scored 1,002 runs at an average of 55.66 which included two centuries and five half-centuries. She made her top score of 209 not out against England at Headingley in 2001, a world record at the time. [1] She also scored 4,814 runs at 48.14 in Women's One Day Internationals. [2] Rolton became the first player to score a century in the knockout stage of a Women's Cricket World Cup and set a record for the highest individual score on debut in Women's Twenty20 Internationals with 96 not out. [10] [11] [12] In addition to her batting prowess, she enjoyed success as a left-arm medium-pace bowler, taking 102 international wickets across all three formats. [2]

Retirement and post-career

In January 2010, Rolton announced her retirement from international cricket after a 14-year career. [13] She continued to play domestic cricket for South Australia until the end of the 2010–11 Women's National Cricket League season. [2]

In 2016, Rolton was inducted into the ICC Cricket Hall of Fame. [14] In January 2018, she was inducted into the Australian Cricket Hall of Fame. [15] A few months later, the South Australian Cricket Association unveiled a new community sporting facility in Adelaide, announcing the name of the main ground as Karen Rolton Oval. [16] [17]

Rolton currently lives in Victoria and remains involved with cricket through her coaching roles at the Melbourne Renegades and also at local level. [18]

Honours

Team

Individual

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References

Notes

  1. 1 2 "Player Profiles: Karen Rolton". Women's Cricket in Australia – Southern Stars. 2 May 2004. Archived from the original on 24 February 2007. Retrieved 11 March 2007.
  2. 1 2 3 4 "Karen Rolton" . ESPNcricinfo . Retrieved 15 December 2006.
  3. 1 2 "Sublime Rolton guides Australia to fifth World Cup | ESPNcricinfo.com". www.espncricinfo.com. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  4. "Australian Cricket Awards | Cricket Australia". www.cricketaustralia.com.au. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  5. "Rolton wins Women's Player of the Year award | ESPNcricinfo.com". www.espncricinfo.com. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  6. "Rolton, Fitzpatrick notch one-day tons". thefanatics.com. 19 October 2006. Archived from the original on 22 September 2007. Retrieved 12 March 2007.
  7. "Rolton pulls stumps on career". www.abc.net.au. 20 January 2010. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  8. "Rolton warns of pressures of a home World Cup". cricket.com.au. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  9. "A great advertisement for women's cricket | ESPNcricinfo.com". www.espncricinfo.com. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  10. "103 off 40 balls, 22 off one over". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 21 July 2017. Retrieved 21 July 2017.
  11. "Records | Women's Twenty20 Internationals | Batting records | Most runs in debut match". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 2 July 2017. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  12. "Twenty20 Match: England Women v Australia Women at Taunton, Sep 2, 2005 | Cricket Scorecard". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 26 May 2017. Retrieved 22 May 2017.
  13. "Karen Rolton retires from international cricket". ESPNcricinfo. 20 January 2010. Retrieved 2 December 2019.
  14. "Karen Rolton inducted into ICC Hall of Fame". ESPNcricinfo. 24 November 2016. Archived from the original on 19 July 2019. Retrieved 19 July 2019.
  15. "Latest Hall of Fame inductees revealed". cricket.com.au. Retrieved 27 May 2020.
  16. "SACA unveils Karen Rolton Oval". South Australian Cricket Association. 8 March 2018. Archived from the original on 13 March 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  17. "The Envy of Australian Cricket". The Advertiser. 7 March 2018. Archived from the original on 15 March 2018. Retrieved 13 March 2018.
  18. "Game changer: Rolton's records leave lasting legacy". cricket.com.au. Retrieved 27 May 2020.

Further reading

Preceded by
New Award
ICC Women's Cricketer of the Year
2006
Succeeded by
Jhulan Goswami