Graham Gooch

Last updated

Graham Gooch's Test career performance graph. Graham Gooch Graph.png
Graham Gooch's Test career performance graph.
Graham Gooch
OBE DL
Graham Gooch 01.jpg
Gooch in 1997
Personal information
Full nameGraham Alan Gooch
Born (1953-07-23) 23 July 1953 (age 69)
Whipps Cross, Essex, England
NicknameZap, [1] Goochie
Height6 ft 0 in (1.83 m)
BattingRight-handed
BowlingRight-arm medium
Role Opening Batsman
International information
National side
Test debut(cap  461)10 July 1975 v  Australia
Last Test3 February 1995 v  Australia
ODI debut(cap  34)26 August 1976 v  West Indies
Last ODI10 January 1995 v  Australia
Domestic team information
YearsTeam
Test Match Career Performance by OppositionBatting [27]
OppositionMatchesRunsAverageHigh Score100 / 50
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia 42263233.311964 / 16
Flag of India.svg India 19172555.643335 / 8
Flag of New Zealand.svg New Zealand 15114852.182104 / 3
Flag of Pakistan.svg Pakistan 1068342.681351 / 5
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg Sri Lanka 337662.661741 / 1
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg West Indies 26219744.83154*5 / 13
Flag of South Africa.svg South Africa 313923.16330 / 0
Overall118890042.5833320 / 46
ODI Career Performance by OppositionBatting [28]
OppositionMatchesRunsAverageHigh Score100 / 50
Flag of Australia (converted).svg Australia 32139546.501364 / 9
Flag of India.svg India 1742026.251151 / 1
Flag of New Zealand.svg New Zealand 1671350.92112*1 / 4
Flag of Pakistan.svg Pakistan 1651732.311421 / 1
Flag of Sri Lanka.svg Sri Lanka 730343.28840 / 4
WestIndiesCricketFlagPre1999.svg West Indies 3288130.37129*1 / 4
Flag of South Africa.svg South Africa 122.0020 / 0
Overall125429036.981428 / 23

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References

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  25. "Gooch battles for hair-loss ad". BBC News. 9 January 2002. Archived from the original on 13 April 2015. Retrieved 13 April 2015.
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  28. "Graham Gooch ODI Matches – Batting Analysis". ESPNcricinfo. Archived from the original on 31 October 2014. Retrieved 29 May 2012.
Sporting positions
Preceded by English national cricket captain
1988
1989–1993
Succeeded by
Preceded by Essex cricket captain
1986–1987
1989–1994
Succeeded by