Ministry of Rites

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Ministry of Rites
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 禮部
Simplified Chinese 礼部
Literal meaning Rites  Ministry
Vietnamese name
Vietnamese alphabet Lễ Bộ
Chữ Hán 禮部
Manchu name
Manchu script ᡩᠣᡵᠣᠯᠣᠨ ᡳ ᠵᡠᡵᡤᠠᠨ
Möllendorff dorolon i jurgan

The Ministry or Board of Rites was one of the Six Ministries of government in late imperial China. It was part of the imperial Chinese government from the Tang (7th century) until the 1911 Xinhai Revolution. Along with religious rituals and court ceremonial the Ministry of Rites also oversaw the imperial examination and China's foreign relations.

Contents

A Ministry of Rites also existed in imperial Vietnam, one of its tasks was enforcing the naming taboo. [1]

History

Under the Han, similar functions were performed by the Ministry of Ceremonies. In early medieval China, its functions were performed by other officials including the Grand Herald. Under the Song (10th-13th centuries), its functions were temporarily transferred to the Zhongshu Sheng. Its administration of China's foreign relations was ended by the establishment of the Zongli Yamen in 1861.

Functions

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References

Citations

  1. François Thierry de Crussol (蒂埃里) (2011). "The Confucian Message on Vietnamese Coins, A closer look at the Nguyễn dynasty's large coins with moral maxims », Numismatic Chronicle, 2011, pp. 367-406". Academia.edu . Retrieved 22 August 2019.

Sources

See also