Museum of Sydney

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Museum of Sydney
Museum of Sydney 2010.jpg
Museum of Sydney from Bridge St
Established1995
LocationCorner of Phillip and Bridge Streets, Sydney
Coordinates 33°51′50″S151°12′41″E / 33.86376°S 151.21128°E / -33.86376; 151.21128 Coordinates: 33°51′50″S151°12′41″E / 33.86376°S 151.21128°E / -33.86376; 151.21128
Website Museum of Sydney

The Museum of Sydney is a historical collection and exhibit, built on the ruins of the house of New South Wales' first Governor, Arthur Phillip, on the present-day corner of Phillip and Bridge Street, Sydney.

Arthur Phillip 18th and 19th-century British naval officer, Governor of New South Wales

Admiral Arthur Phillip was a Royal Navy officer and the first Governor of New South Wales who founded the British penal colony that later became the city of Sydney, Australia.

Phillip Street, Sydney street in Sydney

Phillip Street is a street in the central business district of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. While the street runs from King Street in the south to Circular Quay in the north, the present street is effectively in two sections, separated by Chifley Square. Other cross streets include Martin Place, Bridge Street, and Bent Street. It is the hotspot of Sydney's legal elite.

Bridge Street, Sydney street in Sydney

Bridge Street is a street in the central business district of Sydney in New South Wales, Australia. Bridge Street runs for 500 metres (1,600 ft) in a west–east direction with traffic flowing in both directions. It is situated in the northern portion of the central business district. The western terminus of Bridge Street is at George Street, with the eastern terminus at Macquarie Street, adjacent to the Chief Secretary's Building.

Contents

Description

The original house, which was Australia's first Government House, was built in 1788 and later abandoned. The foundations were exposed by archaeologists in 1983. [1] The new museum building on the site was designed by Denton Corker Marshall architects. [2] The museum was built as part of the Governor Phillip Tower development and is managed by the Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales.

First Government House, Sydney historic national heritage site in Sydney NSW

The First Government House was the first residence for the Governors of New South Wales located at 41 Bridge Street, in the Sydney central business district in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was built from 1788 to 1789 and used until 1845, after which it was demolished in 1846. Some of the site is now occupied by the Museum of Sydney. Its construction was attributed to James Bloodsworth. It is also known as First Government House Site, Museum of Sydney and A Rum Rebellion Site. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 10 December 1999; and on 19 August 2005 the site was listed on the National Heritage List.

Government House, Sydney official residence of the Governor of New South Wales

The Government House is the heritage-listed vice-regal residence of the Governor of New South Wales, Australia, located on Conservatorium Road in the Sydney central business district adjacent to the Royal Botanic Gardens, overlooking Sydney Harbour, just south of the Sydney Opera House. Constructed between 1837 and 1843, the property has been the vice-regal residence of the Governor since Sir George Gipps, except for two brief periods; the first between 1901 and 1914, when the property was leased to the Commonwealth of Australia as the residence of the Governor-General of Australia, and the second from 1996 to 2011.

Denton Corker Marshall is an international architecture practice established in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia in 1972. It was founded by architects John Denton, Bill Corker, and Barrie Marshall. While Melbourne remains the design base, the firm has additional practices in London, Manchester and Jakarta with over 510 projects in 37 different countries.

The Museum of Sydney explores colonial and contemporary Sydney through objects, pictures, and new digital media techniques. Panoramic views of Sydney from 1788 until today stretch across walls and video screens. Sydney's convict era is explored in a giant showcase of goods and chattels recovered from more than 25 archaeological digs.

Sydney City in New South Wales, Australia

Sydney is the state capital of New South Wales and the most populous city in Australia and Oceania. Located on Australia's east coast, the metropolis surrounds Port Jackson and extends about 70 km (43.5 mi) on its periphery towards the Blue Mountains to the west, Hawkesbury to the north, the Royal National Park to the south and Macarthur to the south-west. Sydney is made up of 658 suburbs, 40 local government areas and 15 contiguous regions. Residents of the city are known as "Sydneysiders". As of June 2017, Sydney's estimated metropolitan population was 5,230,330 and is home to approximately 65% of the state's population.

Origins of the name

When it was commissioned, the project was called the First Government House Museum. [3] [4] [5] While the museum building was being built in November 1993, the New South Wales Minister for the Arts announced that the museum would be known as the Museum of Sydney on the Site of First Government House, [6] [7] described in the press at the time as a "mouthful" [6] and commonly contracted to The Museum of Sydney. [3] The change of name attracted protests. [8] [3] [4]

Forecourt

Edge of the Trees, artwork in the museum forecourt, installed in 1995. Entry point 2.jpg
Edge of the Trees, artwork in the museum forecourt, installed in 1995.

The public entrance to the museum is via First Government House Place in Bridge Street, Sydney. [8] The outline of Phillip's residence, the first Government House, is marked out on the plaza with inlaid stone. [6] Excavation of the site revealed examples of covered drains dated to the late 1790s and brick barrel drains dated to circa 1811 and another to circa 1828. The remains of the drains and privies are shown in their original context, along with other archeological artifacts, in glass display cases built into the pavement of the forecourt. [9] [10]

Outhouse Small structure, separate from a main building, which covers a toilets

An outhouse, also known by many other names, is a small structure, separate from a main building, which covers a toilet. This is typically either a pit latrine or a bucket toilet, but other forms of dry (non-flushing) toilets may be encountered. The term may also be used to denote the toilet itself, not just the structure itself.

Display case furniture

A display case is a cabinet with one or often more transparent glass surfaces, used to display objects for viewing. A display case may appear in an exhibition, museum, retail store, restaurant, or house. Often, labels are included with the displayed objects, providing information such as description or prices. In a museum, the displayed cultural artifacts are normally part of the museum's collection, or are part of a temporary exhibition. In retail or a restaurant, the items are normally being offered for sale. A trophy case is used to display sports trophies or other awards.

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Sydney Hospital Hospital in New South Wales, Australia

Sydney Hospital is a major hospital in Australia, located on Macquarie Street in the Sydney central business district. It is the oldest hospital in Australia, dating back to 1788, and has been at its current location since 1811. It first received the name Sydney Hospital in 1881.

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Tank Stream stream in New South Wales, Australia

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Fort Denison Old fort in the Sydney Harbour National Park

Building details

Royal Botanic Garden, Sydney botanic gardens in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

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Sydney Mint building in Sydney

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Sydney Observatory astronomical observatory in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

The Sydney Observatory is a heritage-listed meteorological station, astronomical observatory, function venue, science museum, and education facility located on Observatory Hill at Upper Fort Street, in the inner city Sydney suburb of Millers Point in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by William Weaver (plans) and Alexander Dawson (supervision) and built from 1857 to 1859 by Charles Bingemann & Ebenezer Dewar. It is also known as The Sydney Observatory; Observatory; Fort Phillip; Windmill Hill; and Flagstaff Hill. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 22 December 2000.

Customs House, Sydney historic commonwealth heritage site in Sydney NSW

Customs House, Sydney is a heritage-listed museum space, visitor attraction, commercial building and performance space located in the Circular Quay area at 45 Alfred Street, in the Sydney central business district, in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. The building served as a customs house prior to Federation and then as the head office of New South Wales operations of the Government of Australia agency Department of Trade and Customs until 1988. The customs function relocated to a new site in 1990. The initial designs were by Mortimer Lewis and it was built during 1845 by under the administration of Governor Sir George Gipps. It is also known as Customs House (former) and Site of former Customs House. The site was added to the Commonwealth Heritage List on 22 June 2004; and to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney barracks in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

The Hyde Park Barracks, Sydney is a heritage-listed former barracks, hospital, convict accommodation, mint and courthouse and now museum and cafe located at Macquarie Street in the Sydney central business district, in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. Originally built from 1811 to 1819 as a brick building and compound to house convict men and boys, it was designed by convict architect Francis Greenway. It is also known as the Mint Building and Hyde Park Barracks Group and Rum Hospital; Royal Mint - Sydney Branch; Sydney Infirmary and Dispensary; Queen's Square Courts; Queen's Square. The site is managed by the Sydney Living Museums, an agency of the Government of New South Wales, as a living history museum open to the public.

Alexandra Canal (New South Wales) canal in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

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Dawes Point Battery

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James Semple Kerr was an architectural historian and heritage practitioner in Australia, who was prominent in the drafting of the original Burra Charter and its subsidiary documents, and developing standards for conservation practice, particularly in relation to conservation assessments and management reports such as conservation management plans. Kerr's influence in the conservation movement is most notable for his publication of the Conservation Plan, which has guided building conservation in Australia and around the world.

Justice and Police Museum Living history museum in New South Wales, Australia

The Justice and Police Museum is a heritage-listed former water police station, offices and courthouse and now justice and police museum located at 4-8 Phillip Street on the corner of Albert Street, in the Sydney central business district in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was designed by Edmund Blacket, Alexander Dawson and James Barnet and built from 1854 to 1886. It is also known as Police Station & Law Courts (former) and Traffic Court. The property is owned by the Department of Justice, a department of the Government of New South Wales. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 2 April 1999.

Cleland Bond Store

Cleland Bond Store is a heritage-listed former warehouse and bond store and now department store and shops located at 33 Playfair Street in the inner city Sydney suburb of The Rocks in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was built from 1913 to 1914. It is also known as Cleland Bond Store and Cleland Store. The property is owned by Property NSW, an agency of the Government of New South Wales. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 10 May 2002.

67 Harrington Street, The Rocks

67 Harrington Street, The Rocks is a heritage-listed serviced apartments complex and former terrace house located at 67 Harrington Street, in the inner city Sydney suburb of The Rocks in the City of Sydney local government area of New South Wales, Australia. It was built from 1885. It is also known as Stafford Apartments and 75 Harrington Street; Clocktower Development. The property is owned by Property NSW, an agency of the Government of New South Wales. It was added to the New South Wales State Heritage Register on 10 May 2002.

References

  1. Historic Houses Trust of NSW, retrieved 2009-10-07
  2. AIA Architecture award, retrieved 2009-10-07
  3. 1 2 3 Peter Poland (President, Woollahra History and Heritage Society Inc), "Intellectual Hijacking" (letter to the editor), The Sydney Morning Herald, 1 December 1993, p. 14."Geraldine O'Brien is right when she describes "The Museum of Sydney on the Site of First Government House" as a mouthful (Herald, November 20). The sad thing is that this title will be shortened to "The Museum of Sydney" which will both obscure the real significance of this very important and historic site and totally mislead those who visit the museum. The significance of the First Government House is that it was the powerhouse of the European settlement in this part of the Pacific. On this site decisions were made which not only affected the exploration of and expansion into Australia of the newcomers with all that that meant for both them and the Aborigines but also decisions which reached out to the world from Cape Town to Calcutta, Canton and California and all points in between. To call the museum which should be interpreting the far-reaching significance of this site "The Museum of Sydney" reflects an arrogance that assumes that Sydney is the only place that matters and an act of intellectual hijacking on the part of those who have been given responsibility of what was to be "The First Government House Museum"."
  4. 1 2 Adrian Bain, "Phillip needs filip" (letter to the editor), Daily Telegraph (Sydney), 21 December 2002, p. 32.
  5. Fraser Range Granite NL, "Quarterly Exploration Reports December (Part A)", 27 January 1994, Australian Stock Exchange Company Announcements via factiva accessed 27 August 2011.
  6. 1 2 3 Geraldine O'Brien, "History underfoot in new museum on significant site", The Sydney Morning Herald, 20 November 1993, p. 15
  7. Local Government (General) Amendment (Rate Exemptions) Regulation 2009 (NSW) and reg 123, Local Government (General) Regulation 2005 (NSW).
  8. 1 2 "Column 8", The Sydney Morning Herald, 27 January 1995, p. 1. "IT WAS, perhaps, the most genteel demonstration ever held in Sydney—the holding up of placards by the Friends of the First Government House Site at the opening of First Government House Place in Bridge Street yesterday. The Friends were the first to agitate in the early 1980s to stop the site being covered by an office block. An archaeological survey uncovered the footings of Governor Phillip's house, and after long negotiations, a museum has been built there, to open on March 11. Why are the Friends upset? They had expected their preferred name, First Government House Museum, would be chosen. Instead, the Heritage Houses Trust has called it The Museum of Sydney - so some 50 Friends had their quiet, polite, gentle and heartfelt say when the place was opened."
  9. "Museum of Sydney Guidebook". Sydney Living Museums. Historic Houses Trust of NSW. Retrieved 2014-01-03. Underfloor: The remains of first Government House’s drains and privies are exposed below the floor. Also displayed is a selection of relics, ruins and rubbish from the house retrieved by archaeologists in the 1980s.
  10. Anna Wong, "Colonial Sanitation, Urban Planning and Social Reform in Sydney, New South Wales 1788–1857", (1999) Australasian Historical Archaeology, Vol. 17, pp. 58-69 via JStor accessed 27 August 2011.11:02
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