Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum

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Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum is a species of Mycobacterium . [1]

<i>Mycobacterium</i> genus of bacteria

Mycobacterium is a genus of Actinobacteria, given its own family, the Mycobacteriaceae. Over 190 species are recognized in this genus. This genus includes pathogens known to cause serious diseases in mammals, including tuberculosis and leprosy in humans. The Greek prefix myco- means "fungus," alluding to the way mycobacteria have been observed to grow in a mold-like fashion on the surface of cultures. It is acid fast and cannot be stained by the Gram stain procedure.

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<i>Mycobacterium tuberculosis</i> Species of bacterium

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a species of pathogenic bacteria in the family Mycobacteriaceae and the causative agent of tuberculosis. First discovered in 1882 by Robert Koch, M. tuberculosis has an unusual, waxy coating on its cell surface primarily due to the presence of mycolic acid. This coating makes the cells impervious to Gram staining, and as a result, M. tuberculosis can appear either Gram-negative or Gram-positive. Acid-fast stains such as Ziehl-Neelsen, or fluorescent stains such as auramine are used instead to identify M. tuberculosis with a microscope. The physiology of M. tuberculosis is highly aerobic and requires high levels of oxygen. Primarily a pathogen of the mammalian respiratory system, it infects the lungs. The most frequently used diagnostic methods for tuberculosis are the tuberculin skin test, acid-fast stain, culture, and polymerase chain reaction.

<i>Siphoviridae</i> family of double-stranded DNA viruses

Siphoviridae is a family of double-stranded DNA viruses in the order Caudovirales. Bacteria and archaea serve as natural hosts. There are currently 313 species in this family, divided among 47 genera. The characteristic structural features of this family are a nonenveloped head and noncontractile tail.

The Runyon classification of nontuberculous mycobacteria based on the rate of growth, production of yellow pigment and whether this pigment was produced in the dark or only after exposure to light.

Mycobacterium bolletii is a bacterial species of the phylum Actinobacteria and the genus Mycobacterium. It was named in honor of Claude Bollet, a famous clinical microbiologist and taxonomist.

Mycobacterium caprae is a species of bacteria in the genus Mycobacterium and a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Prior to 2003, the species was referred to as Mycobacterium tuberculosis subsp. caprae. It is also synonymous with the name Mycobacterium bovis subsp. caprae.

Mycobacterium celatum is a species of the phylum Actinobacteria, belonging to the genus Mycobacterium.

Mycobacterium chubuense is a species of the phylum Actinobacteria, belonging to the genus Mycobacterium.

Mycobacterium diernhoferi is a species of the phylum Actinobacteria, belonging to the genus Mycobacterium.

Mycobacterium gordonae is a species of Mycobacterium named for Ruth E. Gordon. It is a species of the phylum actinobacteria, belonging to the genus Mycobacterium.

Mycobacterium houstonense is a member of the Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex. The specific epithet houstonense refers to Houston, Texas, where the first isolate of the M. fortuitum third biovariant (sorbitol-positive) was identified.

Mycobacterium avium complex is a group of mycobacteria comprising Mycobacterium intracellulare and Mycobacterium avium that are commonly grouped together because they infect humans together; this group, in turn, is part of the group of nontuberculous mycobacteria. These bacteria cause disease in humans called Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection or Mycobacterium avium complex infection.

Mycobacterium neworleansense is a member of the Mycobacterium fortuitum third biovariant complex.

Mycobacteria that form colonies clearly visible to the naked eye in more than 7 days on subculture are termed slow growers.

Rapid growing mycobacterium consists of organism of the Mycobacterium fortuitum group and Mycobacterium chelonae/Mycobacterium abscessus group and these usually cause subcutaneous abscesses or cellulitis following trauma in immunocompetent patients.

The Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex is a genetically related group of Mycobacterium species that can cause tuberculosis in humans or other animals.

Mycobacterium triplex is a species of Mycobacterium.

Mycobacterium senegalense is a species of Mycobacterium.

Mycobacterium rhodesiae is a species of Mycobacterium.

Mycobacterium arosiense is a newly described species of Mycobacterium. It is a scotochromogen that derives its name from Arosia, the Latin name for the city of Aarhus (Denmark), where the strain was first isolated.

References

  1. "Molecular characterization of a novel fastidious mycobacterium causing lepromatous lesions of the skin, subcutis, cornea, and conjunctiva of cats living in Victoria, Australia". J Clin Microbiol. 46 (2): 618–26. Feb 2008. doi:10.1128/JCM.01186-07. PMC   2238134 . PMID   18057130.