Political party strength in Oklahoma

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The following table indicates the party of elected officials in the U.S. state of Oklahoma:

U.S. state constituent political entity of the United States

In the United States, a state is a constituent political entity, of which there are currently 50. Bound together in a political union, each state holds governmental jurisdiction over a separate and defined geographic territory and shares its sovereignty with the federal government. Due to this shared sovereignty, Americans are citizens both of the federal republic and of the state in which they reside. State citizenship and residency are flexible, and no government approval is required to move between states, except for persons restricted by certain types of court orders. Four states use the term commonwealth rather than state in their full official names.

Oklahoma State of the United States of America

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the fifty United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which dramatically increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma

The Lieutenant Governor of Oklahoma is the second-highest executive official of the state government of Oklahoma. As first in the gubernatorial line of succession, the lieutenant governor becomes the new governor of Oklahoma upon the death, resignation, or removal of the governor. The lieutenant governor also serves as the president of the Oklahoma Senate, and may cast a vote to break ties in that chamber.

Oklahoma Secretary of State

The Secretary of State of the State of Oklahoma is the chief clerical officer of Oklahoma and a member of the Oklahoma Governor's Cabinet. The Secretary of State is the only appointed constitutional member of the executive branch of the Oklahoma state government. The office of Secretary of State was elective from statehood until 1975 when the Constitution was amended and it became an appointive office, running concurrent with the Governor effective in 1979.

Attorney General of Oklahoma attorney general for the U.S. state of Oklahoma

The Attorney General of Oklahoma is the State Attorney General for the state of Oklahoma. The attorney general serves as the chief legal and law enforcement officer of the State of Oklahoma. As head of the Office of the Oklahoma Attorney General, he or she is responsible for providing legal advice to the other departments and agencies of the executive branch, legislative branch and judicial branch of the state government. The attorney general is also responsible for the prosecution of offenses to Oklahoma law and advocate for the basic legal rights of Oklahoma residents.

The table also indicates the historical party composition in the:

Oklahoma Senate upper state chamber of a state of the United-States of America

The Oklahoma Senate is the upper house of the two houses of the Legislature of Oklahoma, the other being the Oklahoma House of Representatives. The total number of senators is set at 48 by the Oklahoma Constitution.

Oklahoma House of Representatives lower house of U.S. state legislature

The Oklahoma House of Representatives is the lower house of the legislature of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Its members introduce and vote on bills and resolutions, provide legislative oversight for state agencies, and help to craft the state's budget. The upper house of the Oklahoma Legislature is the Oklahoma Senate.

Oklahoma Corporation Commission

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is the public utilities commission of the U.S state of Oklahoma run by three statewide elected commissioners. Authorized to employ more than 400 employees, it regulates oil and gas drilling, utilities and telephone companies.

For years in which a presidential election was held, the table indicates which party's nominees received the state's electoral votes.

The parties are as follows:    Democratic (D),    Republican (R), and   a tie or coalition within a group of elected officials.

Democratic Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Democratic Party is one of the two major contemporary political parties in the United States, along with the Republican Party. Tracing its heritage back to Thomas Jefferson and James Madison's Democratic-Republican Party, the modern-day Democratic Party was founded around 1828 by supporters of Andrew Jackson, making it the world's oldest active political party.

Republican Party (United States) Major political party in the United States

The Republican Party, also referred to as the GOP, is one of the two major political parties in the United States; the other is its historic rival, the Democratic Party.

YearExecutive offices State Legislature Corp. Comm. United States Congress Electoral College votes
Governor Lt. Governor Sec. of State Attorney General AuditorExaminer and Inspector Treasurer Supt. of Pub. Inst. Comm. of Labor Comm. of Ins. State Senate State House U.S. Senator (Class II) U.S. Senator (Class III) U.S. House
Auditor and Inspector
1907 Charles N. Haskell (D) [1] George W. Bellamy (D) Bill Cross (D) [2] Charles West (D) Martin E. Trapp (D) Charles A. Taylor (D) [2] J. A. Menefee (D) E. D. Cameron (D) C. L. Daugherty (D) T. J. McCombs (D) [3] 39D, 5R92D, 17R3D Robert L. Owen (D) Thomas Gore (D)4D, 1R
1908 Bryan/Kern (D)

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190934D, 10R68D, 41R3R, 2D
1910 Thomas Smith (D) [4] Milas Lasater (D) [4]
1911 Lee Cruce (D) J. J. McAlester (D) B. F. Harrison (D) [3] Leo Meyers (D) Robert Dunlop (D) R. H. Wilson (D) P. A. Ballard (D) [3] 31D, 13R82D, 27R3D, 2R
1912 Fred Parkinson (D) [4] Wilson/Marshall (D)

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1913 Joseph C. McClelland (D) A. L. Welch (D) [3] [4] 36D, 8R80D, 18R3D, 2R; 3D At-large
1914
1915 R. L. Williams (D)Martin E. Trapp (D) S. L. Lyon (D) [5] S. P. Freeling (D) E. B. Howard (D) W. L. Alexander (D) W. G. Ashton (D) [3] 38D, 5R, 1 Soc.75D, 17R, 5 Soc.7D, 1R
1916
191785D, 26R6D, 2R
1918 Claude Connally (D) [4]
1919 James B. A. Robertson (D) Joe Morris (D) Frank C. Carter (D) A. N. Leecraft (D)34D, 10R74D, 30R
1920 E. W. Hardon (D) [3] [4] Harding/Coolidge (R)

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192127D, 17R55R, 47D2D, 1R John W. Harreld (R)5R, 3D
1922
1923 Jack C. Walton (D) R. A. Sneed (D) George Short (D) C. C. Childers (D) George J. Mechling (D) A. S. J. Shaw (D) M. A. Nash (D) [3] 32D, 12R93D, 14R7D, 1R
1924Martin E. Trapp (D)vacant Jess G. Read (D) [2] [4] Davis/Bryan (D)

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192538D, 6R81D, 27R William B. Pine (R)6D, 2R
1926
1927 Henry S. Johnston (D) William J. Holloway (D) Graves Leeper (D) Ed Dabney (D) A. S. J. Shaw (D) John Rogers (D) [2] R. A. Sneed (D) John S. Vaughan (D) [3] [4] W. A. Pat Murphy (D)35D, 9R87D, 21R3D Elmer Thomas (D)7D, 1R
1928 Hoover/Curtis (R)

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1929William J. Holloway (D)vacant32D, 12R56D, 47R2D, 1R5D, 3R
1930
1931 William H. Murray (D) Robert Burns (D) R. A. Sneed (D) J. Berry King (D) Frank C. Carter (D) Ray Weems (D)88D, 9R Thomas Gore (D)7D, 1R
1932 Roosevelt/Garner (D)

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193339D, 5R113D, 4R, 1I8D; 1D At-large
1934
1935 Ernest W. Marland (D) James E. Berry (D) Frank C. Carter (D) Mac Q. Williamson (D) C. C. Childers (D) Hubert L. Bolen (D) [4] [6] 43D, 1R112D, 7R, 1I3D
1936
1937 A. L. Crable (D) [4] 44D114D, 3R Joshua B. Lee (D)
1938
1939 Leon C. Phillips (D) C. C. Childers (D) Frank C. Carter (D) Carl B. Sebring (D)43D, 1R102D, 13R
1940 Roosevelt/Wallace (D)

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194142D, 2R114D, 7R7D, 1R; 1D At-large
1942
1943 Robert S. Kerr (D) Frank C. Carter (D) [3] Randell S. Cobb (D) C. C. Childers (D) A. S. J. Shaw (D)40D, 4R93D, 24R Edward H. Moore (R)7D, 1R
1944 Roosevelt/Truman (D)

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194538D, 6R98D, 22R6D, 2R
1946 Katherine Manton (D) [4] Mac Q. Williamson (D) Charles G. Morris (D) [2] [4]
1947 Roy J. Turner (D) Wilburn Cartwright (D) A. S. J. Shaw (D) John D. Conner (D) Oliver Hodge (D) Jim Hughes (D) Donald F. Dickey (D) [4] 37D, 7R95D, 23R
1948 Truman/Barkley (D)

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194939D, 5R103D, 12R Robert S. Kerr (D)8D
1950
1951 Johnston Murray (D) John D. Conner (D)Wilburn Cartwright (D) A. S. J. Shaw (D)41D, 3R99D, 19R Mike Monroney (D)6D, 2R
1952 Eisenhower/Nixon (R)

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195338D, 6R104D, 20R5D, 1R
1954 Scott Burson (D) [4]
1955 Raymond D. Gary (D) Cowboy Pink Williams (D) Andy Anderson (D) A. S. J. Shaw (D) John D. Conner (D) Joe B. Hunt (D)39D, 5R102D, 19R
1956
195741D, 3R101D, 20R
1958
1959 J. Howard Edmondson (D) George Nigh (D) John D. Conner (D) [2] Andy Anderson (D) John M. Rogers (D) William A. Burkhart (D)110D, 9R
1960 William N. Christian (D) [4] Nixon/Lodge (R)

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196140D, 4R107D, 14R
1962
1963George Nigh (D)vacant James M. Bullard (D) Charles R. Nesbitt (D) A. F. Shaw (D) Cowboy Pink Williams (D) W. T. Hughes (D)38D, 6R96D, 24RJ. Howard Edmondson (D)
Henry Bellmon (R) Leo Winters (D)
1964 Johnson/Humphrey (D)

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196541D, 7R78D, 21R Fred Roy Harris (D)4D, 2R
1966
1967 Dewey F. Bartlett (R)George Nigh (D) John Rogers (D) [3] G. T. Blankenship (R) Joe Bailey Cobb (D) [3] Leo Winters (D) L. E. Bailey (R)39D, 9R74D, 25R
1968 Nixon/Agnew (R)

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196938D, 10R76D, 23R Henry Bellmon (R)
1970
1971 David Hall (D) Larry Derryberry (D) Leslie Fisher (D) [3] Wilbur Wright (D) [3] 39D, 9R78D, 21R
1972
1973 L. P. Williams (D)38D, 10R75D, 26RDewey F. Bartlett (R)5D, 1R
1974
1975 David Boren (D) Wilbur Wright (D) [3] 39D, 9R76D, 25R
1976appointed position [7] William E. Foster (D) [4] [8] Ford/Dole (R)

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197778D, 23R
1978 Ray Parr (D) [4]
1979George Nigh (D) Spencer Bernard (D) Jan Eric Cartwright (D) Tom Daxon (R) William R. Paulk (D) [4] Gerald Grimes (D) [3] 75D, 26RDavid L. Boren (D)
1980 Reagan/Bush (R)

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198137D, 11R73D, 28R Don Nickles (R)
1982
1983 Mike Turpen (D) Clifton Scott (D)34D, 14R76D, 25R
1984
1985 John Folks (D) [3] [4] 70D, 31R
1986
1987 Henry Bellmon (R) Robert S. Kerr III (D) Robert Harlan Henry (D) Ellis Edwards (D) Dean Calhoon (R) [4] 31D, 17R4D, 2R
1988 Bush/Quayle (R)

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1989 Gerald E. Hoeltzel (R) [4] 33D, 15R69D, 32R2D, 1R
1990 Ira Phillips (R) [4]
1991 David Walters (D) Jack Mildren (D) Susan B. Loving (D) Claudette Henry (R) Sandy Garrett (D) Dave Renfro (D) [9] 37D, 11R2R, 1D
1992 Cathy Weatherford (D) [4] Bush/Quayle (R)

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199368D, 33R
1994
Jim Inhofe (R) [10] 3R, 3D [11]
1995 Frank Keating (R) Mary Fallin (R) Drew Edmondson (D) Robert Butkin (D) [3] Brenda Reneau (R) John P. Crawford (R)35D, 13R65D, 36R5R, 1D
1996 Dole/Kemp (R)

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199733D, 15R3R [12] 6R
1998
1999 Carroll Fisher [3] 61D, 40R
2000 Bush/Cheney (R)

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200130D, 18R53D, 48R5R, 1D
2002
2003 Brad Henry (D) Jeff McMahan (D) [3] 28D, 20R4R, 1D
2004
200526D, 22R57R, 44D Tom Coburn (R)
Scott Meacham (D) [4] Kim Holland (D) [4]
200625D, 23R [13]
26D, 22R [14]
2007 Jari Askins (D) Lloyd Fields (D)24D, 24R2R, 1D [15]
2008 McCain/Palin (R)

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Steve Burrage (D) [4]
200926R, 22D61R, 40D3R
201062R, 39D [16]
2011 Mary Fallin (R) Todd Lamb (R) Scott Pruitt (R) [17] Gary Jones (R) Ken Miller (R) Janet Barresi (R) Mark Costello (R) John D. Doak (R)32R, 16D70R, 31D
201267R, 31D, 3 vac. Romney/Ryan (R)

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201336R, 12D72R, 29D5R
2014
2015 Joy Hofmeister (R)40R, 8D James Lankford (R)
2016 Melissa McLawhorn Houston (R)39R, 9D [18] 71R, 30D [19] Trump/Pence (R)

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2017 Mike Hunter (R) [20] 42R, 6D75R, 26D
2018
2019 Kevin Stitt (R) Matt Pinnell (R) Cindy Byrd (R) Randy McDaniel (R) Leslie Osborn (R) Glen Mulready (R)39R, 9D76R, 25D4R, 1D
Year Governor Lt. Governor Sec. of State Attorney General AuditorExaminer and Inspector Treasurer Supt. of Pub. Inst. Comm. of Labor Comm. of Ins. State Senate State House Corp. Comm. U.S. Senator (Class II) U.S. Senator (Class III) U.S. House Electoral College votes
Auditor and Inspector
Executive offices State Legislature United States Congress

See also

Politics of Oklahoma

The politics of Oklahoma exists in a framework of a presidential republic modeled after the United States. The governor of Oklahoma is both head of state and head of government, and of a pluriform two-party system. Executive power is exercised by the governor and the government. Legislative power is vested in the governor and the bicameral Oklahoma Legislature. Judicial power is vested in the judiciary of Oklahoma. The political system is laid out in the 1907 Oklahoma Constitution.

Elections in Oklahoma

Elections in the State of Oklahoma are established by the Oklahoma Constitution in Section 1 of Article 3. They are governed by the Oklahoma State Election Board.

Government of Oklahoma

The government of the U.S. State of Oklahoma, established by the Oklahoma Constitution, is a republican democracy modeled after the federal government of the United States. The state government has three branches: the executive, legislative, and judicial. Through a system of separation of powers or "checks and balances," each of these branches has some authority to act on its own, some authority to regulate the other two branches, and has some of its own authority, in turn, regulated by the other branches.

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References

  1. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory joined the Union as the State of Oklahoma on November 16, 1907.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Died.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 Resigned.
  4. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 Appointed by governor to fill vacancy.
  5. Before Lyon's swearing-in on January 11, B.F. Harrison resigned on January 2, and H. G. Oliver was appointed for the nine-day interim.
  6. A Democrat, Hugh L. Harrell, won the Treasurer’s race in 1934, but resigned after just a few weeks into his term to become President of the Wichita Land Bank, leading to Bolen’s appointment.
  7. After an amendment was passed in 1975, the office was to no longer be elected but, rather, appointed by the Governor. This was to go into effect in 1979, but due to John Roger's early resignation, the amendment de facto went into effect early.
  8. Office became an appointed position by the Governor.
  9. Office became an elected statewide position again.
  10. Elected in special election in November 1994 to succeed Boren.
  11. Frank Lucas won a special election in May to succeed Glenn English.
  12. Corporation Commissioner Cody L. Graves (D) resigned; Denise Bode (R) was appointed by Gov. Keating to replace Graves.
  13. A Republican, Mike Schulz, won a special election in May in District 38 to succeed Democrat Robert M. Kerr, flipping the seat.
  14. Nancy Riley of District 37 switched parties from Republican to Democrat in August after losing the Lt. Gubernatorial primary.
  15. Corporation Commissioner Denise Bode (R) resigned; Jim Roth (D) was appointed by Gov. Henry to replace Bode.
  16. A Republican, Todd Russ, won a special election to succeed a Democrat, Ryan McMullen, who resigned to take an appointment in the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
  17. "Trump to tap Oklahoma attorney general to lead EPA: transition team". Reuters. December 7, 2016.
  18. A Democrat, J.J. Dossett, won a special election vacated after Rick Brinkley, a Republican, resigned his seat after being charged with embezzlement from the Better Business Bureau.
  19. A Democrat, Cyndi Munson, won a special election after David Dank, the Republican incumbent, died.
  20. Appointed to replace Pruitt. Kara Rodriguez (R) was acting Attorney General from February 17-20.