Satoko Miyahara

Last updated

Satoko Miyahara
Satoko Miyahara 2017.jpg
Miyahara at the 2017 Skate America
Personal information
Native name宮原 知子
Country represented Flag of Japan.svg Japan
Born (1998-03-26) 26 March 1998 (age 21)
Kyoto, Japan
Home town Kyoto, Japan
Height1.52 m (5 ft 0 in)
Coach Mie Hamada
Lee Barkell
Yamato Tamura
Cathy Reed
Haruko Okamoto
Former coachYoko Niino
Choreographer Tom Dickson
Lori Nichol
Former choreographer Jeffrey Buttle
Stéphane Lambiel
Lori Bonviverel
Kenji Miyamoto
Skating club Kansai University SC
Training locations Toronto, Ontario
Takatsuki, Osaka
Began skating2002
World standing 3(As of February 18, 2020) ( 2019-20 ) [1]
2 ( 2018–19 ) [2]
3 ( 2017–18 )
2 ( 2016–17 )
1 ( 2015–16 )
4 ( 2014–15 )
20 ( 2013–14 )
35 ( 2012–13 )
60 ( 2011–12 )
Season's bests 12(As of February 18, 2020) ( 2019-20 ) [3]
10 ( 2018-19 ) [4]
5 ( 2017-18 ) [5]
2 ( 2016-17 ) [6]
3 ( 2015-16 ) [7]
4 ( 2014-15 ) [8]
13 ( 2013-14 ) [9]
23 ( 2012-13 ) [10]
20 ( 2012-12 ) [11]
ISU personal best scores
Combined total219.71
2018 Skate America
Short program76.08
2018 NHK Trophy
Free skate145.85
2018 Skate America

Satoko Miyahara (宮原 知子, Miyahara Satoko, born March 26, 1998) is a Japanese figure skater. She is the 2015 World silver medalist, the 2018 World bronze medalist, the 2016 Four Continents champion, a two-time Four Continents silver medalist (2014, 2015), a two-time Grand Prix Final silver medalist (2015, 2016), a two-time Skate America champion (2017, 2018), a four-time CS U.S. Classic champion (2015, 2016, 2018, 2019), and a four-time Japanese national champion (2015-2018).

Contents

On the junior level, she is the 2012 JGP U.S. champion, the 2011 JGP Poland silver medalist, the 2012 Asian Figure Skating Trophy champion, and a two-time Japanese junior national champion (2012, 2013).

She placed 4th at the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Personal life

Miyahara was born on March 26, 1998 in Kyoto, Japan. [12] Her parents are both doctors. Due to her parents' work, she moved with her family to Houston, Texas when she was five years old and had returned to Kyoto by the age of seven. [13] Miyahara learned English during her time in the United States. [14]

On February 13, 2016, Miyahara graduated from Kansai University High School. She has stated her plans to attend Kansai University and major in literature as well as continuing to study English. [15]

Standing five feet tall, she is known to her fan base as "The Tiny Queen".

Career

Miyahara began skating while she was living in the United States and came under the guidance of Mie Hamada in Kyoto, Japan at the age of seven. [13]

2011–2012 season: Junior international debut

Miyahara became eligible for junior international competition in the 2011–2012 season. She won a silver medal at her Junior Grand Prix debut in Gdańsk, Poland, and finished fifth at her second event in Milan, Italy. Miyahara then won the Japan junior title and placed sixth on the senior level. She was fourth at her first World Junior Championships.

2012–2013 season: First senior national podium

In the 2012–2013 season, Miyahara won gold and bronze medals at her JGP events in the United States and Turkey, respectively. Miyahara then won the 2012 Japanese Junior Championships, before placing fifth at the JGP Final in Sochi, Russia.

Miyahara won her first senior national medal, a bronze, at the Japanese Championships, finishing ahead of Akiko Suzuki. She ended her season at the 2013 World Junior Championships where she finished seventh.

2013–2014 season: Senior international debut

Miyahara started the 2013–2014 season by winning the Asian Trophy. Debuting on the senior Grand Prix, she finished fifth at the 2013 NHK Trophy, having placed sixth in the short program and fifth in the free skate. At the 2013 Rostelecom Cup, she was sixth in the short program, sixth in the free skate, and fifth overall.

At the Japanese Championships, Miyahara placed fourth in the short, fifth in the free, and fourth overall, behind Akiko Suzuki, Kanako Murakami, and Mao Asada. She was selected to compete at the 2014 Four Continents Championships, where she won the silver medal behind teammate Kanako Murakami after placing fourth in the short and second in the free.

Miyahara finished fourth at the 2014 World Junior Championships — less than a point out of third. She ended her season with a gold medal at the Gardena Spring Trophy.

2014–2015 season: World silver medalist

Miyahara attended a training camp during the summer of 2014 to work with Olympic champion Ilia Kulik on her jumps.[ citation needed ] She opened the 2014–2015 season with a win at the Lombardia Trophy. Competing in the Grand Prix series, she took bronze at the 2014 Skate Canada International after placing fourth in the short program and third in the free skate. She won another bronze medal at 2014 NHK Trophy (fourth in SP, second in FS). With these results, Miyahara was the second alternate for the Grand Prix Final.

At the Japanese Championships, Miyahara placed second in the short and first in the free on her way to her first senior national title. At the 2015 Four Continents Championships, she won silver for the second year in a row, having won the short program and placed second in the free.

Miyahara (left) with Elizaveta Tuktamysheva (center) and Elena Radionova (right) at the 2015 World Championships podium 2015 World Championships Ladies Podium.jpg
Miyahara (left) with Elizaveta Tuktamysheva (center) and Elena Radionova (right) at the 2015 World Championships podium

Miyahara ranked third in the short, fourth in the free skate, and second overall at the 2015 World Championships, with personal bests in all competition segments. She was awarded the silver medal behind Elizaveta Tuktamysheva. At the 2015 World Team Trophy, she placed fifth individually and third as part of team Japan.

2015–2016 season: Four Continents champion and Grand Prix Final silver

In the summer of 2015, Miyahara traveled to southern California to work with Ilia Kulik for the second year in a row, aiming to add more power to her jumps. [16] She opened her season on the Challenger Series, winning the 2015 U.S. Classic. Turning to the Grand Prix series, she took bronze at the 2015 Skate America before winning gold at the 2015 NHK Trophy, defeating three-time World Champion Mao Asada. These results qualified Miyahara for her first senior Grand Prix Final.

She won the silver medal at the event in Barcelona after placing fourth in the short program and second in the free skate with personal bests in the free skate and combined total. [17]

Miyahara (center) with Mirai Nagasu (left) and Rika Hongo (right) at the 2016 Four Continents Championships podium Four Continents Championships 2016 - Ladies.jpg
Miyahara (center) with Mirai Nagasu (left) and Rika Hongo (right) at the 2016 Four Continents Championships podium

After repeating as the Japanese national champion, Miyahara went on to win gold at the 2016 Four Continents, achieving personal bests in every portion of the competition. [18] She finished fifth at the 2016 World Championships in Boston, the only event of the season where she finished off the podium.

2016–2017 season: Second Grand Prix Final silver

Miyahara opened her season with a gold medal at the 2016 CS U.S. Classic. Turning to the Grand Prix series, she won the bronze medal at the 2016 Skate Canada International, behind Evgenia Medvedeva and Kaetlyn Osmond, and then silver at the 2016 NHK Trophy, behind Anna Pogorilaya.

Miyahara (left) with Evgenia Medvedeva (center) and Anna Pogorilaya (right) at the 2016-17 Grand Prix Final podium 2016 Grand Prix Final Ladies Seniors.jpg
Miyahara (left) with Evgenia Medvedeva (center) and Anna Pogorilaya (right) at the 2016–17 Grand Prix Final podium

In December, she was awarded the silver medal at the Grand Prix Final in Marseille, being outscored only by Medvedeva. Later that month, she defeated Wakaba Higuchi and Mai Mihara at the Japan Championships to win her third national title. [19]

Due to a stress fracture in her left pelvic girdle, Miyahara withdrew from two February competitions, the 2017 Four Continents Championships and the 2017 Asian Winter Games. [20] [21] To focus on recovery she also decided to withdraw from the 2017 World Championships. [22] The hip injury was attributed to low bone density. [23]

2017–2018 season: Olympic season

Miyahara injured her left foot in July and was diagnosed with inflammation in her right hip in September. [21] [23] She resumed jumping in October. [23] At the 2017 NHK Trophy she finished 5th after underrotating jumps in both nights, but rallied three weeks later to win gold at the 2017 Skate America. [24] She was the first alternate for the 2017-2018 Grand Prix Final in Nagoya, but got promoted and competed in the Final after 2016 champion Evgenia Medvedeva withdrew due to injury. At the Grand Prix Final, she finished third in the short program and fourth in the free skate, finishing fifth overall after lower ranked skaters in the short program performed stronger free skates. Miyahara, while competing well, underrotated two of her jumps in the free skate, also contributing to a lower result.

At the 2017 Japan Championships, Miyahara was crowned the national champion for the fourth time after placing second in the short program and first in the free skate. [25] On December 24, 2017, she was selected to represent Japan at the 2018 Four Continents Championships in Taipei, the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, and 2018 World Championships in Milan, Italy. [26]

In Taipei, Miyahara was first after the short program, third after the free and won the bronze medal overall, behind teammates Kaori Sakamoto and Mai Mihara, contributing to a Japanese sweep of the podium. [27]

Miyahara (right) with Wakaba Higuchi (left) and Kaetlyn Osmond (center) at the 2018 World Championships podium Photos - World Championships 2018 - Ladies (Medalists) (5).jpg
Miyahara (right) with Wakaba Higuchi (left) and Kaetlyn Osmond (center) at the 2018 World Championships podium

At the Olympics, Miyahara was assigned to participate in the ladies' short program in the Team Event, with her teammate Kaori Sakamoto chosen to compete in the free skating. She scored 68.95 points, which was the fourth result that night. Team Japan finished fifth overall. [28] In the individual event, Miyahara scored new personal bests with clean performances, placing fourth in both segments of the competition and overall. [29] [30]

At the World Championships, Miyahara was in third after the short program, with a score of 74.36 after underrotating a triple toe loop in her jump combination. [31] In the free skating, she placed third again with a score of 135.72 after making several mistakes on her jumps. She took bronze overall, behind Kaetlyn Osmond (gold) and teammate Wakaba Higuchi (silver). [32]

2018–2019 season

In preparation for the season, Miyahara worked with a new strength trainer and focused especially on strengthening her hamstrings. Competing first at the 2018 U.S. Classic, she won gold. She went on to win the 2018 Skate America event, placing first in both segments. [33] At her second Grand Prix event, the 2018 NHK Trophy, Miyahara placed second in both programs, narrowly winning the silver medal ahead of Elizaveta Tuktamysheva and behind compatriot Rika Kihira. In the short program, she set a new personal best. She received two underrotation calls in the free skate, and remarked "I was very nervous in my long program. I am disappointed, but I know that I will try harder, so I do better in the future." [34] Her results qualified her for the 2018–19 Grand Prix Final, where she finished sixth, following a combination error in the short program and several underrotated jumps in the free skate. Miyahara deemed it a "frustrating competition", but "I think it will be helpful for the future." [35]

At the 2018 Japan Championships, Miyahara won the short program, slightly more than a point ahead of Sakamoto. Several errors lead to her placing fourth in the free skate, dropping to the bronze medal position overall behind Sakamoto and Kihira. She was named to the Japanese team for the 2019 World Championships in Saitama. [36] Miyahara placed eighth in the short program at the World Championships, after underrotating the second part of her jump combination. [37] She rose to sixth place in the free skate after making only one minor error. Miyahara deemed the season as a whole "mentally one of the toughest seasons", and felt she "had more disappointing competitions over good ones", but that the final event was a strong one. [38]

2019–2020 season

On September 18, 2018, Miyahara's representatives announced that she had moved her primary training base to the Granite Club in Toronto, and was adding Lee Barkell as a coach, though she would continue to be coached by Mie Hamada as well. Miyahara stated that her main goal was to perform a triple Axel in competition. [39] She would later say "to grow up, I chose to go to Toronto." [40]

She began her season at 2019 Japan Open, where she placed fourth with a score of 134.94 points, contributing to Team Japan's silver medal. At 2019 U.S. Classic, she placed first in the short program with 74.16 points and second in the free skate with 130.14 points, once again winning the gold medal at the event. [40]

At her first Grand Prix event, the 2019 Cup of China, she placed second in the short program despite two underrotations. [41] She was third in the free skate, with three jump underrotations, but remained in second place overall, taking the silver medal. [42] Competing the following week at the 2019 Rostelecom Cup, Miyahara placed sixth in the short program after doubling a planned triple Lutz and managing only a triple-double jump combination. [43] She moved from sixth to fourth place in the free skate despite five of her jumps being called underrotated. [44]

Miyahara placed second in the short program at the 2019–20 Japanese Championships after underrotating the second part of her jump combination. [45] She was sixth in the free skate after falling once and underrotating or downgrading eight jumps, and dropped to fourth place overall, her first time finishing off the podium at her national championships since 2013. [46] Disappointed, she commented "I was really good at practice, but I could not control myself tonight, especially in the second half." [47]

Programs

Miyahara at the 2016-17 Grand Prix Final 2016-2017 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final Satoko Miyahara IMG 3965.jpg
Miyahara at the 2016–17 Grand Prix Final
Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2019–2020
[48]
  • Yalla
    by ZwiReK
  • Tabla & Percussion Solo
    performed by Bashir Abdel Aal
  • Egyptian Disco (Buddha Bar edit)
    by David Visan
    choreo. by Benoit Richaud
2018–2019
[49]
2017–2018
[50] [51]

2016–2017
[54]

2015–2016
[12] [57] [58]

2014–2015
[60]

2013–2014
[62]
2012–2013
[63] [64]


  • Voice of Spring Waltz
    by Johann Strauss II
2011–2012
[65]

Competitive highlights

2011–12 to present

International [66]
Event 11–12 12–13 13–14 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19 19–20
Olympics 4th
Worlds 2nd5thWD3rd6th
Four Continents 2nd2nd1stWD3rd
GP Final 2nd2nd5th6th
GP Cup of China 2nd
GP NHK Trophy 5th3rd1st2nd5th2nd
GP Rostelecom 5th4th
GP Skate America 3rd1st1st
GP Skate Canada 3rd3rd
CS Lombardia 1st
CS U.S. Classic 1st1st1st1st
Asian Games WD
Asian Open 1st
Bavarian Open 1st1st
Gardena Trophy 1st
International: Junior [66]
Junior Worlds 4th7th4th
JGP Final 5th
JGP Italy 5th
JGP Poland 2nd
JGP Turkey 3rd
JGP U.S. 1st
Asian Trophy 1st
National [67]
Japan 6th3rd4th1st1st1st1st3rd4th
Japan Junior 1st1st
Team events
Olympics 5th T
4th P
World Team
Trophy
3rd T
5th P
Team Challenge
Cup
3rd T
2nd P
Japan Open 3rd T
2nd P
1st T
2nd P
1st T
2nd P
1st T
3rd P
2nd T
4th P
J = Junior level; TBD = Assigned; WD = Withdrew
T = Team result; P = Personal result. Medals awarded for team result only.

2007–08 to 2010–11

International [66]
Event2007–08 2009–10 2010–11
Asian Trophy 1st N
Triglav Trophy 2nd N [68] 2nd N
Challenge Cup 2nd D [69]
National [67]
Japan Junior Champ. 4th4th
Japan Novice Champ.4th
Levels: D = Debs; N = Novice

Detailed results

Senior level

Miyahara at the 2018 Winter Olympics MIYAHARA Satoko JPN - 4th Place (2).jpg
Miyahara at the 2018 Winter Olympics
Miyahara at the 2015-16 Grand Prix Final podium 2015 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final ladies singles medal ceremonies IMG 9498.JPG
Miyahara at the 2015–16 Grand Prix Final podium
Miyahara at the 2015-16 Grand Prix Final 2015 Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final Satoko Miyahara IMG 9316.JPG
Miyahara at the 2015–16 Grand Prix Final
Miyahara at the 2015 World Championships podium World Championships 2015 - Ladies (Satoko MIYAHARA JPN - Silver Medal).jpg
Miyahara at the 2015 World Championships podium

Small medals for short program and free skating awarded only at ISU Championships. At team events, medals awarded for team results only. ISU personal best highlighted in bold.

2019–20 season
DateEvent SP FS Total
March 16 – 22, 2020 2020 World Championships


February 3–9, 20202020 Bavarian Open 1
66.11
1
125.91
1
192.61
December 18-22, 2019 2019–20 Japan Championships 2
70.11
6
121.32
4
191.43
15–17 November 2019 2019 Rostelecom Cup 6
63.09
4
129.33
4
192.42
8–10 November 2019 2019 Cup of China 2
68.91
3
142.27
2
211.18
5 October 20192019 Japan Open 4
134.94
2T
September 17–22, 2019 2019 CS U.S. Classic 1
74.16
2
130.14
1
204.30
2018–19 season
DateEvent SP FS Total
March 18–24, 2019 2019 World Championships 8
70.60
6
145.35
6
215.95
February 5–10, 20192019 Bavarian Open 2
67.79
1
136.77
1
204.56
December 20–24, 2018 2018–19 Japan Championships 1
76.76
4
146.58
3
223.34
December 6–9, 2018 2018–19 Grand Prix Final 6
67.52
6
133.79
6
201.31
November 9–11, 2018 2018 NHK Trophy 2
76.08
2
143.39
2
219.47
October 19–21, 2018 2018 Skate America 1
73.86
1
145.85
1
219.71
September 12–16, 2018 2018 CS U.S. Classic 1
67.53
1
133.70
1
201.23
2017–18 season
DateEvent SP FS Total
March 19–25, 2018 2018 World Championships 3
74.36
3
135.72
3
210.08
February 15–23, 2018 2018 Winter Olympics 4
75.94
4
146.44
4
222.38
February 9–12, 2018 2018 Winter Olympics (team event) 4
68.95
5 T
January 22–28, 2018 2018 Four Continents Championships 1
71.74
3
135.28
3
207.02
December 21–24, 2017 2017–18 Japan Championships 2
73.23
1
147.16
1
220.39
December 7–10, 2017 2017–18 Grand Prix Final 3
74.61
4
138.88
5
213.49
November 24–26, 2017 2017 Skate America 1
70.72
1
143.31
1
214.03
November 10–12, 2017 2017 NHK Trophy 6
65.05
6
126.75
5
191.80
2016–17 season
DateEvent SP FS Total
December 22–25, 2016 2016–17 Japan Championships 1
76.49
1
138.38
1
214.87
December 8–11, 2016 2016–17 Grand Prix Final 3
74.64
2
143.69
2
218.33
November 25–27, 2016 2016 NHK Trophy 3
64.20
2
133.80
2
198.00
October 28–30, 2016 2016 Skate Canada International 5
65.24
3
126.84
3
192.08
October 1, 20162016 Japan Open 2
143.39
1T
September 14–18, 2016 2016 CS U.S. Classic 1
70.09
1
136.66
1
206.75
2015–16 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
April 22–24, 2016 2016 Team Challenge Cup 3P/1T
73.28
2
145.02
2P/3T
March 28 – April 3, 2016 2016 World Championships 6
70.72
3
139.89
5
210.61
February 16–21, 2016 2016 Four Continents Championships 1
72.48
1
142.43
1
214.91
December 24–27, 2015 2015–16 Japan Championships 1
73.24
1
139.59
1
212.83
December 10–13, 2015 2015–16 Grand Prix Final 4
68.76
2
140.09
2
208.85
November 27–29, 2015 2015 NHK Trophy 1
69.53
1
133.58
1
203.11
October 23–25, 2015 2015 Skate America 3
65.12
3
122.95
3
188.07
October 3, 20152015 Japan Open 2
134.67
1T
September 16–20, 2015 2015 CS U.S. Classic 1
63.48
1
120.16
1
183.64
2014–15 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
April 16–19, 2015 2015 World Team Trophy 6
60.52
3
129.12
3T/5P
189.64
March 23–29, 2015 2015 World Championships 3
67.02
4
126.58
2
193.60
February 15–19, 2015 2015 Four Continents Championships 1
64.84
2
116.75
2
181.59
December 26–28, 2014 2014–15 Japan Championships 2
64.48
1
131.12
1
195.60
November 28–30, 2014 2014 NHK Trophy 4
60.69
2
118.33
3
179.02
October 31 – November 2, 2014 2014 Skate Canada International 4
60.22
3
121.53
3
181.75
October 4, 20142014 Japan Open 2
131.94
3T
September 18–21, 2014 2014 CS Lombardia Trophy 1
58.12
1
125.78
1
183.90
2013–14 season
DateEventSPFSTotal
March 29–30, 20142014 Gardena Spring Trophy 1
62.18
2
105.04
1
167.22
January 20–26, 2014 2014 Four Continents Championships 4
60.27
2
126.26
2
186.53
December 20–23, 2013 2013–14 Japan Championships 4
66.52
5
125.06
4
191.58
November 22–24, 2013 2013 Rostelecom Cup 6
56.57
6
109.19
5
165.76
November 8–10, 2013 2013 NHK Trophy 6
58.39
5
111.82
5
170.21
August 8–11, 20132013 Asian Trophy 1
54.43
1
115.42
1
169.85

Junior level

Miyahara at the 2012-13 Junior Grand Prix Final 2012-12 Final Grand Prix 1d 496 Satoko Miyahara.JPG
Miyahara at the 2012-13 Junior Grand Prix Final
Miyahara at the 2012 World Junior Championships 2012 World Junior FS Satoko Miyahara.jpg
Miyahara at the 2012 World Junior Championships
2013–14 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
March 10–16, 2014 2014 World Junior Championships Junior4
63.57
4
114.12
4
177.69
2012–13 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
February 25 – March 3, 2013 2013 World Junior Championships Junior6
52.16
8
95.26
7
147.42
December 20–24, 2012 2012–13 Japan Championships Senior3
60.19
3
120.36
3
180.55
December 6–9, 2012 2012–13 JGP Final Junior5
49.60
5
108.14
5
157.74
November 17–18, 2012 2012–13 Japan Junior Championships Junior1
61.31
1
111.37
1
172.68
September 22–24, 2012 2012 JGP Turkey Junior6
46.62
2
96.74
3
143.36
August 30 – September 1, 2012 2012 JGP United States Junior1
54.76
1
106.89
1
161.65
August 8–12, 20122012 Asian Trophy Junior2
49.29
1
98.92
1
148.21
2011–12 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
February 27 – March 4, 2012 2012 World Junior Championships Junior4
52.97
6
104.81
4
157.78
December 22–25, 2011 2011–12 Japan Championships Senior15
47.06
3
116.79
6
163.85
November 25–27, 2011 2011–12 Japan Junior Championships Junior1
56.76
1
115.41
1
172.17
October 25–27, 2011 2011 JGP Italy Junior7
44.91
3
98.33
5
143.24
September 15–17, 2011 2011 JGP Poland Junior2
56.46
2
105.74
2
162.20
2010–11 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
April 4–10, 2011 2011 Triglav Trophy Novice2
35.32
1
73.07
2
108.39
November 26–28, 20102010–11 Japan Junior Championships Junior10
43.74
4
96.49
4
140.23
August 27–29, 20102010 Asian Trophy Novice1
43.69
1
92.19
1
135.88
2009–10 season
DateEventLevelSPFSTotal
March 31 – April 4, 2010 2010 Triglav Trophy Novice4
38.30
2
90.85
2
129.15
November 21–23, 2009 2009–10 Japan Junior Championships Junior4
48.32
6
82.67
4
130.99

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Kaori Sakamoto is a Japanese figure skater. She is the 2018 Four Continents champion, a two-time Skate America silver medalist, the 2018 Grand Prix of Helsinki bronze medalist, the 2019 Japanese national champion, and the 2018 Japanese national silver medalist. She placed 6th at the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Mai Mihara Japanese figure skater

Mai Mihara is a Japanese competitive figure skater. She is the 2017 Four Continents champion, 2018 Four Continents Silver Medalist, 2019 Four Continents Bronze Medalist, 2018 Internationaux de France silver medalist, 2016 CS Nebelhorn Trophy champion, and 2016–17 Japanese national bronze medalist.

Bradie Tennell American figure skater

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You Young South Korean figure skater

You Young is a South Korean figure skater competing in the ladies' singles event. She is the 2020 Youth Olympic champion, the 2020 Four Continents silver medalist, and a four-time South Korean national champion. She became the youngest ever national champion of South Korea at age 11, surpassing the previous record set by Yuna Kim who won at age 12 in 2003. She is also the first Korean lady to successfully land a triple axel in international competition, and the first Korean lady to win the gold medal at the Winter Youth Olympics.

Alina Zagitova Russian figure skater

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Rika Kihira Japanese figure skater

Rika Kihira is a Japanese figure skater. She is a two-time Four Continents champion, the 2018–19 Grand Prix Final champion, a two-time Grand Prix champion a two-time Challenger Series champion a two-time Challenge Cup champion (2019-20), and the 2019–20 Japanese national champion, where she has also won silver (2018–19) and bronze (2017–18). She finished fourth at the 2019 World Championships. Kihira is one of eleven women to have landed the triple Axel jump in an international competition organized by the International Skating Union, and the first ever woman to land a triple Axel-triple toeloop combination.

Lim Eun-soo figure skater

Lim Eun-soo is a South Korean figure skater. She is the 2018 Rostelecom Cup bronze medalist, the two-time CS Asian Open champion, the 2018 CS U.S. Classic silver medalist, and the 2017 South Korean national champion. She has finished within the top ten at two senior ISU Championships.

Sofia Samodurova Russian figure skater

Sofia Vyacheslavovna Samodurova is a Russian figure skater. She is the 2019 European champion, the 2019 CS Ice Star champion, the 2018 Rostelecom Cup silver medalist, and the 2018 Skate America bronze medalist. On the junior level, she is the 2017 JGP Croatia and 2017 JGP Italy champion.

Mako Yamashita Japanese figure skater

Mako Yamashita is a Japanese figure skater. She is the 2018 Skate Canada silver medalist and a two-time medalist at the ISU Challenger Series. On the junior level, she is the 2018 World Junior bronze medalist, a four-time medalist on the ISU Junior Grand Prix series, and the 2017–18 Japanese junior national silver medalist.

Alena Kostornaia Russian figure skater

Aliona Sergeyevna Kostornaia is a Russian figure skater. She is the 2020 European champion, the 2019–20 Grand Prix Final champion, the 2019 Internationaux de France champion, the 2019 NHK Trophy champion and the 2019 CS Finlandia Trophy champion. Competing domestically, she is the 2020 Russian national silver medalist, and a two-time Russian national bronze medalist.

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