Teispes

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Teispes
Great King, King of Anshan [2]
Lineage of Darius the Great.jpg
Position of Teispes in the Achaemenid lineage according to Darius the Great in the Behistun inscription.
King of Persia
Reign675–640 BC
Born?
Died640 BC
Issue
House Achaemenid
Father Achaemenes

Teïspes (from Greek Τεΐσπης; in Old Persian : 𐎨𐎡𐏁𐎱𐎡𐏁 [3] Cišpiš) [4] ruled Anshan in 675–640 BC. He was the son of Achaemenes of Persis and an ancestor of Cyrus the Great. [5] There is evidence that Cyrus I and Ariaramnes were both his sons. [5] Cyrus I is the grandfather of Cyrus the Great, whereas Ariaramnes is the great-grandfather of Darius the Great.

Contents

According to 7th-century BC documents, Teispes captured the Elamite city of Anshan, speculated to have occurred after the Persians were freed from Median supremacy, and expanded his small kingdom. His kingdom was, however, a vassal state of the Neo-Assyrian Empire (911–605 BC). He was succeeded by his second son, Cyrus I. [5]

The etymology of the name

Schmitt suggests that the name is probably Iranian, but its etymology is unknown. Its connection with either the name of the Mitannian and Urartu storm god Tešup-Theispas, or with the (Elamite) byname 𒍝𒆜𒉿𒆜𒅆𒅀 Zaišpîšiya is likely. [5]

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References

  1. Cyrus Cylinder
  2. Cyrus Cylinder
  3. Akbarzadeh (2006), page 56
  4. Kent (1384 AP), page 394
  5. 1 2 3 4 Schmitt, 1992

Bibliography

Teispes
Born: ? Died: 640 BC
Preceded by
Achaemenes
King of Anshan Succeeded by
Cyrus I