Achaemenid family tree

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The Achaemenid Empire was the first Persian empire, founded in 550 BC by Cyrus the Great. This article contains the Achaemenid family tree.

Achaemenid Empire first Persian Empire founded by Cyrus the Great

The Achaemenid Empire, also called the First Persian Empire, was an ancient Iranian empire based in Western Asia founded by Cyrus the Great. Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans and Eastern Europe proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 million square kilometers. Incorporating various peoples of different origins and faiths, it is notable for its successful model of a centralised, bureaucratic administration, for building infrastructure such as road systems and a postal system, the use of an official language across its territories, and the development of civil services and a large professional army. The empire's successes inspired similar systems in later empires.

The Persians are an Iranian ethnic group that make up over half the population of Iran. They share a common cultural system and are native speakers of the Persian language, as well as closely related languages.

Cyrus the Great King and founder of the Achaemenid Empire

Cyrus II of Persia, commonly known as Cyrus the Great, and also called Cyrus the Elder by the Greeks, was the founder of the Achaemenid Empire, the first Persian Empire. Under his rule, the empire embraced all the previous civilized states of the ancient Near East, expanded vastly and eventually conquered most of Western Asia and much of Central Asia. From the Mediterranean Sea and Hellespont in the west to the Indus River in the east, Cyrus the Great created the largest empire the world had yet seen. Under his successors, the empire eventually stretched at its maximum extent from parts of the Balkans and Eastern Europe proper in the west, to the Indus Valley in the east. His regal titles in full were The Great King, King of Persia, King of Anshan, King of Media, King of Babylon, King of Sumer and Akkad, and King of the Four Corners of the World. The Nabonidus Chronicle notes the change in his title from simply "King of Anshan", a city, to "King of Persia". Assyriologist François Vallat wrote that "When Astyages marched against Cyrus, Cyrus is called ‘King of Anshan’, but when Cyrus crosses the Tigris on his way to Lydia, he is ‘King of Persia’. The coup therefore took place between these two events."

Contents

Family tree

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Achaemenes
King of Persia [*]
705–675
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Teispes
King of Persia
675–640
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cyrus I
King of Persia
640–600
 
 
 
 
 
Ariaramnes
Prince [*]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cambyses I
King of Persia
600–559
 
Arukku
 
Arsames
Prince [*]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cyrus II the Great
King of Persia
559–530/28
 
 
 
 
 
Hystaspes
Prince [*]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pharnaces I
satrap of Phrygia
Pharnacid dynasty
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Megabates
military leader
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Artystone
Princess
 
Smerdis (Bardiya)
Prince (imposter Gaumata
ruled as Smerdis [*] )
522
 
Cambyses II
King of Persia
530–522
 
Atossa
Princess
 
Darius I the Great
King of Persia
522–486
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Artaphernes I
general
satrap of Lydia
 
Artabanus
councelor
 
Megabazus
general
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parmys
 
(by daughter of Gobryas)
Ariabignes
admiral
 
(by Atossa)
Masistes
satrap of Bactria
 
(by Atossa)
Xerxes I the Great
King of Persia
485–465
 
(by Atossa)
Achaemenes
satrap of Egypt
 
(by Artystone)
Artazostre
married Mardonius
 
(by Parmys)
Ariomardus
 
Artaphernes II
general
satrap of Lydia
 
Artyphius
commander
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Artaynte
 
Artaxerxes I Long-handed
King of Persia
465–424
 
Darius
crown prince
 
Hystaspes
satrap of Bactria
 
Arsames (I)
satrap of Egypt
 
Amytis
married Megabyzus
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Xerxes II
King of Persia
424
 
Sogdianus
King of Persia
424–423
 
Darius II Nothus
King of Persia
423–404
 
Arsites
satrap of Phrygia
 
Parysatis (I)
Princess
 
Bagapaios
Prince
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Artaxerxes II Mnemon
King of Persia
404–358
 
Amestris
Princess
 
Cyrus the Younger
Prince
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Ostanes
Prince
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Artaxerxes III Ochus
King of Persia
358–338
 
Ariaspes
prince
 
Rodrogune
married Orontes I
satrap of Sophene & Metiene
 
Apama
married Pharnabazus II
satrap of Phrygia
 
Sisygambis
Princess
 
Arsames (II)
Prince
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Darius III Codomannus
King of Persia
336–330
 
Oxathres
Prince
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Artaxerxes IV Arses
King of Persia
338–336
 
Parysatis (II)
Princess
 
Alexander III the Great
King of Macedon and Persia
329–323
 
Stateira II
Princess
 
Drypetis
married Hephestion general
 
Amastrine
married Craterus general;
Dionysius tyrant of Heraclea;
Lysimachus king of Thrace
 
 
 


See also

Template:Cyrus-tree

Notes

* 1 2 3 4 5 : Unconfirmed rulers, due to the Behistun Inscription.

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References

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