Yakareb

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Yakareb may have been a ruler of some part of Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period, possibly during the 17th century BC, and likely belonging to the Fourteenth Dynasty. [3] [4] As such he would have ruled from Avaris over the eastern Nile Delta and possibly over the Western Delta as well. His chronological position and identity are unclear.

Contents

Attestations

Yakareb is one of the few attested kings of the 14th Dynasty with two scarab seals attributable to him, both of unknown provenance. [3] [4] One of the two scarabs is currently housed in the Egyptian Museum of Berlin, catalog number 293/73, while the other is in the Petrie Museum, under the catalog number 11810. [3] [5] [6] [7]

Since "Yakareb" is this king's nomen, it is not possible to assert whether or not Yakareb is listed on the Turin canon. The Turin canon is a king list redacted in the early Ramesside period which serves as the primary historical source for the 14th Dynasty but which records only the prenomen of the kings. Furthermore, the document is fragmentary and Yakareb's prenomen may be lost in a lacuna. [4] Thus, Yakareb is attested for certain by only the two scarabs, both of which are crudely made, and it is possible that "Yakareb" is a garbled or variant form of the name of a better known king of this time period. [6]

Chronological position

Although the chronological position of Yakareb is uncertain, the Egyptologists Kim Ryholt and Darrell Baker proposed that he ruled in the 14th Dynasty some time before Yaqub-Har. This estimation is based on a seriation of the scarabs dating to the Second Intermediate Period. [3]

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References

  1. 1 2 Flinders Petrie: Scarabs and cylinders with names, illustrated by the Egyptian collection in University College, London by W. M. Flinders Petrie, British school of archaeology in Egypt and Egyptian research account, London 1917, available online copyright-free see pl. xxii, num 16.h.1
  2. 1 2 Percy E. Newberry: Scarabs an introduction to the study of Egyptian seals and signet rings, with forty-four plates and one hundred and sixteen illustrations in the text, 1906, available online copyright-free see plate XXII, num 8, p. 151.
  3. 1 2 3 4 K.S.B. Ryholt: The Political Situation in Egypt during the Second Intermediate Period, c.1800–1550 BC, Carsten Niebuhr Institute Publications, vol. 20. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum Press, 1997, excerpts available online here.
  4. 1 2 3 Darrell D. Baker: The Encyclopedia of the Pharaohs: Volume I - Predynastic to the Twentieth Dynasty 3300–1069 BC, Stacey International, ISBN   978-1-905299-37-9, 2008, p. 500501
  5. Olga Tufnell: Studies on Scarab Seals Vol. 2, Aris & Phillips 1984, ISBN   978-0856681301, see seal num. 3493
  6. 1 2 The scarab on Digital Egypt, Petrie Museum.
  7. The scarab on the catalog of the Petrie Museum