First Dynasty of Egypt family tree

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Family tree of the First Dynasty of Egypt , ruling ancient Egypt in the 32nd century BCE to the 30th century BCE.

The First Dynasty of ancient Egypt covers the first series of Egyptian kings to rule over a unified Egypt. It immediately follows the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt, possibly by Narmer, and marks the beginning of the Early Dynastic Period, a time at which power was centered at Thinis.

Ancient Egypt ancient civilization of Northeastern Africa

Ancient Egypt was a civilization of ancient North Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile River in the place that is now the country Egypt. Ancient Egyptian civilization followed prehistoric Egypt and coalesced around 3100 BC with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under Menes. The history of ancient Egypt occurred as a series of stable kingdoms, separated by periods of relative instability known as Intermediate Periods: the Old Kingdom of the Early Bronze Age, the Middle Kingdom of the Middle Bronze Age and the New Kingdom of the Late Bronze Age.

Chart

Double crown.svg NARMER /
MENES
Neithotep
Double crown.svg AHA Khenthap
Double crown.svg DJER ?
Double crown.svg DJET Merneith
Double crown.svg DEN ?
Double crown.svg ADJIB Betrest
Double crown.svg SEMERKHET ?
Double crown.svg QA'A

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